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Thread: Parralells

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Lord of the Rings - Harry potter
Sauron - Voldemort
Shelob - Aragog
Gandalv - Dumbledore
Wormtounge - Wormtail
Merry & Pippin - Fred & George
The Ringswraths - The Dementors
Troll in Moria - Troll in the dungeon

Do some of you got more?

Not bad. But the Lord of the Rings is Sauron.. Wink Smilie

The quenya word for snake is hlókë or lókë , Loke was one of the Norse gods (half-god) and he was quite sneaky. He lied and played tricks on the other gods and was the father of the huge snake that layed curled around Middle-Earth swollowing ships that went to close to the egde. I find that quite amusing. Big Smile Smilie
He probably did. Silly me. Wink Smilie
I find parralells between Tolkien and every fantasy book I read now, I mean wasn't Tolkien the maker of the word 'Orc'? I see orcs in everything now.
I know.The orcs are in so many video games today. Like the Warcraft games and many R-P games.

[Edited on 21/1/2003 by Einar]
Quote:
I find parralells between Tolkien and every fantasy book I read now, I mean wasn't Tolkien the maker of the word 'Orc'? I see orcs in everything now

From Tolkien's Letter #144
Quote:
Orcs (the word is as far as I am concerned actually derived from Old English orc 'demon', but only because of its phonetic suitability) are nowhere clearly stated to be of any particular origin. Burt since they are servants of the Dark Power, and later of Sauron, neither of whom could, or would, produce living things, they must be 'corruptions'. They are not based on direct experience of mine; but owe, I suppose, a good deal to teh goblin tradition ( goblin is used as a translation in The Hobbit, where orconly occurs once, I think), especially as it appears in George Macdonald, except for the soft feet which I never believed in.


So I think Tolkien was probably the first to use the word 'orc' in fantasy fiction as we know it, but he did not coin the word, nor the concept, since he has based them on the goblins created in MacDonald's tales.
In Norweagian mythology, there are some creatures called "Jotner". And from paintings, they look and acts like orcs. and since Master Tolkien study mythology, it seems logical that he got inspiration from these creature.

(or pherhaps not!)
Quote:

From Tolkien's Letter #144
Quote:
Orcs (the word is as far as I am concerned actually derived from Old English orc 'demon', but only because of its phonetic suitability) are nowhere clearly stated to be of any particular origin. Burt since they are servants of the Dark Power, and later of Sauron, neither of whom could, or would, produce living things, they must be 'corruptions'. They are not based on direct experience of mine; but owe, I suppose, a good deal to teh goblin tradition ( goblin is used as a translation in The Hobbit, where orconly occurs once, I think), especially as it appears in George Macdonald, except for the soft feet which I never believed in.


It's interesting you brought this up, Nell, because I was reading another letter in which Tolkien was pointing out mistakes in a screenplay for Lord of the Rings by Zimmerman. Tolkien complains because Z. put wings and beaks on the orcs, because 'orc' resembled the word 'auk', a type of bird.
This is an interesting topic Lurtz, you always seem to be thinking up good threads! Wink Smilie
Thank you Sam!
Its a gift! Big Laugh Smilie
Lord of the Rings(and other Tolkien stuff) - Star Wars
Sauron - Darth Vader
Morgoth - Darth Sidius
Saruman - Count Dooku (now isn't that a coincidence)
Gandalf - Obi Wan Kenobi
Frodo - Luke Skywalker (they were both orphans and lived with their uncles)
Aragorn - Han Solo
Arwen - Leia
Tom Bombadil - Yoda (okay so I'm grasping at straws with this one)
Sam - R2D2
Merry & Pippin - C3P0 & Jar Jar Binks (ack - perish the thought)
Gollum - Buba Fet (actually in looks Gollum is more like to Yoda)
Cave troll - Jaba the Hut
Boromir - Lando (you know that guy in charge of the city in the clouds)
Hobbits - Ewoks (well at least Hobbits are short and have fury feet)
Gimli - Chewi (Ha Ha - just kidding)

You'll have to forgive my spelling on the Star Wars side - Hey I can only be compulsively obsessed with one great story.
Big Laugh Smilie Big Laugh Smilie Big Laugh Smilie And if you think this post is a little dodgy: it's 3am gimme a break Big Laugh Smilie Big Laugh Smilie Big Laugh Smilie
Well, some of them are a bit thin but overall, I'm rather impressed Arwen*Evenstar*!

I do want to point out that Bilbo and Frodo were actually cousins, though. Wink Smilie
Thanks Prog...If you wanna get technical: Frodo is Bilbo's second cousin once removed. Cool Smilie
When you have a cousin "once removed", what does that actually mean? How does a 'removed' cousin differ from an intact (?) cousin?
Take Frodo's father Drogo and Bilbo, now their fathers were cousins, so Drogo and Bilbo weren't direct cousins, they were cousins once removed. Whereas Bilbo's father's brother's (Bilbo's uncle's) children would have been Bilbo's cousins (directly).
And second cousin means that Frodo is a generation younger than Bilbo.

I hope this makes sense and that I haven't just confused you further. Smile Smilie
eh, geneology always confuses me...guess I wouldn't make a very good hobbit Tongue Smilie
In the Unfinished Tales, when Morgoth makes it so Hurin can see everything on Middle-Earth (to torture him because Hurin will not tell him where Gondolian is), this is sort of similair to a Norse myth. In the myth, Frey climbs in to Odin's high chair, where he can see all nine worlds. This chair is forbidden to anyone but Odin, and as punishment Frey looks into Jotunheim (the land of the giants, enemys of the AEsir) and falls in love with Gerd, a giantess there. Though this punishment is not as severe as the punishment of Hurin (Frey marries Gerd in the end of the story) I find the theme of a high throne where you can see everything common in Tolkien's writing, Manwe and Varda's seats for example. And on the subject of Norse myths, the earth is called Midgard, which is translated 'middle-earth'.