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What were the names, deeds, and colors of the other wizards besides gandalf,radagast,and saruman?
They were Pallando and Alatar, the blue wizards. It is said that they went East and founded magic sects among Easterlings/Haradrim and tried to get the Easterlings/Haradrim to resist Sauron but failed.
Their is the possibility, though, that before they failed, they actually managed to arouse discord amongst the wild tribes of East and South, hindering Sauron's plans for a while, by not allowing him to cencentrate all of his forces against the Westlands! This could be a speculation, though...
thanks yall i me and my friend were hitting are heads against the wall trying to figure that out
You could have tried reading the Unfinished Tales it's all there but it doesn't say much about the blue wizards except their names and that they went to the east.
For just a little more info on the Ithryn Luin, they both wore 'sea-blue', and had went into the East (i.e. Rhûn) with Saruman, and never returned. It is possible that they pursued their purposes there, or perished, or were ensnared by Sauron and became his servants. Or, they could have been corrupted like Saruman, searching for power. Alatar was chosen to go to Middle-earth by the Vala Oromë, and he took Pallando as a friend. Other notes indicate that Pallando was also a follower of Oromë (this replaces his previous ties to Námo and Nienna).
Tolkien said "they went as emissaries to distant regions, East and South, far out of Númenórean range: missionaries to enemy-occupied lands, as it were. What success they had I do not know; but I fear they failed, as Saruman did, though doubtless in different ways; and I suspect that they were founders or beginners of secret cults and 'magic' traditions that outlasted the fall of Sauron."

On an etymological tangent, it is possible that the names Alatar and Pallando meant Great Lord and Wide Gate, though those are entirely my speculations and have no attestations.
I always liked the way Mr Tolkien wrote concerning things such as wizards and many other things that might,now, be considered cliched. But he wrote about them so well that he left me hanging on my seat thinking about them because he never tells you the full story, "that's another tale", and this is part of the art of a great stroy teller, as Mr Tolkien clearly was. Don't you just love his strory telling ability, the way he writes is so gripping and one could almost mistake it for historical fact rather than tale? His reference to lores, and caverns, and mountains and the ways of Elves are all rather blurry and it makes you think that there is a lifetime's study in the lore of each of them.
A grand welcome, Loornabanath!!

And about your last comment...there is! You found a great place to begin!
Quote:
Don't you just love his strory telling ability, the way he writes is so gripping and one could almost mistake it for historical fact rather than tale? His reference to lores, and caverns, and mountains and the ways of Elves are all rather blurry and it makes you think that there is a lifetime's study in the lore of each of them.


There was... Tolkien began writing the Silmarillion during the First World War and never actually finished it during his lifetime. He wrote so many notes and different drafts of the story as his ideas evolved, his son was subsequently able to publish Unfinished Tales and twelve volumes of the History of Middle Earth series all based on these notes. I have frequently commented around the site that Tolkien's work contains so much depth, I often feel like an armchair archeologist digging for new revelations.