Login | Register
 
Message Board | Latest Posts | Your Recent Posts | Rules

Thread: Test Your Knowledge!

Is this discussion interesting? Share it on Twitter!

Bottom of Page    Message Board > The Ivy Bush > Test Your Knowledge!   
This is a quiz thread. I'll start by asking a question, someone answers it and asks a new one.
The questions can be about pretty much anything, history, science, math; the idea is to get you thinking and test what you know, so try to answer the question without having to look up the information. After your question has been answered, let everyone know if the answer is correct, if not, please give the correct one.
Ok, I like history, so I'll start with a history question:

Napolean Bonaparte marched to Moscow with how many soldiers?

I hope this goes well. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
Quote:
Napolean Bonaparte marched to Moscow with how many soldiers?
50,000? That's probably ten times too low; maybe that's how many returned.

What is the volume of one gallon of liquid water in cubic inches? (Okay, you may assume this at standard conditions rather than near freezing or boiling.)
Use the metric system, by Jove! Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie
I believe a cubic foot equals 1 gallon? A midly educated guess.
Napoleon marched to Moscow with 500,000 men at his back, confident and determined; after capturing Moscow, he headed back to France, having hardly lost anyone. That fatal winter march back home claimed the lives of over 470,000 men. Less than 25,000 made it home. That was the start of his fall.
A cubic foot of water would overflow a five gallon bucket. A gallon is 231 cubic inches while a cubic foot contains 1728 cubic inches. Oh, those are US gallons, not Imperial gallons.

Is Mt. Everest getting taller, shorter, or staying the same height-wise?
I think taller as the tectonic plates are pushing it upwards but for confirmation you'll have to measure it yourself!!
Taller is what the experts say.
Who wrote The Wealth of Nations?
Adam Smith. I go to the Economic highschool.
BRAVO, BRAVO!! Pary Smilie

At least i'm not the only economist here...
Thorin, you forgot to post a question!

Here's one:
What is the longest tip-to-tip mountain range in the world?

(Nice thread, Fionwe)
I would have said the Andes.

What is the name of the nearest large Galaxy to our own?
Andromeda?

How many angels can dance on the head of a pin; assuming a 2mm head diameter?
Correct.
Quote:
What is the longest tip-to-tip mountain range in the world?

(Nice thread, Fionwe)


Actually, I think it's the Rocky Mountains. They extend from wherever they start in the north, all the way to the tip of South America, or wherever the mountains end in Argentina. They have a different name there, but it's the same mountain range.
Thanks!

Quote:
How many angels can dance on the head of a pin; assuming a 2mm head diameter?


An uncountable amount, limited only by the number of angels.

What does the formula E=mc squared stand for?
Einstein's Energy Equation: The maximum Energy in an object = its Mass x (the speed of light) x (the speed of light)

What is the second law of thermodynamics?
Quote:
Actually, I think it's the Rocky Mountains. They extend from wherever they start in the north, all the way to the tip of South America, or wherever the mountains end in Argentina. They have a different name there, but it's the same mountain range.
Thanks!


No its the Andes. They are 4500 miles long. The Rocky Mountain range is only about 3000.
Answer: The Second Law of Thermodynamics is commonly known as the Law of Increased Entropy. While quantity remains the same (First Law equals conservation of energy), the quality of matter/energy deteriorates gradually over time.

Is there such a thing as a free lunch? Explain in fewer than fifteen hundred words.
There is... but it's a very cheeky way of getting it...

Go to your classic MacDonalds drive-in, making sure that you are in a big line, in which there is at least one car behind you, so you can't reverse out... Go to the window, and say, "I've realised I've forgotten my money, so I'll just go straight through and come back in 10 mins". Of course the person at the window will oblige, but you don't go straight through, you go to the next window and wait, you then recieve whatever the person ordered before you! Free lunch! Orc Grinning Smilie

I, by in no way, intend, to give dark thoughts to any who read the above. If one does, I, the writer, hold no responsibility for anothers actions...

Would it be possible for love to make the world go round? Is that why the Earth moves so slow, because love is little?
No, Love is possible because the world goes around. If it didn't, half the population would freeze to death and the other half would be too buzy trying to invent a better pair of shades, than trying to fall in love.

Would water released from a spaceship into space boil because of the low pressure or freeze due to the low temperature?
Seeing as how temperature is the motion of particles, and due to the lack of particles in space, one could say that space has little to no temperature. However, lower pressure also lowers the temperature at which water boils. Eventually, at an altitude where the pressure is low enough (such as the vacuum space), the boiling point is so low that no such temperature can keep the water in liquid form, and the water boils rapidly. The vapor then desublimes into a solid, leaving tiny crystals of water. Well, at least I'm pretty sure about all that.

Who was the first person in space?
Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin 12 April 1961

Of course that really depends on the altitude where the planetary atmosphere is said to stop and space is considered to begin. Some of the Bell X series of manned rocket planes got rather high, but the North American X-15 reached the edge of space, but probably not before Gagarin's flight.

At what altitude above sea level is the current demarcation between our planet's atmosphere and space.
120 miles? I think that was the answer on the back of a Trivia Pursuit card I read once.
Quote:
The Earth's atmosphere is an extremely thin sheet of air extending from the surface of the Earth to the edge of space, about 60 miles above the surface of the Earth. If the Earth were the size of a basketball, a tightly held pillowcase would represent the thickness of the atmosphere. Gravity holds the atmosphere to the Earth's surface. Within the atmosphere, very complex chemical, thermodynamic, and fluid dynamics effects occur. The atmosphere is not uniform; fluid properties are constantly changing with time and place. We call this change the weather.
- from NASA's Earth Atmosphere Model.


Now for another extreme, how deep is the ocean?
The Marinas Trench is the deepest part, but not sure the exact depth, so I'll say 7 miles. That number seems about right, but I can't be sure.
That is the number that comes to mind; whether they have made a better measurement in recent years using radar or sonar, I don't know, but seven miles is close enough for me.
I do know that it's almost twice the depth as Mt. Everist's height, which is something close to eight-thousand meters.
Albert Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on what?
Einstein got the Nobel prize in Physics for his work on the photo-electric effect: electrons get ejected from a material when light falls on it.

What is the tallest mountain in the world from its base to its peak? (Hint: it isn't Everest)
Isn't it the mountain that Hawaii is on? I don't know the name Elf Confused Smilie , but if you measure it from the bottom of the ocean floor to its peak it is taller than Everest.

Oh, and K2 is actually taller than Everest for a couple weeks of the year, due to precipitation, but it still doesn't come close to that mountain that Hawaii is on.
Mauna Kea in Hawaii is tallest when measured from its base.
Correct, as I remember it is something like 35 thousand feet compared to 27 thousand for Everest and of course those numbers are rounded off. Google 'tallest mountains' if you want the more accurate measurements.
What and where is the smallest bone in the body

Thought I'd have a go of starting this again - starting with an easy one
One of the ears' drumsticks; I haven't any idea what they are called?
Yes.....it's in the ear - it's called the stirrup and goes with the anvil and hammer (sounds like something from Viking times...l..o..l.....).

Did you know that there's a fluid that goes around the semi-circular canel in the ear - when you're on a boat and get sea sick, it's beacuse the liquid is moving about. When you take sea sick tablets they make the liquid more solid...so now you know Big Smile Smilie
What is the difference between entropy and enthalpy?
Sorry looked this up and still don't understand - it's something to do with energy (different types?) Dunce Smilie


How about an explanation - which us dum dums can understand Elf Confused Smilie
Well I always thought enthalpy had to do with the heat energy that could be used to do work, while entropy was the energy that couldn't be regained and was lost forever, like that of friction. Everything is cooling down; rusting, rushing towards chaos.

How little do we actually know?
Compare a marble to the sun... If everything there was to know was the size of the sun, then what we know is even smaller than the marble... We only use say 2.7% of our brains? Or less... Incredible, maybe one day our minds will be allowed to expand...

What percentage of the brain do we use? Orc Grinning Smilie
I seem to remember reading somewhere it is about 2.7 percent, but I may be wrong due to having engaged typing fingers before putting brain in gear. Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie

Why can't we breath water?
Our lungs are not like gills and can't extract the oxygen out of the water. I think.

How much does the average horse weigh?
Horses don't weigh anything, because they don't have scales, they have horse-hair. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie

Though I'd guess somewhere about: 1500 pounds (107 Stone, 3/4 US short ton, 2/3 metric ton)

(I looked up the conversion tables, but not the riddle or the guess.) Elf With a Big Grin Smilie

Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego at this time in current history?