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Thread: Poll Your Idea of True Warrior

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In the Poll: Who is your idea of a true warrior?
Who did you choose and why?



This poll was suggested by Cloveress. Happy Elf Smilie She meant it to be limited to only characters from LotR, for we all know that many characters of the First and Second Ages were unarguably far superior warriors. Teacher Smilie
All of the prebuscent girls on the site who only read the books after seeing the movies are going to vote for Legolas. I can hardly blame them, though; Elf Smilie Super Wow Smilie Orlando Bloom Jumping Flame Smilie Making Out Smilie is so dreamy...
Animated Wink Smilie Orc Grinning Smilie Na-na-na-na-na Smilie

I know, my maturity is infinite!
I voted for Arwen, because she single-handedly ended the Battle of Helm's Deep, even if PJ cut it out.
I voted for Boromir because I wanted to ensure his place in Valhalla so he can carouse with the rest of the dead warriors of old, now that the heavy burden of responability has been removed from him.
Stereotypically, I would say Aragon, only for the typically lone warrior look, a sword of great power, a deep, dark past with a slightly brighter future... Typical Battle Crys etc...

But myself, I would say Eowyn, she fought for a reason, a strong will to do it despite her own troubles... In fear she would rise to the challenge, and still fight on even if she had a broken arm at the time... Though I'm sure that even if she didn't defeat the Witch-King at the fields, the Army of the Dead would have covered him over in a sea of green Orc Smiling Smilie

But that's a thought, if Eowyn didn't defeat the Witch-King, could the Dead Men of Dunharrow defeat him instead? Does the prophecy specifically point to living men or men entirely? A deadly battle Happy Elf Smilie
By the time of the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, the Dead had already been excused by Isildur's heir after they routed the Pirates of Umbar at Pelargir.

Only in Peter Jackson's mind did they fight anywhere near Minas Tirith, having had their geas lifted the day before, about 150 miles downriver. Teacher Smilie

However, just for the sake of discussion, I don't think the Witch-king would be frightened by the Multitude of Dead whose main weapon was fear, for that was his greatest weapon too; and his mace and sword probably would have just whiffed through them.
Very true, which is why, after I realised that they would've been miles away from the Witch-King, I'm going to rephrase it... Even though you may have already answered it Orc Smiling Smilie

Battle: Witch-King vs King of the Dead Men of Dunharrow... Who would win?

No good scaring already scary ghosts... They wouldn't be very good ghosts if they had and shown fear... Super Scared Smilie
The true warrior in the list is Boromir. He fights for the glory of fighting and victory. Recall his rant at Amon Hen when he tried to take the ring from Frodo. Aragorn is a practically invincible warrior. But he fights to protect Gondor and its people and those of The Shire, etc.
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The true warrior in the list is Boromir. He fights for the glory of fighting and victory. Recall his rant at Amon Hen when he tried to take the ring from Frodo.

The Boromir at Amon Hen was under the spell of the ring. The real Boromir fought for Gondor.
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Does the prophecy specifically point to living men or men entirely?


I think the beauty of the prophecy is in its intended vagueness. Tolkien was forced to write Glorfindel's words of course, but they were spoken (in some language other than English obviously), and the prophecy plays upon the meanings of English Man and man.

The fulfillment rests on wordplay, which is why the Rohirrim do include both Éowyn and Merry with respect to the prophecy. Can a person who is dead be said to be not a man (spoken word) in some 'tricky' sense?

This prediction is supposed to be somewhat deceiving. Even someone 'from his mother’s womb untimely ripped’ is still technically 'of woman born' (Macbeth), just not in the usual way, but I hope no one on any Shakespeare boards today is complaining that the prophecy was 'really' not fulfilled! In any case I think the Dead slaying the Witch-king (assuming this was possible in the first place, noting what the story has to say about the Dead and their swords) would not be very satisfying.

Anyway, what was the topic again Wink Smilie
I chose ARAGORN!
He just had it all, physically strong and nimble, and really compassionate and honourable at the same time. Too good to be true, but that's why i voted for him!!

How pleasant it is to see one of my polls up at the side again! Although Grondy is right... the FA warriors were FAR SUPERIOR
There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever in the books to back Aragorn as a great warrior, the only thing mentioned is that "Boromir & Aragorn slew many" during the cafuffle in the Chamber of Mazarbûl (and then, it did not describe in which manner said slayings occurred). But beyond that, nothing. As far as warriors go, JRRT gives the attention to Boromir, who slew many Uruk-hai in his defense of Peregrin & Meriadoc, and Gimli, who slew many in his defense of Legolas at Helm's Deep.

Above all, Aragorn was a Ranger of Eriador, which is almost the exact opposite of a "warrior": always careful & calculating of one's chances in combat, opting subterfuge & stealth over setting one's hair on fire and running at the enemy and very keen on strategy rather than blind violence - not to mention always opting to end a stand-off with the art of persuasion rather than brawling. These characteristics are also why Aragorn was to be a King. His throne was won not by arms, but by careful plans.

Indeed, in JRRT's works warriors never fare well - there's a very long list of warriors, ranging from Fingolfin to Boromir who mayhap fought nobly, but ultimately always went down painfully and contributed nothing to the greater outcome of things - but whose actions instead proved detrimental and needed to be corrected.

Expanding further on this, the "changing of Éowyn's heart" near the end of ROTK is completely understandable: during her time languishing in the Houses of Healing the Lady spent many an hour contemplating her past ruinous course on the Path of the Warrior, and when comparing her path with Aragorn's she finally came to understood that arms could never accomplish what he had accomplished -- hence her turning away from the Path of the Warrior and turning over to the Path of Guile: marrying the future Steward of Gondor, who was clearly enamored of her and henceforth an easy tool to be utilized in future intrigues that would (as she hoped) lead to the throne of Gondor at Aragorn's side.
Aeowyn, swords down.
Feanor,
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"For Fëanor was made the mightiest in all parts of body and mind: in valour, in endurance, in beauty, in understanding, in skill, in strength and subtlety alike: of all the Children of Ilúvatar, and a bright flame was in him." (by J.R.R.Tolkien, Silmarilion)
This poll was only for LOTR characters. Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie
But because our Poll Archiver is broken Ammornil could no longer find that out. After a newer poll has been posted, the previous one is lost instead of archived.
In fact I knew, but forgot. Sorry. If requested by CMs I will delete my previous post.
I would vote for Aragorn –

Virumor states
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There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever in the books to back Aragorn as a great warrior, the only thing mentioned is that "Boromir & Aragorn slew many" during the cafuffle in the Chamber of Mazarbûl (and then, it did not describe in which manner said slayings occurred). But beyond that, nothing. As far as warriors go, JRRT gives the attention to Boromir, who slew many Uruk-hai in his defense of Peregrin & Meriadoc, and Gimli, who slew many in his defense of Legolas at Helm's Deep.

Above all, Aragorn was a Ranger of Eriador, which is almost the exact opposite of a "warrior": always careful & calculating of one's chances in combat, opting subterfuge & stealth over setting one's hair on fire and running at the enemy and very keen on strategy rather than blind violence - not to mention always opting to end a stand-off with the art of persuasion rather than brawling. These characteristics are also why Aragorn was to be a King. His throne was won not by arms, but by careful plans.
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There is an overwhelming body of evidence (in the books) to suggest otherwise. If we are talking about simple body counts – not the way of the warrior – then Aragorn still racked up quite a score on the Pelennor and at the Black Gate, especially as in the true tradition of warriors and leaders he led from the front. Furthermore, according to the appendices he spent a number of years in the armies of Rohan and Gondor under the guise of Thorongil, since he didn’t want his true identity known, to prevent any dissent or jealousy. This still happened with Denethor who suspected him at the time. Indeed, whilst serving under Ecthelion he made remarkable achievements, and was revered as a great leader and warrior who slew the leaders of the opposition – always a mark of distinction. Tolkien’s idea of a Warrior( and my own) is that warriors do not simply slaughter mindlessly like some thug – otherwise we might as well vote for any number of Orcs. (not to JRRT’s taste I’m sure)
In conclusion, Aragorn embodies all the noble attributes of a warrior, and still racks up a good score, for those interested in those things
You haven't read very many of Virumor posts, have you Gwindor?
In his younger years, Aragorn was hired by Gondor and Rohan, there he was armed and dressed as a warrior; likewise on the Field of Pelennor he was armed and dressed as a warrior. In Eriador, the Misty Mountains, and in Mirkwood he was a ranger and dressed for the part: light armor and his bow was his main weapon with his sword as a secondary weapon. There he was dressed for stealth, a warrior's clanky armor is out of place in the wilds. We don't wear our suits when farming and we don't wear our bib-overalls at the office. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
Does ANYONE ever wear bib overalls past the age of two?

I think Aragorn was a great warrior, he was both a stealth wise ranger and an all out courageous warrior, just depending on what he was accomplishing, with whom and also whatever was clean from the laundry that day. . Smile Smilie

I LOVE the comment about not having read many of Vir's comments. Honestly, is there anyone quite like him? he's the BEST.
Farmers still wear bib overalls when they are repairing machinery; they are comfortable have lots of pockets and accept grease and dirt better than chinos, and blue jeans and levies are usually too tight. Of course this is just my opinion and may no longer be true for the younger generations.

I can't see Eomer in a pair of cast iron bib overalls going out to feed his horses, but I can see Sam in a bib overalls tending the garden at Bag End.
Eowyn, for she had fought knowing who she was facing. None other would have withstood the onslaught of the witchking, except Gandalf and Aragorn. As for the former he is far greater than the Witch king of Angmar and the latter, he is partly a descendant of the spirits that were with Eru.
Eowyn disobeyed her king and I have to say that kind of gives me pause, disobedience is not to be taken lightly. But in the grand scheme of things it was what was necessary. Aragorn, however, did what needed to be done even though he didn't want to. He distrusted himself and would rather have lived life in obscurity but went to the forefront of the battle and became a leader (and king) anyway because it was what Middle Earth needed.

About overalls, my uncle who was a farmer often wore them. When I was younger I worked in a Yamaha parts warehouse one summer as a temp. Another temp was a young man who wore overalls and because it was very hot he had no shirt on with them. Then he decided to take down the straps too. This became quite a distraction and work slowed down significantly as the female workers waited for the rest of the outfit to hit the floor so the manager made him hitch up the straps again. Just an amusing memory.
I am with the manager! Smile Smilie
Honestly,not since childhood have I seen anyone even on my uncles ranches in Alberta canada or in the United States that wear overalls. They all, to a man, wear levi jeans and a t shirt or a long sleeved shirt, usually in a plaid, don't know why exactly.