Login | Register
 
Message Board | Latest Posts | Your Recent Posts | Rules

Thread: tengwar charts

Is this discussion interesting? Share it on Twitter!

Bottom of Page    Message Board > General Discussion > tengwar charts   
I found this website and for all curious this site has tengwar charts and translations!
tengwar/english link

(AmariŽ just fixed the link)
Yes, I've seen those before and because they are Tolkien related I have decided not to move this thread to the Advertisements Section.
Doesn't seem very accurate to me.
Yey!! Pere is back!!
What isn't accurate then Pere?
I saw somewhere that when you write English with Tengwar, you write the sounds not the letters.
I doesn't feel quite comfortable with two e's being the same as a long i, as the vowels in Elvish are like in Norwegian.

I printed out a quote from Quenta Silmarillion written in Tengwar (by Chris Tolkien I think). There he writes great as 'greyt' and deed like dŪd (long elvish i) and his like hiz. (makes sense to me)

I also found 'he' and 'deed' written letter by letter, so he wasn't quite accurate either. And even written as eeven. Shouldn't that be Ūven or iven?

At least the site told me how vowels look "upside down" so I can write ie in AmariŽ with one carrier instead of two and pretend it looks right (it sure looks better)
Quote:
What isn't accurate then Pere?
I saw somewhere that when you write English with Tengwar, you write the sounds not the letters.
The vowel sounds are different from those specified by Tolkien, and I think some of the Tengwar have been misinterpreted. And yes, you do write phonetically, instead of following the letters exactly.
Quote:
Shouldn't that be Ūven or iven?
Õven would be preferable, I think.
Quote:
Yey!! Pere is back!!
Yay! Big Smile Smilie
Hello everybody!
In fact I'm german and I write in Tengwar with a pen pal for circa half a year now... I just wonder if the german Tengwar charts are different to the english ones?
They are the same, just like German and English have the same alphabet. Every language can be written with tengwar. I have just started to learn, but it sure is fun and pretty looking. Smile Smilie
Yes, it is...
My whole school stuff is ful of text from LotR in Tengwar.. Wink Smilie
Yes, it is the same alphabet, but as Tengwar is based on the spelling of words it's difficult to write english texts in tengwar for me...
You already wrote tat in English great is written like greyt... in German for example ei is written like ai... ok, bad example, I know. Wink Smilie

Do you write the Vocals as different kinds of accents over the foolowing konsonants or as "normal letters" which look similar to the others?
Because a friend of mine writes Tengwar too, but her charts are different...
Greetings,
idril
Quote:
but as Tengwar is based on the spelling of words it's difficult to write english texts in tengwar for me...
Tell me about it! I am Norwegian, so I know exactly how you feel. It is hard enough to spell the words, not to mention saying them and even worse when you have write what you are saying when you don't know if you are saying it right! And why can't those silly Englishmen/Americans just say the vowels as they are suppose to be? Luckily Quenya vowels are equal to our vowels. Wink Smilie

I think I understood the ei-ai thing. And there is the j, like in Jacob where we would say yakop and they would say.... well it is more than enough to drive a girl crazy. Ha Ha Ha Smilie
Quote:
And why can't those silly Englishmen/Americans just say the vowels as they are suppose to be?
Because after your ancesters settled in England and contributed Saxon to that of the Angles' language, the Normans conquered it and they brought their French language. So now there were three languages, each with their own set of phonetics and words that were amalgamated into the bastardized language called English.

This is why you can't tell by the spelling, the correct pronunciation of many of our words. Along with our many pronunciations for each vowel, our "ough" ending words are also rediculous; they can only be learned by common usage; though knowing the origin of the each word could help. (That's thow, not thuff.)

And now all we former colonists: Indians, Ozittes, Yanks, etc. have brought our own words and variations into the mess: that's why we can't be purists like you. Now if your people had just stayed home and fished instead of viking and looking for a newer digs ... Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie Elk Grinning Smilie
Here in Norway we manage to adjust the written language (we actually have two written languages, which is rather silly, but that's the way it) so it is closer to the spoken one. Foreign words that are adopted into the language are eventually given a norwegian spelling and you can choose what to write. Like juice can be written juice or jus. And we have three more vowels than English have. We lost 2/3 or our inhabitants and all who could write Norse in the great plague, we have been a colony twice,and the work done do make a brand new language is quite amazing and makes Tolkien look quite avarage really.

And had more people become vikings rather than fisherman and farmers, we might all be writing Norse about now. Ha Ha Ha Smilie
Well infact I don't think anyone would undesandme if I would write Tengwar in English because I think teher would be some way to write a word..
For example if I would like to write... eh... underground, I culd just write underground, Ibut it would be more correct to write andergraund or anderkraunt or something...
i think it's easiest, if you can write in Sndarin or Quenya, because thats similar everywhere. Wink Smilie

Hm, Grondmaster, yo are from USA, I think...
Are then the english ways of writing Tengwar different to the American?
Quote:
Are then the english ways of writing Tengwar different to the American?
Not to me; for Tengwar is Greek to me. Happy Elf Smilie Except I actually know the Greek alphabet but neither the vocabulary nor the grammar, while Tengwar, Sindarin, and Quenya are completely foreign to me. I'm a typical American in that I only use one language and that not very well. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
Ah yes... ok... *grin*
@Amarie: Well, would be somehow cool to read the Tengwar ind Norway for me... *g
Imagine, it looks first all the same, but if you start to read it's a complete different language.
Ok, I'm not shure if you understand me now, that's a bit... Wink Smilie
Quote:
They are the same, just like German and English have the same alphabet. Every language can be written with tengwar. I have just started to learn, but it sure is fun and pretty looking.


I'VE LEARNT!!!! It's real fun, let me tell you. And I've learnt moonrunes, too.

Quote:
Here in Norway we manage to adjust the written language (we actually have two written languages, which is rather silly, but that's the way it)


Japan has FOUR!!!!! Very Big Grin Smilie so don't feel bad.
Loni Posted Monday 18th October 2004 in What do you think would happen if Sauron got the ring?
Quote:
YAY, SEVEN HUNDRED AND FORTY ONE posts!!!!! I agree, Icey. Well done about the 500 posts thing. But can you write five hundred in tengwar? I feel proud because not only have I 740 posts, I can write it in Tengwar. Cool, eh? I feel proud.


Icefangs answered Monday 18th October 2004
Quote:
I can write it, I just can't read it O.o, I haven't had the time to sit and actually learn it; but, I have the fonts on my computer.


Loni Posted Friday 29th October 2004
Quote:
You STILL can't write it then. BEcause the keyboard mapping is different. Say you type 'p.' How do you know the keyboard mapping doesn't say it's 't' instead? You see, tegnwar is different to English. It's not an alphabet. It's a completely different writing system. The vowels are written different and all (if you're writing shorthand, that is, with tehta, like I do. It's fancier and more curlylooking). So it's different. I've got the fonts too, but haven't learnt the keyboard mapping for them. You see, in tengwar there are letters that are 'gh' and 'th' and 'dh' (I'm hoping you all know how to say dh and don't say carad - hras as separate syllables, sounding the d and the h separately) so then the mapping gets weird. I can write in the English mode (at least, I've memorised it) but I've yet to memorise the Quenya, Sindarin, and Swedish modes. (The SWedish is proving a challenge - the instructions are written in Swedish, you see).

Besides, I meant tengwar NUMERALS, which I have recently found. Both BAse 12 and Base 10 systems, for Elves or Mortals. Neat, eh?
Quote:
You STILL can't write it then. BEcause the keyboard mapping is different. Say you type 'p.' How do you know the keyboard mapping doesn't say it's 't' instead?

I've got tengwar fonts too, they work very well and it was SO logical once I sat down and found out how they worked. You can't push the letter t on the keyboard to get the tengwar letter for t, that is true, but you can easily write all the letters/sounds. The problem was to find the vowels. It is more fun to write them by hand anyway.

What do you mean by modes? Swedish and English mode is the same, and the link in the first post here says that is the same as the Sindarin mode. It is the same tengwars, the vowels are just placed a little differently. The problem is that the scandinavian languages have three more vowel than english (and therefore three more than the tengwar alphabet), and I am not satisfied with the suggestions I have found on how to write them. I made my own suggestions.