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Thread: Dark Lords and Aule

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I wanted to ask for your opinions on this for such a long time. The thought came to me when I was reading "The Unfinished Tales" some time ago. There was a note in the book that makes me wonder if there's a substantial connection between the fact that majority of the evil lords from the books were somehow related to Aule.

I also realised that all almost of Melkor's servants and successors were particularly drawn to the valuables: Sauron (Aulendil), dragons, powerful Men who became Nazgul, Feanor, Gollum, Saruman.

I was wondering if the fact that Aule wanted to create his own race, without Eru's consent affected the fate of those who were related to him. I can see a connection here, but I find it hard to describe. It's like Aule's ability to push the boundaries set by Eru a bit too far (even if he sincerely regretted this afterwards) made those, who served him or were worshipping him particularly easier to break and to corrupt. I know that the Dwarves woudn't match the scheme I am suggesting here (beside the fact they were stubborn and sometimes greedy).

Anyway, here's part of the note:

(...)Sauron endeavoured to keep distinct his two sides: enemyand tempter. When he came among the Noldor he adopted a specious fair form (a kind of simulated anticipation of the later Istari and a fair name: Artano"high-smith," or Aulendil, meaning one who is devoted to the service of the Vala Aulë. (In Of the Rings of Power, the name that Sauron gave to himself at this time was Annatar, the Lord of Gifts; but that name is not mentioned here.) The note goes on to say that Galadriel was not deceived, saying that this Aulendil was not in the train of Aulë in Valinor, "but this is not decisive, since Aulë existed before the 'Building of Arda,' and the probability is that Sauron was infact one of the Aulëan Maiar, corrupted 'before Arda began' by Melkor." With this compare the opening sentences in Of the Rings of Power: "Of old there was Sauron the Maia. ...In the beginning of Arda Melkor seduced him to his allegiance."

Saruman, known also as Curumo (or Curunir) was Aule's servant during the time he was in Valinor. After he came to Arda he was known as "Man of Skill", particularly interested in smith-craft. He became jealous of Gandalf when he discovered that Gandalf has one of the three Elvish rings, because he was longing for one.

Sauron was one of the Aule's Maiar before he was corrupted by Melkor and became his servant. He used names related to Aule, when he was trying to misguide the elves. He was also active under the name of Annatar (Lord of Gifts) which suggests he was willing to bribe people. He chose a ring to be an ultimate tool of ultimate power.

The Ring of course attracted Gollum, who perceived it as "prescious birthday gift".

Dragons were known for their attraction to treasures. Of course Smaug is an excellent example of that. They obviously weren't able to make jewelry or other things by themselves, but when they were attacking places they were often choosing places known for their wealth. They loved to collect those goods.

Feanor was the most outstanding gem-smith the Arda knew, and his passion for Silmarills led to a lot of tragedies.

Interesting Indis. I think Tolkien uses Aule as an example of what Melkor could have been if greed and pride had not destroyed him and brought on his downfall.

Aule never coverted his creations and gave away his art and skill freely and therefore Eru rewarded him. Melkor was jealous of his and others power and used it against Eru's plan as he wanted to control rather than add to the beauty of Arda.

I think everyone should learn from these stories as in real life sharing leads to peace and happiness.

It's all because of the "Curse of Aule" Check my post from a different topic. In that case, it was concerning Feanor.

People tend to be hard on Feanor, when he was just a few that had "the curse of Aule" , the lust for creation ending in betrayal. All of whom was in relation of Aule in one way or another.

1. Aule: created the dwarves, therefore betrayed Eru and Yavanna.

2. Sauron: created the One Ring, even though his betrayal of the Valar was before he created the ring.

3. Feanor: created the Silmarils, resulting in the kinslaying.

4. Celebrimbor: created the rings of power, although didn't betrayed intentionally, the end results were the same. Was tortured and revealed the location of the rings, resulting in the death of many

5. Saruman: created machines of war, betraying Fangorn Forest by burning it down. wanting to create order upon middle earth under his rule, betrayed the white council

 

I made up the curse of course but I always thought it was interesting about their connections.

 

In this case we can also say that Melkor was corrupted because he lust for creation as well.

 

 

Melkor is an interesting case. He had all the other Valar's powers but lack the uniqueness of each of the Valar. I'll try to explain it so it makes more sense. He was greater than the other Valar  when it comes to smithwork, except Aule. He was mightier than the others in fighting/combat, even greater than Manwe, but was less in might compare to Tulkas. Melkor didn't have a uniqueness of his own. I guess the whole time he was just trying to find something special about himself resulting in being alone. Which in result caused him to be jealous of the others because he couldn't find it and thought he didn't have one. Although he never realized it, his uniqueness was that he was blessed with all the skills of the other Valars.

Glorfindal, I think the major difference between Aule, Celebrimbor Feanor and The 2 Dark Lords is the fact that their creations were made to highlight the beauty and or preserve the perfection of Eru's creations, not to control and or own them. There are subtlties in Tolkien's stories regarding creation and even Fell Feanor originally, as did Aule, create their masterpieces to add to Eru's grand plan not to detract from it.

I think Tolkien uses Aule as an example of what Melkor could have been if greed and pride had not destroyed him and brought on his downfall.

I also got this feeling a few times when I was reading Silmarillion, Brego Smile Smilie I'd say that in the very beginning the will to create (in both cases - Aule's and Melkor's) had the same origins - they both were willing to create something unique, something they could feel connected with but their intentions were so different. The most visible reason why Aule was succesfull and Melkor became the opportunist is the pride in my opinion.

I made up the curse of course but I always thought it was interesting about their connections.

And I thought I'm probably reading too far into it. But your observation makes perfect sense to me. Too bad there's no possibility to find all those little gems (like your point about 'the curse'Wink Smilie in various threads.

Melkor is an interesting case. He had all the other Valar's powers but lack the uniqueness of each of the Valar. I'll try to explain it so it makes more sense. He was greater than the other Valar  when it comes to smithwork, except Aule. He was mightier than the others in fighting/combat, even greater than Manwe, but was less in might compare to Tulkas. Melkor didn't have a uniqueness of his own. I guess the whole time he was just trying to find something special about himself resulting in being alone. Which in result caused him to be jealous of the others because he couldn't find it and thought he didn't have one. Although he never realized it, his uniqueness was that he was blessed with all the skills of the other Valars.

Another great observation here, Glorfindel. Just brilliant.

Maeglin could also be included in this. He built stronger weapons than had ever been seen before, and designed the seventh gate of Gondolin, but he later betrayed the city to its destruction.