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I wonder, what was so scary and evil about the Mines Of Moria. I read in the book that even Aragorn said that he'd been through there once and he had a bad memory of it.

Can anyone tell me about the history of Moria?? If possible, since the days of Durin.

And, by the way, Balin did try to make it worth living again, didn't he? Was it just the Orcs that killed those Drarves or was it also the Balrog?

And where did this Balrog come from??

Somebody answer me!!!
Another post from Floyd requiring a long answer. I'll do my best to answer a few of your questions, but I don't have a lot of time at the moment.

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I wonder, what was so scary and evil about the Mines Of Moria. I read in the book that even Aragorn said that he'd been through there once and he had a bad memory of it.


I think after being abandoned by the Dwarves, Moria would have been a dark and frightening place. Confusing passages disappearing deep underground, and possibly crawling with orcs. It wouldn't have been pleasant. And do not forget the aura of the Balrog.

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Can anyone tell me about the history of Moria?? If possible, since the days of Durin.


I'll save this for someone with a little more time. It was discovered by Durin early in the First Age, however, and became the greatest of the Dwarven Halls. Moria was the only known source of Mithril, and so those who lived there became fabulously rich, particularly during the Second Age when the Noldor city of Ost-en-edhel was built at its west gate. The Dwarves dug too deep for Mithril, however, and released the Balrog from the caverns in which had been trapped since the Great Battle against Morgoth at the end of the First Age. The rest was history. It and its Orc minions drove out the Dwarves.

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And, by the way, Balin did try to make it worth living again, didn't he? Was it just the Orcs that killed those Drarves or was it also the Balrog?


I wrote a short story about this entitled "Balin's Folly", which can be found in the Fan Fiction section on the left. I used a little poetic licence, but most of the story is based around events Tolkien had written.

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And where did this Balrog come from??


At the end of the First Age there was a huge battle between the forces of good and evil. As well as sinking a huge section of Western Middle Earth (Beleriand) below the ocean, a lone fleeing Balrog became trapped in a cavern deep in the roots of the Misty Mountains. It was this same beastie the Dwarves released when they dug too deep while mining for Mithril.

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Somebody answer me!!!


Okay Smile Smilie
I can just be thankfull for people like Valedhelgwath. He is one of the few who take great interest in explaining to others things in fine details. Alas i am to lazy to do so. And i dont have enough time.
Yes, i'd just tell those ppl to go and read the books. Everything you could possibly ask yourself is in there.
But who created the Balrog in the first place? Who and why would want to create such a beast?

The Balrogs were spirits, Meia, like Gandalf, created by Eru.

There were some of them that were corrupted by Morgoth and turned into the demons of fire you read about in the books.
The Silmarillion will give you a lot of answers to these questions. It gives background to the events and people before and including the War of the Rings.
Unfortunately, I do not have the Silmarillion
Stonehelm is right about the balrogs once being good spirits of the Maiar. I'm currently reading The Silmarillion and it says, "For of the Maiar many were drawn to his (Melkor's) spendour in the days of his greatness, and remained in that allegiance down into his darkness; and others he corrupted afterwards to his service with lies and treacherous gifts. Dreadful among these spirits were the Valaraukar, the scourges of fire that in Middle-earth were called the Balrogs, demons of terror."
(from the chapter entitled, Valaquenta)
Thank you for that Terri
I would have thought that this thread would end here, but wait.

Why and when had Aragorn gone into Moria before he did with the Fellowship???
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But who created the Balrog in the first place? Who and why would want to create such a beast?


Well it seems that the majority of your questions have already been sufficiently answered Floyd_n_Milan, but I will add a little more for you, hopefully you find it of some use.

As mentioned already, the Balrogs or Valaraukar were originally good Maia spirits of fire created by Eru to assist the Valar in their creation of Middle Earth. Some of these spirits were corrupted by Morgoth and turned into demons of fire for his evil purposes.

Morgoth created the Balrogs to lead his armies in the hopes of wiping out the Elves, destroying all of the works created by the Valar, and claiming Middle Earth for his own kingdom.

Just some more background for you, Morgoth was the beginning of evil. Originally Morgoth was good, and his true name in the beginning was Melkor. He was a Vala (the Valar are the most powerful of the spirits created by Eru, the Maiar are the lesser of the two spirits, and are servants to the Valar), and he was the most powerful of all the Valar.

However, Melkor became consumed by his lust to create, and dominate the wills of others (which was forbidden by Eru). He was jealous of Eru because only Eru had the true power to create, and he wanted his own world to rule, so he rebelled against Eruís wishes, and succumbed to the darkside if you will (please forgive my Star Wars analogy).

In a sense, Morgoth is sort of like the devil. You can think of him as sort of a fallen angel (Tolkien himself referred to Morgoth in this manner as well), just like Lucifer was originally a good angel of God, but fell to evil, the same can be said of Melkor-Morgoth.

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Why and when had Aragorn gone into Moria before he did with the Fellowship???


You know, Iím not sure about this question myself. Off the top of my head, Iíd say Aragorn had gone into Moria before when he was hunting for Gollum (after Gollum had escaped from him), this was around June 20th in the year 3018 of the Third Age.

Again though, this is just my guess right now, I donít remember the specifics with certainty at the moment, so I may well be wrong about this. Hopefully someone who knows the answer for sure will come along, or if I have a bit more time today, Iíll try to find the precise answer for you.
Elf Smilie
Gollum never escaped from Aragorn. Aragorn finally caught Gollum in the Dead Marshes and then brought him to the Wood Elves.

I think Aragorn just mentions he had been in Moria at one time, but he never mentions why and when.

Quote from A journey in the Dark :

'''' `I too once passed the Dimrill Gate,' said Aragorn quietly; 'but though I also came out again, the memory is very evil. I do not wish to enter Moria a second time.' '''''
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Gollum never escaped from Aragorn. Aragorn finally caught Gollum in the Dead Marshes and then brought him to the Wood Elves.


Your right about that Vir. Now that I'm remembering correctly, Aragorn caught Gollum in the Dead Marshes, and then brought him to Thranduil in Mirkwood. It was after that that Gollum escaped from the Wood-Elves on June 20th in 3018 of the Thrid Age.

All trace of Gollum was lost at this point, and it was rumored that he took refuge in Moria (see appendix B RotK). It was at this point that I guessed Aragorn may have gone into Moria looking for him?
Elf Smilie
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It was at this point that I guessed Aragorn may have gone into Moria looking for him?

No, as Gandalf, Aragorn & Co only came to know that Gollum had escaped from the Wood Elves when Legolas mentioned it during the council of Elrond.

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%%% `Alas! alas!' cried Legolas, and in his fair elvish face there was great distress. `The tidings that I was sent to bring must now be told. They are not good, but only here have I learned how evil they may seem to this company. Smťagol, who is now called Gollum, has escaped.'
'Escaped?' cried Aragorn. 'That is ill news indeed. We shall all rue it bitterly, I fear. How came the folk of Thranduil to fail in their trust?'
`Not through lack of watchfulness,' said Legolas; `but perhaps through over-kindliness. And we fear that the prisoner had aid from others, and that more is known of our doings than we could wish. We guarded this creature day and night, at Gandalf's bidding, much though we wearied of the task. But Gandalf bade us hope still for his cure, and we had not the heart to keep him ever in dungeons under the earth, where he would fall back into his old black thoughts.' %%%
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All trace of Gollum was lost at this point, and it was rumored that he took refuge in Moria (see appendix B RotK). It was at this point that I guessed Aragorn may have gone into Moria looking for him?


As a few of you have mentioned, it was after his escape from the woodelves that Gollum entered Moria. He did this to avoid the Nazgul who passed close by him as they travelled north to the Shire in search of "Baggins". Gollum then became trapped inside Moria by the Watcher in the Water, and that is how he managed to pick up the trail of the Fellowship when they entered the mines themselves.

I'm not sure when Aragorn had entered Moria but I always assumed it was in his earlier days of travelling. He left Imladris in 2951 and began his journeys. As Balin entered Moria in 2989, and Aragorn appeared ignorant of his fate, I'm guessing he entered Moria some time between 2951 and 2989.
Or Aragorn may have entered Moria when both he and Gandalf were looking for Gollum in the years between 3009 and 3017, when Aragorn finally caught Gollum in the Dead Marshes.
You know Val, you just answered one of my future questions. You just told me how Gollum might have picked up the Fellowship's trail!!!
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He left Imladris in 2951 and began his journeys. As Balin entered Moria in 2989, and Aragorn appeared ignorant of his fate, I'm guessing he entered Moria some time between 2951 and 2989.


Seems about right to me Val, this would be during the time that Aragorn was undergoing his great journeys and errantries under the disguise of Thorongil.
Elf Smilie