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Thread: Farmer Giles of Ham

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Is it the story of the farmer subduing the dragon Chrysophylax? I liked his sword, Talibiter(I think), it is so cool! It is like a longsword with a +10 against dragons(Sorry about the dnd reference...) It was not bad although I thought it was too short.
How did I miss this thread?

I loved the wee book and could really relate with Garm, Giles' cowardly dog. It was a fun story, even the many pen and ink illustrations were fun. Cool Elf Smilie
At last somebody answers the question Smile Smilie
Farmer Giles of Ham was first published in 1949. Both The Hobbit and Leaf by Niggle were published prior to Farmer Giles of Ham.

Im not sure which story was written first.

I enjoyed Farmer Giles of Ham to no end, Garm was delightful and the taming of Chrysophylax was sensational!

My copy of Farmer Giles of Ham is in Tales from the perilous realm which also contains Leaf By Niggle, Smith of Wootton Major and The Adventures of Tom Bombadil. So far, Farmer Giles of Ham is my favourite tale.
I am just reading Farmer Giles of Ham. It is wonderful, I love it! Mad, I also like Caudimordax (isn't that it's full name?). And the pen and ink drawings in mine are lovely, by Pauline Baynes.
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I am just reading Farmer Giles of Ham. It is wonderful, I love it! Mad, I also like Caudimordax (isn't that it's full name?). And the pen and ink drawings in mine are lovely, by Pauline Baynes.
Yes, Caudimordax is the full name of
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"... the famous sword that in popular romances is more vulgarly called Tailbiter. ... This sword ... will not stay sheathed if a dragon is within five miles; and without a doubt in a brave man's hands no dragon can resist it."

- From Farmer Giles of Ham
It's good book I first read it on an airplane, and it caused me to spill my soda Very Sad Smilie
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It's good book I first read it on an airplane, and it caused me to spill my soda Very Sad Smilie
Would you like to explain how this came about or is it too embarrasing? Elf Winking Smilie
We had little table things that out of the chairs. and I had a little cup witch I had my Soda in so the pilot was rising to find some smoother air and, we hit some turbulance and, the book hit the soda a spilt it.
I was not sure wether read it or not...but thanx to you guys I will startit soon(if I find the money to buy it from my parents... Sad Smilie ) Thanx to all!!
I really love the book! Mainly Garm, AEgidius' dog. My sign is a part of the text that talks about Garm, but it is in portuguese...
I thought it was funny. I read the anniversary edition and wished he would have made a sequel.
WAAA! I've read it about seven times and love it but it was a library copy and there are no copies for me to buy in Whitcoulls except the silly ones with no nice illustrations!!!!!!
(But at least I didn't spill my soda reading it!)
Farmer Giles of Ham is one of my favorite Tolkien stories. It is amazingly well written and it has the 'Tolkien Story-Telling Mode' which i love. My copy of Farmer Giles of Ham is also in a copy of Tales From The Perilous Realm and does not have the ink illustrations..
I've also got Tales From The Perilous Realm , and Farmer Giles of Ham is really a sweet story, if I may say so. I think the dragon was rather cool, and the dog... wonderful. Tolkien was a genius, but whom do I have to tell that?
I can't believe I have never replied in this thread.
Farmer Giles was great; I love his sword, but who could forget the dog.
I need to dig my copy out and read it again.
Sometime this past year I had to replace my original 1970 paperback edition of Ballentine's The Tolkien Reader which contains this and other stories, poems, and a play and an essay, with a new copy ISBN 0-345-34506-1. My original cost $0.95 US, while the new one cost $6.95 US. Anyway I still consider it was well worth the price, especially as it has all those pen and ink illustrations by Pauline Baynes.
I can't believe I just found this thread either. I mean, a +10 sword? Please. The highest you'll ever see in AD&D is a +6, and 99% of those are in the hands of munchkins.

Meanwhile, Farmer Giles is a great story I need to reread along with Smith since they're conveniently located in the same book.
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... I mean, a +10 sword? Please. The highest you'll ever see in AD&D is a +6, and 99% of those are in the hands of munchkins.
This munckin used a +10 shortsword and a +10 rapier each with other magic bonuses and which cost about one million GP to upgrade. My level 27 Epic Ranger needed these to overcome the power and might of Mephistopheles in Neverwinter Nights: Hoards of the Underdark on my PC. Normally would rather play up to level seven characters, but once in a while it can be fun to play an almost devine one. And I still hate all mage-type spells above level 4. There are too darned many spells in these games, especially when you only need about ten-twenty of the 300 some spells you have to wade through.

Smith of Wootton Major isn't included in the above Tolkien Reader; I have had to get that charming faerie tale via Smith of Wootton Major & Farmer Giles of Ham ISBN 0-345-33606-2
Didn't anyone but me think the farmer spoke rather meanly to the dog, all those threats. He didn't seem that kind to him. Poor poor doggy. Smile Smilie
But Garm was a cowardly braggart who instead of helping his master, wanted to hide under the bed and then after the trouble was over, to brag about his part in it to any who would listen. Or at least that is how I remember him.
well that is how I remember it too, but really, one wrong doesn't correct another now does it? Big Smile Smilie
I think a good juicy bone and some words of encouragement would have done the trick rather nicer, don't you think? At any rate I thought the story quite thrilling and funny.