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Theoden's death with Merry beside him was a tear-jerker for me, much more so than when the ringbearers sailed off-into-the-sunset.
If that`s in the movie I`ll use a whole box of tissues. (Just 4 that part!lol)
Big Laugh Smilie
Yea...i know. *sniffle* i am already crying just thinking about it! lol.
I didnt really find a part in the Trilogy that was sad....o yea. The Ending. I think i used a box of tissues! but it wasnt because of what Samwise said. It was because.................The Trilogy was ending!!!!!!!!!! Very Sad Smilie *sob*
The saddest part to me is when Boromir died and right before that he felt sorry for what he did to Frodo to get the ring... I think like Tolkien kinda created that part thinking with his heart... Wow, that looked strange... That's all folks!
Sam being left behind when he is torn between his family and Frodo.
Gollum dying got to me, poor little fellow....
Yeah, I agree with you pesi, I was most affected by the death of Theoden....in fact that was the part I felt the most sad in the book. I could go on and on about why I was so sad that Theoden died but I better not...I will be dubbed a sentimenal fool. Tongue Smilie
I agree with the part about Theoden being sad. I also found the parts about the Elves sad as well. I found the part when Sam thinks Frodo is dead sad too. And the part when Sam is being left behind, torn between his family and Frodo, as Ross said.
I find the song: 'Where now the horse and the rider?..." extremly sad, strange I know. I think it's just the concept of their culture fading away that I find such a loss.
I find the ending of any book sad, because while I am reading it, the characters come alive and are your friends. Once you finish, it is like not seeing them again.
Yea, thats how I felt, Valedhelgwath. *sniffle* Ive decided to read them over and over so I'll never forget them!
Men live. Men die. Sooner or later. Nothing stays the same. But when cycles cease forever... somehow for me it is the anticipation of never that hurts the most.


I do not think I will ever see my beech tree again, around whose roots I learned to walk, where I used to sleep out under her branches at night rolled up in old blankets, where I used to sit at her feet and read Tolkien. The house is sold, the farms are gone, and housing developments cover that green country of my memory.

The last time I was there, I ran stumbling down into the bottom of the woods blinded by tears and kissed the tree's bark when I left. It sounds idiotic in retrospect.

What has this to do with your question? Everything. As a child I never dreamed Tolkien was not writing about the Brandywine Valley, a mushroom-growing rural area of Pennsylvania, where I grew up. So these quotes bite deep in two ways: through my love of Middle-Earth, where I grew up in my mind, and through my love of the Brandywine Valley, where I grew up in my body.

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And taking Frodo's hand in his, he left the hill of Ceren Amroth and came there neer again as living man.


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'... Then you may remember Galadriel, and catch a glimpse far off of Lórien, that you have seen only in our winter. For our spring and our summer are gone by, and they will never be seen on earth again save in memory.'



And I am afraid to go back, if I'm ever near that place again.

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she went out from the city of Minas Tirith and passed away to the land of Lórien, and dwelt there alone under the fading trees until winter came. Galadirel had passed away and Celeborn was gone, and the land was silent.

There at last when the mallorn-leaves were falling, but spring had not yet come, she laid herself to rest upon Cerin Amroth; and there is her green grave, until the world is changed, and all the days of her life are utterly forgotten by men that come after, and elanor and niphredil bloom no more east of the Sea.



But I just noticed something in writing this I never quite saw before. Aragorn never came back as a living man.

But as a dead man?

I think he waited for her.


[Edited on 4/21/03 by sepdet]
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But I just noticed something in writing this I never quite saw before. Aragorn never came back as a living man.

But as a dead man?

I think he waited for her.
There are several parallels between the tales of Aragorn and Arwen, and that of Beren and Luthien. In both, an immortal chooses mortality to be with the person they love. Beren waited in the Halls of Mandos for Luthien to join him the first time they died, and their second deaths appear to have occurred close to each other.

Fea (spirits) tend to be solitary when in Mandos, but those that have strong ties do tend to join with each other in the Halls. I'm sure Aragorn waited for Arwen to join him, just as Beren had awaited Luthien.
Shucks Sepdet, when I read again the death of Arwen and your comment on Aragorn waiting there for her, my eyes clouded up. I must not have gotten enough sleep last night. Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie
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I find the ending of any book sad, because while I am reading it, the characters come alive and are your friends. Once you finish, it is like not seeing them again.


Wow! That is exactly how I feel too! Strange...It is like they live only in your memories or something and will never be able to create new memories with you. Sometimes I miss books and other activities like this too and keep rereading or redoing it to regain the initial feeling.
I don`t know because I haven`t finished reading the book! Wink Smilie But from what I`ve read, there are no sad parts to read.... Sad Smilie Very Sad Smilie
I think that the saddest part in LoTR is Boromir's demise. Not that i weeped when reading that part, but still i found that part to be very err.... sad.

For me the saddest moment is when Frodo claims the Ring for his own, after such a heroic strife to resist the temptation. And then his quiet suffering in Shire, almost unnoticed by everybody save his best friends.
The first time I read this, I could not add anything. I believe that everyone here has completely covered most of the sad parts. There were several that I thought were sad, but they have been listed here.

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“Gollum dying got to me, poor little fellow....”


This one surprised me, considering that it came from Plastic. You need to be careful; I think you are going to be losing your “tough guy” image here at PT. Your shell is cracking and we can see the nice, caring guy underneath. Yes, I felt sorry for him too.

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“I find the ending of any book sad, because while I am reading it, the characters come alive and are your friends. Once you finish, it is like not seeing them again.”


There has never been a truer statement made here at PT. I think that is why I started looking for websites, so that there would not be a true ending. If you discuss the books with others that have enjoyed them, then the characters can still stay alive and one can keep the story going and going. One can also learn different things from others they one may have missed the first time or two through. That is the great thing about LOTR and most of Tolkien's books, there is so much there that one can keep the newness of the story going as well.
Did you already read the History of ME books, Mellie? This year I read at last "The book of lost tales" and "The Lays of Beleriand" (I got them as my Christmas present). Since then, I reread "The Lays of Beleriand" many times and I am delighted to find there a tremendous amount of information about places and heroes of the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales. It is true that this information is not always wholly compatible with the later writings of JRRT, but anyway I was able to wander once more in the ME and to see at last very clearly some places where I have never been before, such as the forest of Doriath, Menegroth, Nargothrond and the whereabouts of the Lake of Ivrin, a beautiful. enchanted place, almost as fair as Lothlorien or Rivendell... I am so glad that these early writings of JRRT have been published!
Eryan, it looks like we are following each other around the forums. I have read. The Hobbit, LOTR, Unfinished Tales, Lost Tales 1 & 2, Part of Lays of Beleriand. I have not gotten far in the History of ME books. I was getting so wrapped up im ME, that I was doing nothing but Tolkien. My family was calling me obsessive. So now, I have gone on to other books at the moment. I own all of the HOME series except the last 2.
The saddest part for me is when the Witch-King of Angmar dies.

Kidding : the saddest part is when Frodo departs from Middle-Earth at the Grey Havens.
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“I find the ending of any book sad, because while I am reading it, the characters come alive and are your friends. Once you finish, it is like not seeing them again.”
Except with The Hobbit, LotR, The Sil, and UT, we can reread them again for the umpteenth time and usually find something new in the story which we missed the last times.

And having others to discuss it with just makes learning these new slants on the stories more enjoyable without having to come to the end of the book sadly or otherwise: "Fordo Lives!" as does the book.
I also agree Ringfacwen. When December rolls around, my friends and I will be gathering together for the last time to see ROTK on opening night, ending a yearly tradition. Despite our severe criticism of TTT, the anticipation and excite before the start of the movie was tremendous. But the essential part of our love for Tolkien lies with the books, of course!
"It often must be so, Sam, when things are in danger: some one has to give them up, lose them, so that others might keep them."

(Frodo to Sam-book VI, Chapter9)

whaa! i cry when i read it! but it is in a sense happy. Frodo will no longer be in pain. I admire the illusion Tolkien created here, he is leaving so in a way dying. But he will not be in pain anymore. It is happy, but so sad! Sad Smilie / Wink Smilie
I think the bit where Gandalf first snuffed it was one of the saddest part, especialy for first time readers who have never read the book before (or seen the movies) and have absolutly no idea that he's gonna come back to life as super Gandalf *sniggers*
Theoden's death scene used to get me a bit weepy too. Then I saw the movie where, due to the magic of hollywood and PJ changeing everything, THEODEN SURVIVES...
eather that or I've got the wrong scene and he snuffs it in the next book...alas, I shall never know for I left my copys of TTT and RotK in my locker at college and some b*gger pinched them.
Wrong book, but PJ will no doubt have him rulling Minas Tirith if he get's his own way!
Or perhaps Denethor will go mad and try to murder his own son? That would be really tragic. Wink Smilie

The saddest part in TTT for me was the Haldir thing. Mainly because it caught me by surprise. The one good thing about PJ's tampering is that you can never be 100% sure what is going to happen next.
Well, I will say now something very unpopular! I think that the saddest thing about Denethor is that so many people dislike him so much. And yet he was a shrewd, honest man. I am very, very fond of Faramir, but, honestly, if I were Denethor and my son would come to tell me that he just alllowed to let the Ring go to Mordor in hands of two halflings having much good will and couragel but practically no military training, I'd go mad! I think I might even put Faramir in my dungeon, or make him court-martialled for treason. The quest of Frodo was hopeless and he would never never succeed without repeated divine intervention, as very finely explained by Grondy in some other thread. But I understand very well the reluctance of Denethor to put trust in divine intervention only!
Well now you will all dislike ME! Smile Smilie

[Edited on 9/7/2003 by Eryan]
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Well, I will say now something very unpopular! I think that the saddest thing about Denethor is that so many people dislike him so much. And yet he was a shrewd, honest man. I am very, very fond of Faramir, but, honestly, if I were Denethor and my son would come to tell me that he just alllowed to let the Ring go to Mordor in hands of two halflings having much good will and couragel but practically no military training, I'd go mad! I think I might even put Faramir in my dungeon, or make him court-martialled for treason. The quest of Frodo was hopeless and he would never never succeed without repeated divine intervention, as very finely explained by Grondy in some other thread. But I understand very well the reluctance of Denethor to put trust in divine intervention only!
Well now you will all dislike ME! Smile Smilie

[Edited on 9/7/2003 by Eryan]



i wont dislike you. i under stand what you mean. but understanding what you mean does not mean if i was denethor i would make the same choice you said you would. i would have tryed my hardest to get my mind off it. but denethor had it hard cause of everything that was happening. he was all so greedy by nature. and i am not saying either i would forgive him for trying to murder faramir. after he went mad is when people start to dislike him, cause he was well madBad! Smilie.
sorry did not mean to post that.I
[i just had to put that smilie, and Eryan is NOT stupid]

Denethor was the product of his times, his responsibilities placed him under great stress, he certainly wasn't evil by nature and I don't think he was greedy; he just wanted to live out his last days in peace, and then for the Stewardship to pass on to his son Boromir. Actual events and the scenes manipulated by Sauron via the palantir, just wore him down and he snapped resulting in his trying to cause great harm to his remaining son and to himself, not to mention his dereliction of duty to the people of his city and country.

I don't think any the less of Eryan or #1ElijahLover, nor should anyone else about what gets posted here; that is their right as members, and if we happen to disagree with anything, that just gives us something to talk about. The world would be a very boring place if everyone believed the same thing.
I have to tell you all about a moment in my VERY FIRST reading of RotK, when I was just a young gel...it's not a sad bit as such but it was a "weepie" for me...I had been reading feverishly away getting so incredibly deep and involved in everything, I was so buried in reading about the battle of the Pelennor Fields...and when I got to the bit where Eomer is looking out from a hillock and sees the ships... "Thus came Aragorn son of Arathorn, Elessar, Isildur's heir, out of the Paths of the Dead, borne upon a wind from the Sea to the kingdom of Gondor..." well I just couldn't keep reading! I ran out of the kitchen and threw myself onto my bed and sobbed for ages before I could continue!! Even thinking about it all these years (decades!) later, I still get a lump in my throat...so no, not sad, but how incredibly moving! I have never ever been affected by a book as much as that! I know I am a bit emotional...I sit in the theatre watching PJ's efforts and even though I'm not all that happy with all the changes I still have to sob sometimes out of sheer amazement and excitement and the thrill of seeing something done so brilliantly up on the big screen, something that's been so big a part of my psychological life for so long...
Roheryn, you speak for me, too! LOTR acted in the same way on me from the very beginning. I know very well the emotion you describe, and for me it also had a purely physical and not only psychological dimension. JRRT called it "uplifting of hear"... and was able to induce it in us readers in a truly masterly way!
The saddest part would have to be Borimer dieing!!!!!!!!!!! and then in the two towers faramir talking about it!!!!!!! whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Sad Smilie Mad Smilie i'm so angry!!!!!!!!!! why does he have to die!!!!!!!!! and then that elf dieing in the two towers i cant remember his name!!!! they put it in slow motion in the movie then aragorn runs over and catchs him and his head falls back and hes dead!!!!!!! Very Sad Smilie Sad Smilie Very Sad Smilie Sad Smilie Very Sad Smilie Sad Smilie Very Sad Smilie Sad Smilie Very Sad Smilie
I think the saddest part was when Merry was talking to the dieing King, near where Eowyn was lying, herself half-dead with broken arm and shattered spirit.

Merry took Theoden's death really hard, sort of like losing ones father. I felt they were kindred spirits and they never really got to discuss herb lore together, except for that short period on the road to Dunharrow.
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!!!!!!!!! and then that elf dieing in the two towers i cant remember his name!!!! they put it in slow motion in the movie then aragorn runs over and catchs him and his head falls back and hes dead!!!!!!!
Don't worry, HobbitHomie05, that part didn't really happen. Legolas was the only elf at the Battle of Helm's Deep. PJ just had them turn up in the film version, I believe, to show that elves from Lothlorien were fighting Sauron's armies at the same time when their woods were invaded by an army from Dol Guldur.
Gandalf's fall was easily the most sad for me
seconded by Boromir
phewww!!!!! thanks for telling me that Valedhelgwath!!!!! I'm still in the middle of FotR book!!! Why do you think PJ had him die at helms deep if he didn't even fight there in the book?? Is it because he dies somewhere else??

Isildur, I was devestated when gandalf fell!!!! Sad Smilie Very Sad Smilie but then when I saw TTT it wasn't sad anymore because he ending up living!!!! What they really did wrong for preveiws of TTT is that they showed gandalf that was supposed to be a surrprise tht he was still alive!!!! that really burnt the surprise!!! Exclamation Smilie Exclamation Smilie Exclamation Smilie Exclamation Smilie So Angry Smilie

[Edited on 6/12/2003 by HobbitHomie05]
For me, the saddest part of LOTR is in the Appendices : the scene where Aragorn dies.
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Why do you think PJ had him die at helms deep if he didn't even fight there in the book?? Is it because he dies somewhere else??
Some people would say it's because PJ obviously hasn't read the books and made a rubbish film. Personally I see it as film and books being two different media forms. PJ just couldn't fit everything into three films and do it justice. Shortly after the battle of Helms Deep, Lothlorien and Elven Kingdom in Mirkwood came under attack from Dol Guldur, while the Dwarves of the Lonely Mountain and the Men of Dale came under attack from an Easterling army. As PJ couldn't fit all these battles into his film, I feel he had the Elves turn up at Helms Deep as a way of showing they had fought in the war too.

As for Haldir, it doesn't specify in the books whether he survives the war or not. If he was slain, however, it would almost certainly be while defending the borders of Lothlorien.
THIS HAS SOME SPOILERS FOR THOSE WHO HAVEN"T READ THE BOOK!
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I think the saddest part was when Merry was talking to the dieing King, near where Eowyn was lying, herself half-dead with broken arm and shattered spirit.

Merry took Theoden's death really hard, sort of like losing ones father. I felt they were kindred spirits and they never really got to discuss herb lore together, except for that short period on the road to Dunharrow.

I agree with you, Grondy. Theoden's death was hard especially the fact that he died not knowing Eowyn was lying besides him, and then we see Merry couldn't bear to smoke his pipe because it reminds him of Theoden. It was sad because it suggested events that could have been.

Another sad part for me was when Frodo left to go to the Grey Havens. I know that he'll find happiness there, but I think in a way I felt what Sam felt, to have followed Frodo on his journey to the end, but then having to say goodbye.
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And the ship went out into the High Sea and passed on into the West, until at last on a night of rain Frodo smelled a sweet fragrance on the air and heard the sound of singing that came over the water. And then it seemed to him that as in his dream in the house of Bombadil, the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a far green country under a swift sunrise.

But to Sam the evening deepened to darkness as he stood at the Haven; and as he looked at the grey sea he saw only a shadow on the waters that was soon lost in the West. There still he stood far into the night, hearing only the sigh and murmur of the waves on the shores of Middle-Earth, and the sound of them sank deep into his heart. Beside him stood Merry and Pippin, and they were silent.
- The Grey Havens, ROTK

But the Appendices also brought out the saddest part for me when it told on the deaths of Aragorn, Merry and Pippin as well as the passing to the Grey Havens of Sam, Legolas and Gimli. Because that's when I know that the journey has really come to an end. Sad Smilie
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And when that ship passed an end was come in Middle-Earth of the Fellowship of the Ring. - Appendix B