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Thread: Felagund's ring?

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Ok is everyone familiar with the tale of Beren when he is in Minas Tirith with Felagund and he die fighting the hound, well i have a question about that darn ring of his. Ok well Beren is distantly related to Aragorn and the ring of aragorn's line is described alot like
Felagunds, is it that the same ring? please help me on this lol i have been stumped on this one for quite sometime.
Hi Turinturumbar. Welcome to Planet Tolkien.

In short, the answer to your question is yes, this is the same ring. It is called the Ring of Barahir. If you wish to know more, I wrote a brief history of this ring in a thread Ring of Barahir in the Silmirillion section.
This link should take you there.
Ring of Barahir
Would I be correct in assuming that the Ring of Barahir is the oldest artifact left in Middle-Earth at the end of the 3rd Age? It seems to get relatively little attention in LOTR, when you think about the history and symbolism behind it.
The Ring of Barahir was made for Finrod by the Noldor in Valinor. That means it was made prior to the start of the First Age because the First Age began when the Noldor returned to Middle Earth. It is just possible, that Narsil may be older. Narsil was forged by Telchar the Dwarf, who during the Third Age of the Captivity of Melkor ( before the destruction of the Two Trees), gave advice to Thingol concerning the forging of weapons. Narsil might also predate the First Age, therefore.

The Noldor had been many long years in Valinor before returning to Middle Earth, however, and as Telchar was still around in the First Age, he couldn't have been around more than a few hundred years before it. Narsil, then, must have been forged sometime within a few centuries of the start of the First Age, while the Ring of Barahir could have been far older.
Thanks! It boggles the mind to think of Aragorn walking around with two items both well over 6,000 years old.
The technology must have been a bit better than anything we have in the real world. I wouldn't rate anyone's chances of surviving a battle if they were relying on a 6,000 year old bronze age sword.

What I find amazing is how Aragorn's line has survived so long unbroken, and can still be traced. To put it in perspective the English monarchy goes back to Egbert of Wessex (802-839), the grandfather of Alfred the Great. In just 1200 years, though, that line has been broken on several occasions, and has frequently only survived through cousins etc. It is little wonder Sauron assumed the line was broken.
Yes, it's one thing I think Tolkien doesn't quite make enough of - that to the people of Gondor (and everyone else) the idea that the King should return was just beyond credible belief. How would we react if someone from Cornwall could suddenly proove his bloodline pre-dated even the Celtic invasion of the British Isles, let alone the Romans, Anglo-Saxons etc, and had some heirlooms hanging around to prove his rightful lordship of the country?
As for ancient objects, let me point out the Palantiri that might even have been made by Feanor.
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As for ancient objects, let me point out the Palantiri that might even have been made by Feanor.


Well, actually that's a known fact; just another great thing conceived by the genius of Feanor. *couldn't help myself there: they were practically asking for the "how Feanor was the greatest" dose*
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Well, actually that's a known fact; just another great thing conceived by the genius of Fanor.
Yes, in the Index to The Silmarillion it states:
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Palantiri 'Those that watch from afar', the seven Seeing Stones brought by Elendil and his sons from Numenor; made by Fanor in Aman.
My paperback copy goes on to misquote the page number where this can be found. The actual text from three pages into Chapter 6 'Of and the Unchaining of Melkor' reads:
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The first gems that Fanor made were white and colourless, but being set under starlight they would blaze with blue and silver fires brighter than Helluin, and other crystals he made also, wherein things far away could be seen small but clear, as with the eyes of the eagles of Manw. Seldom were the hands and mind of Fanor at rest.
(The above emphasis is mine)

In The Two Towers , Book III, five pages before the end of Chapter 11, 'The Palantir', Gandalf explains to Pippin what the Palantiri are, and that they weren't created by the enemy, that:
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The palantiri came from beyond Westernesse, from Eldamar. The Noldor made them. Fanor himself maybe, wrought them in days so long ago that the time cannot me measured in years.
This text is probably the source of Shaya puma conjecture. And remember, Gandalf did not have the text from The Silmarillion at his finger tips, and he had quite a lot of other things on his mind at the time so he can be forgiven for not making a concise statement of fact. Besides, so much time had passed that even the wise among the elves may have unsure.

(Oops these past few posts should have gone under a palantiri thread.)
Yep, lots of things so ancient. I hadn't really paid much attention to the ring of Barahir until it was seen in the movie, but when I read the Sil. I found it had quite an interesting story. Boy am I so jealous of Aragorn... Very Big Grin Smilie
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I hadn't really paid much attention to the ring of Barahir until it was seen in the movie,

Ah yes, another error. We see Barfagorn wearing it, but it should be on Arwen's finger really, as Aragorn gave it to her as a token of his love in T.A. 2980 on the hill of Cerin Amroth.
Naw, what what he gave her back then was a White Owl cigar band. Elf Winking Smilie
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Naw, what what he gave her back then was a White Owl cigar band.

Bleh, another proof that HoME stinks ! Very Big Grin Smilie
Oh yeah... I forgot he gave her the ring as a love token...
Well in the movies it never looked like he loved her anyway, so let's give PJ the benefit of the doubt.
What's the HoME got to do with White Owl cigars?
And also, Aragorn totally loved Arwen in the movies!!! He was practically drooling over her (sorry about the pun)
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And also, Aragorn totally loved Arwen in the movies!!! He was practically drooling over her (sorry about the pun)

No he didn't. He even sent her away to the Grey Havens in TTT, the schmuck.

Besides, he was drooling more on owyn and Lurtz than on Arwen.
Hahaha... yeah, Eowyn , I sorta forgot about her. But I'd say she was drooling on him more.