Login | Register
 
Message Board | Latest Posts | Your Recent Posts | Rules

Thread: Has anyone read either Silmarillion parody?

Is this discussion interesting? Share it on Twitter!

Bottom of Page    Message Board > The Silmarillion > Has anyone read either Silmarillion parody?   
There are two Silmarillion parodies, but I don't know if either are in print. One is titled [u:s401zjuf]The Sillymarillion[/u:s401zjuf] and the other [u:s401zjuf]The Sellamillion[/u:s401zjuf]. I haven't read either, but I'm interested in anyone's comments before I do so.

It took me a LONG time to read [u:s401zjuf]The Silmarillion[/u:s401zjuf]. I got it as a gift when it was first published, but I wasn't able to read it until a few years ago. I enjoyed it, if not as much as [u:s401zjuf]The Hobbit[/u:s401zjuf] or [u:s401zjuf]LOTR[/u:s401zjuf]. There was a lot that was very interesting and moving. I have similar issues with [u:s401zjuf]The Bible[/u:s401zjuf].

I look forward to any comments!
I haven't heard of those parodies before Paul. Did you come across them online? If so, can you post a link?

[b:276g0kps]GB[/b:276g0kps]
I tried reading The Silmarilion at the age of 11. I took it from my Dads bookcase. Bad mistake! <img src='/images/smileys/smile.gif' border='0' alt='Smile Smilie' /> I have read it now, but in parts so not to tire myself out!

Anyway here is a descriptopn of the [url=http://www.amazon.com/Sillymarillion-Unauthorized-Tolkiens-Classic-Silmarillion/dp/1593600259:13no6v7i]The Sillymarillion[/url:13no6v7i]

Seems quite good.
Thanks for the link, Ally! Here's the other one, GB: [url:3rbkq8pd]http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=the+sellamillion&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=1710437861&ref=pd_sl_w830zbtac_e[/url:3rbkq8pd]. [u:3rbkq8pd]The Sellamillion[/u:3rbkq8pd] is by A. Roberts, who also wrote another parody in 2003 called [u:3rbkq8pd]The Soddit[/u:3rbkq8pd]. It's quite a bit different than my parody. It wasn't published in the U.S., I think because it written for a British audience. Jokes about Welsh accents and Noel Coward and so forth.

I was just curious about whether any of these parodies are cult classics among fans. [u:3rbkq8pd]Bored Of The Rings[/u:3rbkq8pd] was, but that was a long time ago. Perhaps this is my chance to fill a need in the market?
I saw [i:yo4y1gv9]The Sillymarillion[/i:yo4y1gv9] on Amazon before but I didn't buy it (just [i:yo4y1gv9]Bored of the Rings[/i:yo4y1gv9]). I didn't know there was another one.
I haven't seen any of them - and I don't want to! <img src='/images/smileys/bigsmile.gif' border='0' alt='Big Smile Smilie' />
Party Pooper! :P

[b:2hh0d2iy]GB[/b:2hh0d2iy]
The good news for me is that with two Silmarillion parodies in print, as well as The Soddit (2003) as well as Bored Of The Rings, it seems unlikely that MY parody would get singled out for legal action by the Tolkien estate. Can anyone introduce me to a reliable literary agent?
Well Parody falls under the Fair Use clause, which has well established judicial precedents in the US. So you shouldn't have any problems from that quarter Paul.

As to literary agents, if any of us knew the answer to that, we would no doubt be rolling in the dough from the enormous sales of our respective stories. :lol:

[b:oqdw9znp]GB[/b:oqdw9znp]
If everyone on this Forum was to send me a thousand dollars each, I could self publish my book - but I'm guessing you're all too selfish to do that! :x
Odo, your plan sounds like the one Max Bialystock had in [u:13r25341]The Producers[/u:13r25341], where he sells hundreds of 50% shares of his doomed musical [u:13r25341]Springtime For Hitler[/u:13r25341], with the plan of taking all the extra cash and fleeing to Rio de Janeiro. Why didn't I think of that? I'm not going to get anywhere at three dollars a download! Maybe if I sell it through Kindle...
Yes -- and I'm not ashamed to piggyback on the back of your solid book promotion efforts either. Writing is a business all said and done, and Business is Hell! (Or was that "War is Hell "? Same thing, I guess).
I think GB is correct and you would be able to make a successful case in court, but the Tolkien Estate tends to be pretty cool with fan works (including the much more legally questionable realm of fanfiction) so I doubt it would come to that, especially with [i:fjy7u2e2]Bored of the Rings[/i:fjy7u2e2] being in print for nearly half a century.
Fan-fiction is only legally questionable if you try to sell it. Though a few authors step over the judicial line in a misguided effort to keep their works from being "sullied" as it were. They really have very little legal ground to move against fan-fic authors (though that doesn't stop them from trying), and are only hurting themselves when they piss off fans of their works.

The distinction between Parody and Fan-Fiction is that Fan-Fics make use of the actual characters, themes, and settings of the original author's creation. Parodies [i:37y4d0lu][b:37y4d0lu]alter[/b:37y4d0lu][/i:37y4d0lu] many aspects of an original work in order to Spoof it, and can therefore in no way be misconstrued as being a product of the original author.

[b:37y4d0lu]GB[/b:37y4d0lu]
Does anyone think that the copyright holders of "Bored of the Rings" have any case to sue me? I am writing a book called "Bored of Bored of the Rings". A spoof of a parody. <img src='/images/smileys/smile.gif' border='0' alt='Smile Smilie' />

I'd think that freely distributed fan fiction is accepted, but If you were selling it you would have to contact the copyright holders and get permission. You don't want to be sued! At least that's what I assumed (I used to read and write a lot of fanfic, and that's what I was told). GB is right though, I doubt many authors care about fan-fiction. To quote: [quote:2sd2upzj]Most writers, songwriters and film-makers have got enough sense to realise that the writing of fanfic is an integral part of an active fandom. Who is going to be so foolish as to try to shut down a fan activity?[/quote:2sd2upzj] If anyone parodied or spoofed any book I ever wrote, I would be chuffed! I'd probably buy a copy!
GB- I agree. It would be a copyright violation to create new stories with Tolkien's characters or places, but a parody that spoofs those things is (in theory) okay. Published "mash-ups" where monsters are thrown into a classic story, like [u:3nkf8e95]Pride And Prejudice And Zombies[/u:3nkf8e95] or [u:3nkf8e95]Android Karenina[/u:3nkf8e95] have to use public domain works to avoid legal action. That's why their publisher, Quirk Classics, uses the motto is "The Masters Of Our Public Domain." A mash-ups putting Harry Potter into a story with the Twilight kids (ouch) would never be legally publishable, but might do well as fan fiction.

So Odo and I can seek publication of our respective parodies.

Ally-

A parody of a parody? I don't know! I guess the scenario I gave above still applies, and it would be publishable if it were a pure spoof. From a comedic standpoint though, I would think it would be difficult to spoof a spoof. That's why there are so few spoofs of pro wrestling or the Adam West [u:3nkf8e95]Batman[/u:3nkf8e95] TV show. They are already self-parodies. Still, you've made me curious about [u:3nkf8e95]Bored Of The Bored Of The Rings[/u:3nkf8e95]!
[quote="Paul Erickson":1dcllies]GB- I agree. It would be a copyright violation to create new stories with Tolkien's characters or places, but a parody that spoofs those things is (in theory) okay. Published "mash-ups" where monsters are thrown into a classic story, like [u:1dcllies]Pride And Prejudice And Zombies[/u:1dcllies] or [u:1dcllies]Android Karenina[/u:1dcllies] have to use public domain works to avoid legal action. That's why their publisher, Quirk Classics, uses the motto is "The Masters Of Our Public Domain." A mash-ups putting Harry Potter into a story with the Twilight kids (ouch) would never be legally publishable, but might do well as fan fiction.

So Odo and I can seek publication of our respective parodies.

Ally-

A parody of a parody? I don't know! I guess the scenario I gave above still applies, and it would be publishable if it were a pure spoof. From a comedic standpoint though, I would think it would be difficult to spoof a spoof. That's why there are so few spoofs of pro wrestling or the Adam West [u:1dcllies]Batman[/u:1dcllies] TV show. They are already self-parodies. Still, you've made me curious about [u:1dcllies]Bored Of The Bored Of The Rings[/u:1dcllies]![/quote:1dcllies]

When I thought up the joke, it was actually a joke. But now I am not so sure! Maybe if everybody here gave me 1000, I could publish it on my own, and send everybody a copy for free!*



*That's only when it becomes a best seller mind. I am not made of money, plus some of you live miles away. That's a small fortune in P&P!
[quote="Gandalfs Beard":3tz93kki]Fan-fiction is only legally questionable if you try to sell it. Though a few authors step over the judicial line in a misguided effort to keep their works from being "sullied" as it were. They really have very little legal ground to move against fan-fic authors (though that doesn't stop them from trying), and are only hurting themselves when they piss off fans of their works.[/quote:3tz93kki]

I've heard both - do you know if there have been any cases that were actually brought to court? That could shed some more light on this. :ugeek:

Regardless of the legal question though, I fully agree with your other points. I don't understand why authors would be averse to fans expressing their love of a work, especially since it can bring more exposure and readers to the original. :roll:
Eldo-

There are two cases that I've been told about. One was [u:8piscvvp]The Wind Done Gone[/u:8piscvvp], a re-telling of Margaret Mitchell's [u:8piscvvp]Gone With The Wind[/u:8piscvvp] from the perspective of one of the slaves. The other was when JD Salinger filed a lawsuit against another writer for copyright infringement resulting from that writer's use of one of characters story from [u:8piscvvp]Catcher In The Rye[/u:8piscvvp].

The Salinger case seems to be a clear violation, creating a new work with someone else's characters. I don't know how it turned out. Here's a quote from Wikipedia about the Mitchell case: "The estate of Margaret Mitchell sued Randall and her publishing company, Houghton Mifflin, on the grounds that [u:8piscvvp]The Wind Done Gone[/u:8piscvvp] was too similar to [u:8piscvvp]Gone with the Wind[/u:8piscvvp], thus infringing its copyright. The case attracted numerous comments from leading scholars, authors, and activists, regarding what Mitchell's attitudes would have been, and how much [u:8piscvvp]The Wind Done Gone[/u:8piscvvp] copies from its predecessor. After the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit vacated an injunction against publishing the book in Suntrust v. Houghton Mifflin (2001), the case was settled in 2002 when Houghton Mifflin agreed to make an unspecified donation to Morehouse College, a historically African American college in Atlanta, Georgia, in exchange for Mitchell's estate dropping the litigation. The cover of the book bears a seal identifying it as "The Unauthorized Parody." It is parody in the broad legal sense: a work that comments on or criticizes a prior work. This characterization was important in the Suntrust case. However, the book is not a comedy, as the term "parody" would imply in its common usage."

All this notwithstanding, I'm looking at those other four parodies (written without permission from the Tolkien estate, as far as I know) as an indication that no one's going to take away my 401k when [u:8piscvvp]The Wobbit[/u:8piscvvp] becomes a monster hit. Did I mention that the PDF is available through my website for only $3.00 via PayPal?
That suggests to me that fan-fiction is in a legal grey area (at least if the copyright holder chooses to pursue a complaint), though that may only apply to for-profit fan-fiction. In any event, I'm sure you will be safe with your parody. <img src='/images/smileys/wink.gif' border='0' alt='Wink Smilie' />