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i'm just starting a thread where all of us can talk about our thoughts on this new poll.

Most Impressive??
Fingolfin's Duel
The Ring's Destruction
Feanor's Speech
The Music of the Ainur
Killing The Witchking
Gandalf Resurructed
Turin Killing Glaurung


I myself picked the Music of the Ainur. When you talk about being impressive, there is really no competition about this on the poll ( my bad again!). The Music of the Ainur cannot be compared to the other deeds of Eldar and Men because no matter what the Children do, how can anything of theirs surpass the greatness of a whole world being called to life? Of course, many of their deeds had major impacts on this world, but compared to the music, which affected every grain of sand and every blade of grass, they are rather insignificant. So I do think this poll (composed by mself, unless I'm mistaken), has some flaws in it.

But on the other hand, I know it might not be fair to measure a thing's impressiveness by the effect of it. Some of us might view impressiveness to be a matter more to do with the circumstances that the choice was made under and the motivation for the choice rather than the result of the choice. For example, Frodo made a choice to carry the burden of the Ring in such dangerous circumstances, knowing that Middle-Earth's fate rested on his shoulders. Some might think this to be more impressive than the Music of the Ainur, as it required an extraordinary amount of strength and determination, as well as sacrifice.

Alas, I've already voted. Oh well, just have to wait another day, I guess... But tell me about all your votes.
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The Music of the Ainur cannot be compared to the other deeds of Eldar and Men because no matter what the Children do, how can anything of theirs surpass the greatness of a whole world being called to life?

The Music didn't call a world to life, it merely generated a vision of what should be, not what is. The Valar still had to achieve it after grunting it before Eru. That's why I don't think much of it.

I voted for Fingolfin's duel, merely because I couldn't vote for the other choices : Frodo did not destroy the Ring, for he failed in the end, and it was luck/fate that did it; Fanor's speech was merely the wallowing of a raving madman, la Goebbels; killing the Witchking was pathetic, just putting a sword under a crown after Merry had done all the work; Trin just sneaked under Glaurung to kill the beast : very heroic; and there's nothing special about Gandalf's resurrection : a naked guy on top of a snowy mountain. Sheesh.

Of course, Fingolfin's duel was quite ridiculous too; you might as well try to kill a blue whale with a needle, but at least the lad did it with bravura.

No, Beren & Lthien entering Angband should've been included in the poll.
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"Frodo did not destroy the Ring, for he failed in the end, and it was luck/fate that did it"


Okay, if Frodo's "dropping the ring into the fire of doom" was the thing that would make the destruction impressive I would agree with you, but it isn't. The impressive part was the struggle and impossibility of Frodo's task from the beginning, not just for him but for everyone even remotely involved.

Whole nations banded together to aid the little hobbits in completing their impossible task. Individuals and friends were willing to sacrifice their lives and put themselves into harms way to give a slim invisible chance to the two stalwart hobbits. The impressive part is that so many were willing to do so much, and that each and every sacrifice was necessary to open up that distant star of hope in the pitch black sky of Saurons future. It is darn impressive that the ring WAS destroyed. Darn impressive I tells ye.
*yawns* Sure it was.

I find it extremely pathetic that everyone did so much work and tried so much, only for Frito to falter in the end. That had to be the biggest anticlimax since someone told Morgoth that instead of the Silmarils, he mistakingly took three lightbulbs from Formenos.
Wow, Vir. You know how to kill a party dead.

There is more to the Ring's destruction than just Frodo/Gollum. There is more to killing the Witchking than Eowyn thrusting a sword. There is more to Gandalf's resurrection than his reappearance.... and so on.

When I read the poll choices I decided on the one that impressed me most, and still does, when I read it. It is Tolkien's descriptions rather than the deed which impresses. So I went for Music of the Ainur. Pretty impressive concert by all accounts. Don't dismiss it as just a vision. It was more than that. Their music helped formed what was to become Ea. Ok, so they had to work at it but it was formed according to what each had sung. Tolkien refers to 'their part in ordering and carrying out the Primeval design.' If music was able to produce all that then it must have been impressive. What would it have been like to be there and listen to it? To see the Ainur in all their splendour? How could one live after that knowing that nothing would ever surpass it? It's just Wow! and I'm sorry Vir doesn't feel the majesty and sorry that he reduces it to 'grunting'.

Don't get me wrong, I do not mind grunting. Otherwise I'd never seen Cannibal Corpse live a few years ago.

And seeing the Ainur in full splendour while they were singing/grunting, would not be possible. They're invisible spirits in their natural form.
Vir, if you imagine the song of the Ainur to be grunting, you maybe should try listening to a different genre of music altogether. Whatever has shaped your idea of "song" has got to go!

But I voted for the Ring's destruction. It is the most impressive as far as the pains which Tolkien had taken to building it up and showing its aftermath. And remember, the whole of LOTR was on a much more personal level than the Sil, so I think it makes a greater appeal.
I agree with Cloveress. And not just to suck up and earn a make out session. ;-p You can't compare aspects of the Music with the whole, else I'd go with Finglofins duel. I think. Beren and Luthien aren't half bad either. If you dodge that in the way I usually do by saying, "well, but that's no a single act" I go with the Music followed by the duel.
Fingolfin's duel is indeed very very impressive. But yet, after reading again the chapter on the Music, I've decided that the Music is still much more splendid. I agree with Vee about the descriptions. They are simply amazing.

Oh Vir... you do disappoint us all so much... I admit that Feanor's speech might've been quite unimpressive, and that they are the ravings of a madman (it is only regarded as the option for other raving lunatics, as we no doubt have on our happy little planet), but how could you just dismiss everything else (and such significant things too!)?

And don't make me sound so seductive, Mor, I'm actually quite sweet. Smile Smilie
Morambar...Cloveress...common, get a room! (id put a smiley here, but my keyboard has gone bonkers and i cant find half the signs)

I dont think THE Music should be in this poll. Its like asking `Whats more immpresive, God creating Earth or....the Alamo?`, you just cant compare it. That`s why i chose the second best thing - the duel of Morgoth and Fingolfin.
You can find the smilies in the "Website Help" thread; I've linked them somewhere but don't recall where. Try this:

Not that Webiste-Help is hard to find

As to your other comment, well, I started to say something about classing the Ainulindale in the same vein as Beren and Luthien: "not a single act" though I'm still not sure that's as true in the case of a single piece of Music. On the other hand if we consider the Music to be ongoing, as I've argued elsewhere, perhaps that might work. I am glad to see it tied with Fingolfins hopeless duel for first, and the Rings destruction getting about half as many votes as either. Guess we're getting more than movie fanpeople thanks to the Top 100. Just one more reason to vote, eh?

As to the other... well, sweet has a definite attraction all its own, but I thought I'd seen something about Cloveress being, like, 14, so I'll think I'll hold off on the room for now even if I am terminally single. Wink Smilie Besides, I think the Tolkienettes are still waiting for that sonnet (no, I didn't forget, but if an Aes Sedai's gonna Bond me, it's only fair to put her first, then I had to come up with another when someone bought me a Premium Account at wotmania for no apparent reason.) What rhymes with Valinor? Orange? No, wait, that's melange. I guess I could use Elsinor, but no romance in that setting has ever ended well.
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"I find it extremely pathetic that everyone did so much work and tried so much, only for Frito to falter in the end."


Rolling Eyes Smilie Okay I just have to do a little retort to a statement like that. FrODo being taken by the ring is a way of Tolkien showing just how impossible the hope of middle earth was. The fellowship set out on a "fools hope". No one could posses the ring for that long and willingly destroy it. It just goes to show what middle earth was up against, and how much more remarkable it was that the task was sucessful.

I remind you of the words of Gandalf at the council of Elrond:
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"It is not our part here to take thought only for a season, or for a few lives of men, or for a passing age of the world. We should seek a final end of this menace, even if we do not hope to make one"


They knew at the outset that this task was pretty much impossible, but they tried anyway. They put all of their energy into the smallest of hopes, and with a bit of luck (gollum's unintended help) were sucessful in acheiving the impossible.
Glad to see someone berating Vir for his impudence on such a grave topic.

And yes, I'm glad everyone is clear about my age. So don't get any warped ideas in your heads!
The impudence was less his than the Harvard Lampoons; direct your ire thence. Personally, I LIKE Frito, and Arrowroot son of Arrowshirt as well, if not as much as Tom Benzadrino. ;-p

By the way, are we going to get a announcement of the overall winner if Fingolfin and the Ainulindale continue to be neck and neck? I've been watching, but I haven't been able to separate them in the poll yet.

And now to find out if Cloveress has a big sister.... ;-p
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Glad to see someone berating Vir for his impudence on such a grave topic.

I was just stating my opinion, that's all. And a grave topic? You must be kidding, right?

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And yes, I'm glad everyone is clear about my age. So don't get any warped ideas in your heads!

Don't worry, no one in here would like to end up in jail.

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The impudence was less his than the Harvard Lampoons; direct your ire thence. Personally, I LIKE Frito, and Arrowroot son of Arrowshirt as well, if not as much as Tom Benzadrino. ;-p

Hur hur, my favourite is still Goddam the Clown.
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And a grave topic? You must be kidding, right?


You're not the only one allowed to make jokes around here. But I was not kidding.

And please, gentlemen, we're supposed to be family-friendly. That means when you have kids, you could actually show them everything on this site and not be embarrassed about it. Of course, I suppose you'd be proud that you had enough principles to at least seek only the suitably-aged ones. But I should cut this out too.

And as for the poll right now. I'd say the Music of the Ainur is leading by three percent. Fingolfin comes next, of course, followed by (can you believe it?) Gandalf's Resurruction. Then it's the Ring's Destruction. My, I never thought the Ring would lose to Gandalf.
Well i personally chose Gandalf's Resurrection (which i might add, is spelt wrong in the poll Teacher Smilie Elf With a Big Grin Smilie ) as it was really the only time when the Valar actually interveened with ME in the 3rd Age, it was important to allow Gandalf back as he would certainly steer the less wise ones in the right direction. From TTT, there wasnt much depth of it to get a clear view of how Gandalf came back or where he had actually went, i liked the mystery so i researched and once i found a good source of material on the subject it made so much more sense and i liked the idea that Eru Himself did something to change events, that is very impressive.

I would probably have chosen The Ring's Destruction second as it is the crucial point that everyone was or is reading to find out, the 5 books before the end was the build up but put beautifully, the rings destruction was written to such intensity, i felt like i was right there in the middle of it all, even looking out of Samwise's eyes, i got lost in it, but Gandalf's Resurrection is the most impressive in my oppinion.
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Well i personally chose Gandalf's Resurrection (which i might add, is spelt wrong in the poll ) as it was really the only time when the Valar actually interveened with ME in the 3rd Age, it was important to allow Gandalf back as he would certainly steer the less wise ones in the right direction.

The Valar did also intervene, however, by sending the Istari to Middle-earth around the year 1000 T.A.
oh yes they were brought to ME in the 3rd, for some reason i thought it was the second. But it was very impressive that Eru put His hand into it near the end, just when peoples hope began to fail because there was no-one to keep them on the right path, impressive that the Valar did something to help
Meh. I'm still not sure how easy it is to truly KILL a Maia, but then the Istari were supposed to have been bound to there forms when they came to ME. But sending the Maiar to act on their behalf isn't quite the same as the direct intervention in sending Gandalf BACK there. For one thing, didn't Gwaihir help with that trip? And he reports to and serves whom, again...?

And I'm willing to stand by my previous post; I just (evidently) can't quote the song. Oh, well.
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But sending the Maiar to act on their behalf isn't quite the same as the direct intervention in sending Gandalf BACK there. For one thing, didn't Gwaihir help with that trip? And he reports to and serves whom, again...?

The Valar didn't send him back, Eru did for Gandalf passed out of thought and time, hence beyond the Valar's dominion for they only dealt with earthly matters. Therefor there's no direct intervention (you should pay a visit to the 'Gandalf's rebirth - revisited' thread).

The Valar merely noticed 'whoops, Gandalf is dead' and contacted Eru to save the day. After the lad's resurrection, Manw then sent Gwaihir as it wouldn't have been very effective to have the reincarnated Gandalf to just freeze to death.
Sounds like direct intervention to me; the only reason the Valar didn't do it themselves is because they couldn't. So they asked ERU to intervene directly. And Gwaihirs involvement would still be direct intervention by Manwe
Not to me. I want to see Manw come personally and carry Gandalf to Lthlorien in his arms.

:-p
Wouldn't Eru granting Gandalf a new life BE a direct intervention? Who carries him back is a small matter, it's more the rebirth that's impressive.
I think I said that. ;-p Virumor just has impossibly high standards, which is why he'll hate TPoD as much as I do. re-;-p NO MAT! (A travesty!)
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Wouldn't Eru granting Gandalf a new life BE a direct intervention?

Read my post. I meant no direct intervention on behalf of the Valar.
I would have to agree that it was a direct intervention, the People of ME needed to have some sort of guide back and the dudes in the sky aka The Valar came in and gave them him again
So, bringing it all back home, as the only direct intervention by the Valar after the War of the Powers OR the only known and documented intervention by Eru after Atalante, is Gandalfs resurrection more impressive than Fingolfins duel (which has now edged past the Ainulindale?)
(new member)
Just to stir the pot a bit, I voted for the killing of the Witchking. In retrospect, I suppose other choices are more impressive , the Music of the Ainur certainly (if it had been possible to witness it), but the heroism of Eowyn and Merry was, and with every re-reading still is, extraordinarily heart-wrenching for me. Mentally impressive - I guess there are other choices, but in the drama of the moment, the slaying of Nazgul #1 made the greatest emotional impression on me.
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... but in the drama of the moment, the slaying of Nazgul #1 made the greatest emotional impression on me.
I was more choked up over the death of Theoden than that of the Nazgul Lord. I didn't shed a tear for the scary guy, but quite a few for Merry's loss of the kindly old gent.
Both were impressive, but everything in the Silmarillion seems more impressive to me than anything in the Trilogy. EVERYTHING was on a larger scale. Remember when Ar-Pharazon confronted Sauron? No desperate gamble there; Sauron took one glance and said, "OK, I'm beat." First Age solution to the War of the Ring: Feanor goes to Mordor and beats the #!@# out of Sauron, but leaves him alive to remember it and live in shame. Gandalf was killed in single combat with a Balrog; Feanor was killed by WAVES of Balrogs after leaving many of them dead on the ground. Well after, in fact; Maedhros and company came up at the last minute to beat off his kilers and bear him from the field. The gates of Angband were shut as the forces of Morgoth were routed. And I don't think the generally far more impressive Silmarillion stuff should be passed over simply because of the lamentable fact they're covered in far briefer detail. I was impressed by both aspects of the Witch-Kings end, but c'mon, how can you compare it to the Valars defeat(s) of Morgoth. In fact, now I think of it, The Scouring of Angband at the end of the First Age is probably most impressive, or, if we want to treat that as multiple acts, Earendils slaying of Ancalagon the Black that leveled Thangorodrim. Which brings me to the quintessential MERP comparison: "Ancalagon the Black makes Smaug the Golden look like a homesick Hobbit." ;-p
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Sauron took one glance and said, "OK, I'm beat."

Not really; he let himself be captured so that he could get close to Ar-Pharazon and influence his mind. It was all part of his grand design to destroy Nmenor. He already knew he couldn't beat them in arms after his armies got routed in the Eriador wars.

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Gandalf was killed in single combat with a Balrog; Feanor was killed by WAVES of Balrogs after leaving many of them dead on the ground.

Not really; it is just mentioned he was surrounded by Balrogs. Imo, he didn't kill any Balrog at all, but merely desperately tried to hold them off, which caused him so many wounds that it became fatal. If his sons hadn't showed up, Fanor would've been cut to pieces. After all, he was nowhere renowned as a great warrior.

He can merely be brave when taking on an unarmed person, like Fingolfin.

Anyway, it is logical that anything in the Sil looks more impressive : for the blood of Men was strongest then, and the Elves were stronger too as they were fresh from Valinor, so to speak.
Well, how many chances does Feanor have to be renowned as a great warrior? He was slain in the Battle under Stars. Slain because he single handedly drove the hosts of Morgoth before him in the front ranks of the Noldorin army. Like it or not, Feanor was the greatest of the Noldor in every way, both good and ill, which is why he didn't leave a corpse. I don't think he could have "fought on long, and undismayed, though he was wrapped in fire and wounded with many wounds" if he hadn't given as good as he got. I can just see Gothmog holding back and sending the "Balrog fodder" to where him down before closing for the killing blow. Indeed, if he wasn't dropping foes left and right I don't think he could have lasted long without being overcome by sheer numbers, but in the end the Captain of the Balgrogs had to personally finish him; even then he didn't die immediately. Put this way: he fought well enough, even wrapped in fire, that when his sons came to the rescue the Balrogs decided they'd rather not pursue them.
He was the greatest of the Noldor in craftsmanship, that i agree too. Just like Fingolfin was the greatest warrior, or Finarfin the wisest.

None of these traits got combined, hence i do not really see the possibility to put the label "greatest" on anyone.

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I can just see Gothmog holding back and sending the "Balrog fodder" to where him down before closing for the killing blow. Indeed, if he wasn't dropping foes left and right I don't think he could have lasted long without being overcome by sheer numbers, but in the end the Captain of the Balgrogs had to personally finish him; even then he didn't die immediately. Put this way: he fought well enough, even wrapped in fire, that when his sons came to the rescue the Balrogs decided they'd rather not pursue them

I think you are confusing Fanor with FIngon here; Fingon was finished by Gothmog himself in the Nirnaeth Arnoediad.
I'd have thought my paraphrase would have given me away, but Of the Return of the Noldor states:

"Long he fought on, and undismayed, though he was wrapped in fired and wounded with many wounds; but at the last he was smitten to the ground by Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs, whom Echthelion after slew in Gondolin."

I even closed my [] this time ;-p The impression I have from this is that it took Gothmog himself to do the deed, and he was only willing to put himself in harms way after his lesser brethren had been fed into the meat grinder that was Feanor. And the Silm also states Feanor was "the mightiest in skill of word or hand...." It further states "Fingolfin was the strongest, the most steadfast, and the most valiant." That makes him first as general, I think, and the noblest warrior, but I don't know it makes him more proficient in light of the quote immediately preceding it in the source. Regardless, I think that first quote is enough to say Feanor could take most, perhaps even all, Balrogs one on one; he was at least as capable as Ecthelion, yes? The question is can he fight a host of them long enough for his sons to come up and whisk him away (which we know he did) WITHOUT KILLING ANY. And I think the answer is they would have overwhelmed with sheer numbers if he wasn't dropping them like flies, which is why Gothmog took him out at the end of a long battle.
I think the Balrogs were just toying with him, keeping him busy until their master would come to finish him off as it would've been a great 'honour'.

If they'd have dropped like flies, then it would've been written. No one safe Tulkas would be able to send Balrogs dropping like flies... it was already quite an amount of work to defeat one Balrog, after all - and it usually meant the death of both (Gandalf, Ecthelion, Glorfindel,...).

Of course, Balrogs are not the towering giants like PJ apparently imagined them.
In all three cases the victor was at the point of exhaustion from previous fighting, clearly not the case with Feanor. The flip side is if it were that simple why toy with him at all when Gothmog could come in and quickly earn his honor? If a spent Ecthelion can take Gothmog, I have to think a relatively fresh Feanor would as well. Indeed, I've often reflected on the fact Feanor was KILLED when Morgoth would undoubtedly have preferred to have his host of Balrogs, led by Gothmog, take him captive to Angband, and I can only conclude one thing from the fact they didn't: they COULDN'T. Feanor was, even by the standards of the first Noldorin princes, quite simply, a bada-s.
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The flip side is if it were that simple why toy with him at all when Gothmog could come in and quickly earn his honor?

Because their leader had ordered them that "Fanor was his and his alone", for instance.

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If a spent Ecthelion can take Gothmog, I have to think a relatively fresh Feanor would as well.

Perhaps, but he would've died as well.

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Indeed, I've often reflected on the fact Feanor was KILLED when Morgoth would undoubtedly have preferred to have his host of Balrogs, led by Gothmog, take him captive to Angband, and I can only conclude one thing from the fact they didn't: they COULDN'T.

Maybe Gothmog was planning on taking Fanor captive by knocking him out, but alas, he knocked a bit too hard and clumzily dealt the fatal blow.

It is said that after that, there was not only Morgoth's cry heard in Lammoth for all eternity, but also Gothmog's "D'oh!".

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Feanor was, even by the standards of the first Noldorin princes, quite simply, a bada-s.

Yes, as he was bad, and an a-s.
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Because their leader had ordered them that "Fanor was his and his alone", for instance.


Fine, if it's that simple then Gothmog can just come and kill him at the start, which he didn't, I argue, because he couldn't. I'm not sure Ecthelion would've been killed had he been as fresh as Feanor was, and that was against the Lord of the Balrogs; against lesser ones Feanor should kill at least a couple. The only reason I think it worth debating is because of their huge numerical advantage.

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Perhaps, but he would've died as well.


This simply does not follow. Essentially, you're arguing the Lord of the Fountain was "mightier in skill of hand" than Feanor, whom the Silm states to be mightiest of all the Noldor in this capacity. Hence I don't think anything Ecthelion at the end of his defence in the Fall of Gondolin can surpass what Feanor can do at the start of the Battle-under-Stars. Lesser Balrogs must have bought Feanors life, and their Captains, with their own.

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Maybe Gothmog was planning on taking Fanor captive by knocking him out, but alas, he knocked a bit too hard and clumzily dealt the fatal blow.

It is said that after that, there was not only Morgoth's cry heard in Lammoth for all eternity, but also Gothmog's "D'oh!".


I don't think Gothmog that inept. I imagine the competition among Morgoths servants, with him there to praise the victor and torture the loser, put the Forsaken to shame. If it was possible to take the most skilled of the Noldor alive, it would have been done. Since it wasn't, even when he was alone amid the corpses of his few companions, I must conclude that even as with Turin when confronted by Mablung and his company, the choice was to kill him, let him go or watch him slaughter all but Gothmog one by one.

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Yes, as he was bad, and an a-s.


"Your pro-mop, anti-horse bias has been clear for some time, Marge." Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie
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Fine, if it's that simple then Gothmog can just come and kill him at the start, which he didn't, I argue, because he couldn't.

No, because the evil ones do not like honourable duels. Same goes for the WK and Ernur. They only care for winning, not honour. And "skill of hand" does not refer to weaponry imo, but to craftsmanship.

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I don't think Gothmog that inept. I imagine the competition among Morgoths servants, with him their to praise the victor and torture the loser, put the Forsaken to shame. If it was possible to take the most skilled of the Noldor alive, it would have been done. Since it wasn't, even when he was alone amid the corpses of his few companions, I must conclude that even as with Turin when confronted by Mablung and his company, the choice was to kill him, let him go or watch him slaughter all but Gothmog one by one.

I think they were more inclined to bring his head to Morgoth. As for competition, Gothmog was the Lord of Balrogs, they'd answer to him and follow his orders. They wouldn't cross him, or be creamed.

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This simply does not follow. Essentially, you're arguing the Lord of the Fountain was "mightier in skill of hand" than Feanor, whom the Silm states to be mightiest of all the Noldor in this capacity. Hence I don't think anything Ecthelion at the end of his defence in the Fall of Gondolin can surpass what Feanor can do at the start of the Battle-under-Stars. Lesser Balrogs must have bought Feanors life, and their Captains, with their own.

It is not even sure what Fanor exactly did with the Balrogs, so you can argue all you want. It is said he is surrounded, not that he even killed one Balrog. I conclude from that that the Balrogs were merely preventing Fanor's escape and waiting for their Lord to come, for he would decide what was to happen with the fly in their web.

Besides, Ecthelion was only able to defeat Gothmog by kamikaze, not by any skill at all. He was probably already mortally wounded, and Gothmog became cocky and loosened his defenses for a second, which opened the way for Ecthelion to dive into the fiend's arms.
Skill of hand covers, in part, weaponry as well. It's how Boar Rushing down the Mountain or whatever keeps Parting the Silk from taking your head. And while agree with you evil seldom possesses any honor, that only underscores my point: if Gothmog could beat Feanor one on one, he would have; that he didn't is indicative he couldn't.

And yes, I think any of his challengers would have been creamed, but that's what made him top dog, IMHO. By the same token though, I'm certain Morgoth gave orders Feanor, with all his skill, be taken alive -- IF possible. Again, that he wasn't is indicative that wasn't.

And a kamikaze attack still involves some skill to be successful, though it's worth noting Ecthelion had a huge target at which to aim; LT2 has him stabbing his helm in Gothmogs gut while standing fully erect, which gives us some idea of a Balrogs hiegth. But I see no way Feanor could have been kept pinned without loss of life on the Balrogs part. I'd even go so far as to say the impending arrival of his sons is what motivated Gothmog to dare the confrontation from which he'd refrained to that point.
There's nothing indicative in what you're arguing. It is all speculation. Maybe Gothmog did take on Fanor one on one, after all, as the Balrogs could've held Fanor in thier fiery circle until their Lord came to finish the intruder.

There is simply not enough information available to discuss this (off) topic. But you can believe what you want.
We have no reason to believe that when "there issued Balrogs to aid them" these were not led by Gothmog, and every reason to believe they were. Yet Gothmog held himself aloof from combat with this single foe until the very end, and only then just before the sons of Feanor came to his aid. These seven were themselves enough to break the leaguer about them, once in and again out. Every aspect of the situations logic leads me inevitably to believe the only Noldor to mighty to even leave a corpse was enough on his own to slay at least a few of his assailants, if not win free. However we may feel about him personally. ;-p

But I can't deny we're off topic, and since I can't even remember how we got here, I suppose I should just let it slide and agree to disagree about something no canon can resolve either way.
Well, you posted the followin controversial statement on 11 March when you were trying to explain why the Silmarillion is so much better than LOTR : "Feanor was killed by WAVES of Balrogs after leaving many of them dead on the ground."

Hence, you started it! Lucky for you, i'm a lenient CM. :-P
I think the most impressive deed was to create the Silmarils. That wasn't even included in the poll.
I can't even make my Pseudo-Silmarils long lasting, let alone take on a Balrog, even a lesser one. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
Cool, something else to argue about. How can creating the Silmarils be more impressive than creating the Two Trees without which they'd have never existed? And the Two Trees were ALIVE. You Feanor groupies.... Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie