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Thread: whatever happened to Tar-Aldarion?

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The only mention of his death that I can find, is that he died on his last voyage to MiddleEarth. He would have been 375 when he died so it is quite possible that he died of old age. His father, Tar Meneldur lived for 399 years and the three preceeding kings had lasted until sometime in their 400's. Elros had just exceeded 500 when he died, so it can be seen that as their elven blood thinned, their life spans quickly shortened.
I think if he'd been killed or drowned, Tolkien would probably have mentioned it.
No it states that he was one of the kings of Numenor who laid down there lives when they grew weary of the world.
Not only elven blood Val, they have ainu blood to....NOW THAT YOU GOT TO HAVE TO BE HIPP Big Laugh Smilie
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Not only elven blood Val, they have ainu blood to
That is true, Aule, and in the grand scheme of things I think that lineage is of more importance that their elven blood.
Yep....I believe that too....The lineage of the ainu blood was the more important part....that was what made them so freaking powerful....that is what I think...
there all the children of the Eru whether Ainur, Elves or Human. It doesn't matter where there blood comes from. The Valar apart from Melkor didn't really live as non of them feared any thing!
I donīt follow you here Ross....what do you mean?
Sure they are all created by Ilķvatar.....but there is a difference between the ainur and elves and men.....the ainur were Erusī offspring in thought.....they are never refered as Erusī children.......but the elves, men and dwarves are(the dwarves was adopted by Eru so they are his children to).......the ainur were more powerful than any other creatures except Eru....they were holy spirits....
They were all created by the Eru's thought, even the Dwarves, Ents, Orcs and such like being that he knows everything that is, has and will happen. All his children were powerful in their own right, however only Melkor and possibly Sauron learned to live because of the fact they learned to fear for them selves, therefore being able to embrace life, or in their cases trying to either conqueor or destroy life in order to keep theirs safe. Otherwise do you think when Sauron was destroyed for the last time he would have gone to Aman to beg for his spirit, do you think Morgorth would have feigned rehabilitation in order to be freed of bondage. No they wouldn't. The fact that the Elves join the Ainur at the end and the fact that they can out preform the Ainur in some areas shows that they are just as equal and this is the reason the Elves did not worship the Ainur as gods. The Humans have a different fate set aside for them, that all the elves and even the ainur fear and envy, making them also just as powertful as the Ainur and Elves, it was only through the corruption of Morgorth towards Humans that they began to fear this blessing and begin to worship the Ainur and to a lesser extent the Elves as gods or holy beings, because they had developed a fear of death!
yup...you are right Ross....now that you put it THAT way....
Yes now that you mentioned it , the elves and the Ainur cosidered death was a gift given to Men by Eru , and elves always envied men for that gift, while men envied elves for their imortality, or so it seemed that they were imortal because they weren't, they aged very slowly together with Arda Cool Smilie
Yeah. Makes Death seem more nice and cuddly, don't it? A gift. Not a eeeeeew thing. Makes you feel so much better, doesn't it?
Well consider this Loni:

The gift of men makes you wanna live life to the fullest: you get the best out of it. Short, but well lived.
The elves have mortality so basically they see the worlds around them change and even decline.

From the Letters of Tolkien 113:

.. we see a sort of second fall or at least 'error' of the Elves. There was nothing wrong essentially in their lingering against council, still sadly with the mortal lands of their heroic deeds. But they wanted to have their cake without eating it. They wanted the 'peace' and bliss and perfect memory of the West, and yet to remain on the ordinary world where their prestige as the highest people, above wild Elves, dwarves, and Men, was greater at the bottom of the hierarchy of Valinor. They
thus became obsessed with 'fading', the mode in which the changes of time (the law of the world under the sun) was perceived by them. They became sad, and their art (shall we say) antiquarian, and their efforts all really a kind of embalming - even though they also retained the old motive of their kind, the adonment of earth, and the healing of its hurts.

And in letter 144:

But I suppose that the Quendi (other word for Elves S.) are in fact in these hisories very little akin to the Elves and Fairies of Europe; and if I were pressed to rationalize, I should say that they represent really men with greatly enhanced aesthetic and creative functions, greater beauty and long life, and nobility - the Elder children (of Illuvatar S.), doomed to fade before the Followers (Men), and to live ultimately only by the thin line of their blood that was mingled with that of Men, among whom it was the only real claim to 'nobility'.

Nah, I'd rather have the gift of Death then the fate of the Elves. Being an Edain just sounds and feels more fun!
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Nah, I'd rather have the gift of Death then the fate of the Elves. Being an Edain just sounds and feels more fun!

I agree. Forever young and pretty and smart... Not to mention the yummy looking elf men to flirt with. But you would also see people you get to know and the world around you wither and die before your eyes. Memories doesn't fade, you remember every good thing but also every bad thing like they happened yesterday... No, I don't want to live forever.
It's funny you say that Amie, not that I disagree with you. I don't want to live forever either. But, I always wondered about those old fashioned bad guys from fantasy tales "Muhahahaha, I'm going to be immortal"!! Sheeesh!!
Well, those guys like destruction and death (as long as it isn't themselves that get destroyed and killed) so I guess immortality sounds pretty good to them.
Mmm the Kings Men at Nķmenor? Ar-PharazŰn and his fools errand? They wanted to be Edain and yet claim immortality. Ah no, men have tried, but got punished.

I think the elves themselves called the Valar gods but meaning it in a lesser way, not deities, powerful and able to do awesome things.

We as mortals outside of Middle-Earth have for the most part a fear of death and so we cannot see what a blessing death was as men did unless through some trauma they would get the sense this was not a blessing.

I don't agree that the Valar and such had not started living until these t hings were introduced as they were already enjoying life in a grand way before entering the music.  And, Melkor had no enemies at the beginning so he had nothing to fight against and his life was wonderful. It was his utter selfish that began to form in his thought that caused ruin to others. And to me, it is like saying Ross that one must cut off a finger to enjoy the others, to really begin to live and such. I just cannot agree with your take on this

I believe that the strongest message in all of Tolkien's work is that of Death and Man's innate fear of it and where that fear originally came from.  Anyone who knows anything about the Prof's early life knows that Death played a huge part in it.  Whether untimely family misfortune or the hideous 1st World War and then the 2nd, JRRT was surrounded by Death in a way that few of us will ever know.  I see an amazing message in his examples of how Melkor poisoned the minds of Men in many areas, but especially about Death.  One of my favourite lines from the Prof concerns the evils of Melkor (paraphrased) " He who sews lies shall not want of a harvest" And despite Melkor's demise his harvest went on to grow and bloom through Sauron and on and on until modern days.  Most of us are terrified of Death, even in modern times yet hope remains for those who realise that the natural cycle of life goes on and we are all part of it.  So let’s make the most of life with love and understanding of others.

I think that this undeveloped story could have been one of Tolkien's greatest masterpieces, right alongside tales like that of Beren and Luthien.  It's a shame that he never finished it.  As to what happened to Aldarion, I like to think that he eventually reconciled with his wife and they lived happily ever after.  But of course, I suppose that's just wishful thinking, and far too easy of a solution.

I think that this undeveloped story could have been one of Tolkien's greatest masterpieces, right alongside tales like that of Beren and Luthien.  It's a shame that he never finished it.  As to what happened to Aldarion, I like to think that he eventually reconciled with his wife and they lived happily ever after.  But of course, I suppose that's just wishful thinking, and far too easy of a solution.

I agree, Kyelek. I liked the story of Aldarion and Erendis and I'd love to read the full ending - as detailed as at least some parts of the story. I find this particular story quite fresh - the character of Erendis is unlike any other female characters from Tolkien's universe I read about. And of course the place of the events is unique.