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Valedhelgwath began this thread with the following post.

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Considering he was the greatest craftsman of the Children of Iluvater, the creator of the Silmarils, and the instigator behind the Noldor returning to Middle Earth, I'm surprised there isn't a thread already about Feanor.

Well, there's so much to say about him, I'm going to leave that to everyone else. All I'm going to say is something I originally went searching through pages of Character threads in order to say in the first place.

I was reading Morgoth's Ring when I came across something I never realised before. Feanor was actually the first elf to be born. His parents and all of the elves older than him were created by Eru, but he was actually the first of the next generation.

Although his birth is the first to be mentioned in the Silmarillion, I assumed many others had been born before that, but just not mentioned. According to notes Tolkien made, however, Feanor was the first. Tolkien originally intended Feanor being born during the Great Journey to the West, somewhere near Mirkwood, but he quickly altered this idea, having him born instead in Tirion, but still the first.


Allyssa replied

Feanor the First-born? That must have been quite a shock to the elves!

But seriously, it does fit with the mood of the the ME mythology, that their greatest and most beautiful should be corrupted or 'marred' by evil.

Was Feanor himself evil? That is, can he be said to be responsible for his actions?

I also remember reading somewhere that Feanor held mortals in absolute contempt. Has anyone else read this passage? (it was in one of the HOME books)

No he wasn't. He was the first elf to be born in Valinor.
He wasn't the first Elf to be born in Valinor either. He wasn't the first Elf.

i.e Serinde as Miriel's mother name is of Quenya form for Perinde, which is Quenya. Quenya wasn't as advanced in M-E as Beleriand so Miriel got her mother name in Valinor hence she was born there. Just a example. I believe 'Laws and Customs' states that she was a generation younger then Finwe, I also believe I read Nerdanel was older then Feanor.

Also, Feanor was born in the V.Y 1179, some 46 or so years since the Noldor and Vanyar reached Aman, since one V.Y is equal to 9.58 Y.OS then surely in there would've been a few Elf babies born in a few hundered years?
That had to be put here:
That doesn't have to because look at Galadriel and Celeborn they lived a couple of thousend of years together and only got one or two childs


[Edited on 23/5/2003 by Tauron]
I fail to see your point....

Here you are describing two Elves, they are and can be exception,I am talking about thousands. For example you could claim Nerdanel, Mahtan, Maedhros, Amrod and Amras had red-brown hair as told in the Shibboleth of Feanor (HoME 12) yet they were exceptions...

In the peace of Aman, the Elves were more likely to have children, as Elves opt to have children and marry in times of peace. Read Laws and Customs (HoME 10) for more information on Eldarin marriages etc.
Moderator Smilie Grondmaster moved the following posts from under Beleg and Mablung:
Tauron posted on 23/5/2003 at 19:38
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That doesn't have to because look at Galadriel and Celeborn they lived a couple of thousend of years together and only got one or two childs (dunno for sure UT says that Amroth may or may not have been the son of Galadriel and Celeborn)
Findekano posted on 23/5/2003 at 20:03
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That doesn't have to because look at Galadriel and Celeborn they lived a couple of thousend of years together and only got one or two childs (dunno for sure UT says that Amroth may or may not have been the son of Galadriel and Celeborn)
Galadriel and Celeborn only had one child, BTW, Celebrian, Amroth as a son of the two was rejected and he was son of Amdir Malgalad, the Sindarin king of Lothlorien in the S.A
They had only lived in Aman for 46 years but elves will not have children unless they can belive they can bring it up. They probably wouldn't have trusted the Valar yet.
Some of the first elves to be born would be Orcs!
Fëanor sure was a great craftsman......the best pupil of Aulë.....but darn it I wonder how he made the substance silmarillia.....
Big Smile Smilie
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They had only lived in Aman for 46 years but elves will not have children unless they can belive they can bring it up. They probably wouldn't have trusted the Valar yet.
Some of the first elves to be born would be Orcs!


Ross-The Annals of Aman tells us how one Valian year was equal to 9.58 years of the sun (Here we must discount the idea of a Elven yen being 144 Years of the Sun given in the Appendix to LoTR and seemignly re-surfacing in Myths Transformed ) so therfore it was 440 or so years of the sun since the Vanyar and Noldor came to Aman and Feanor's birth.

They did trust the Vaalr thats why they went to and remained in Valinor, why would they stay with people they didn't trust? There were many Elven people before feanor, Miriel, his mom, and when talking to Manwe Finwe mentions that Ingwe and Olwe had brought forth many kids into the world. Some of the first Elves first born weren't Orcs either.
No but they were corrupted into Orcs which breed profusely. Therefore they were the first elves born. Orcs are still techinicaly elves until the Uruk's are bread. As for saying that the elves did trust the Valar, most of the elves will have go to aman through love of the leaders. Not because of a instant trust of the Valar. That is why the majority of the elves are the Avari. It is also the reason the Grey elves came into being. They did not leave through the love of their leader Elwe!
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No but they were corrupted into Orcs which breed profusely. Therefore they were the first elves born.


Note the idea that Orks were derived of Elvish stock was a Eressian loremaster theory, one that Tolkien seemingly later rejected, at least to the point that they wee only partly derived from Elvish ‘stock’ but were in the main of Maiacal;

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In any case is it likely or possible that even the least of the Maiar would become Orcs? Yes: both outside Arda and in it, before the fall of Utumno. Melkor had corrupted many spirits some great, as Sauron, or less so, as Balrogs. The least could have been primitive (and much more powerful and perilous) Orcs; but by practising when embodied procreation they would (cf. Melian) [become] more and more earthbound, unable to return to spirit-state (even demon-form), until released by death (killing), and they would dwindle in force. When released they would, of course, like Sauron, be 'damned': i.e. reduced to impotence, infinitely recessive: still hating but unable more and more to make it effective physically (or would not a very dwindled dead Orc-state be a poltergeist?)


Bestial


In summary: I think it must be assumed that 'talking' is no necessarily the sign of the possession of a 'rational soul' or fea. The Orcs were beasts of humanized shape (to mock Men and Elves) deliberately perverted I converted into a more close resemblance to Men. Their 'talking' was really reeling off 'records' set in them by Melkor. Even their rebellious critical words - he knew about them. Melkor taught them speech and as they bred they inherited this; and they had just as much independence as have, say, dogs or horses of their human masters. This talking was largely echoic (cf. parrots). In The Lord of the Rings Sauron is said to have devised a language for them.

And Mannish origin, though here Men’s awakening was put much further back to the march of the Eldar maybe ,but this would not fit in with the chronology of Adanel’s tale since Melkor was here held captive by Namo in Mandos, but nonetheless Men had awaken much further back even if no accurate date can be given.

Latter on in Myths Transformed Tolkien comments that Orc’s were reduced to a ‘puppet-like’ condition, therefore they could not be corruptions of Elves/Dwarves but of Men. If we are to work from texts that don’t conflict the Published Silmarillion, or form the Quenta itself, then your statement ‘Orcs are still technically elves until the Uruk's are bread.’ is void for several reasons.


1. Orcs couldn’t possibly still be Elves. They were a different race entirely. They were vile ,corrupted and a parrot-like race, this does not constitute Elvish abilities. There were Orc-like beings haunting Cuivienen prior to the ’transformation’ of Elves to Orcs, They were evidently of Bestial and Maiacal form, therefore Orcs being technically Elves cannot be true since they were of various origins. I also notice that psychically they were much like animals, esp. in regards to the ‘long arms’ that are continually ascribed to Orcs in LoTR;

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Orcs are still technically elves until the Uruk's are bread.


I’m confused by this statement. ‘Uruk’ is simply another term for ‘Orcs’ a borrowing of Sauron from the Quenya/Sindarin term, or early Elven for the spirits of malice that haunted them. The Orcs’ delighted in this name as it was a exclamation of fear, but later on it was used for the ‘best soldiers’ of Sauron’s regime (LoTR; appendix, HoME 11, Quendi and Eldar). For example, when under attack from Orcs in Moria Gandalf says ‘Some of them are very large and evil: black Uruk’s from Mordor’.

If you are referring to the URUK-HAI mixtures of Men+Dunlanders,we (I believe Sauron also bred Uruk-hai, hence the statement in the conversation between the two Orcs witnessed by Sam and Frodo that a ’pack of rebel Uruk-hai has taken over Cirith Ungol) ,we can see that there were still ‘few’ of them in comparison to other ‘normal ‘Orcs’.

No they went because of the promise of Aman and the Two Trees as well as reverence for their leaders, when the Elves actually SAW Oromë they saw him as the goodly figure that he was and they had a reverence for Elebreth before they got to Aman which would have been enhanced when they arrived there:

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There the Vanyar ands Noldo embarked on that isle…and were welcomed to it’s bliss.
Published Silmarillion; Of Eldamar


I don’t see any quote which ever says upon arrival in Aman they were mistrustful of the Valar or that Feanor was the first born in Aman. There dozens of references to Elves being born in and out of Aman before Feanor, given in previous posts.

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That is why the majority of the elves are the Avari


Actually the proportions upon leaving Aman were 3:2 in favour of the Eldar. (HoME 11, Quendi and Eldar) Also they did want to leave but couldn’t because they arrived too hence to term they gave to themselves the ‘Eglath’ (Forsaken)

Do you actually read the words that you are typing sink in or just carry on typing blindly in some vain attempt to sway people to missinformed arguements.
I did mean Uruk-hai, but in an attempt to abrieviate you seem to have either misunderstood me or have chose to try and misquote me!
I didn't mis-quote you I gave people both explanations of the word, note 'If you meant Uruk Hai'

I feel your attitude as being offensive to me. I was pleased that I had supposedly come across a civilized Tolkien forum when I saw the 'family friendly' and know, days after I have joined, I feel myself questioning this. sorry, but I nevr recollect making insultry remarks to you, I view as agressive posts. his
Moderator Smilie Okay, shake hands guys. This is a family friendly site.

I find Findekano's posts very well researched and informative, though they are frequently based on material I have not yet read, and often turn my previous views on their head. If you disagree with the content of these posts, Ross, it would be better if you argued your case constructively rather than critisizing what appears to be the occasional typo.
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Moderator Smilie Okay, shake hands guys. This is a family friendly site.
And if you must fight, remember to keep it impersonal.

Now go to your neutral corners, choose your textual weapons, come out when you hear the rooster crow, and may the best Muppet win.



PS: Don't hold your breath, the rooster is a rubber chicken with a terminal case of laryngitis. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
Again, I aplogise to Ross if I insulted him in any way. Or maybe I come across as arrogant? I'm sorry if I do.

Now I don't think he's proved me wrong thus far I'm wondering if he has anything else up his sleeve?
I did feel slighted by you in two ocasions, but I'm willing to both accept your apology and offer one in return.

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and may the best Muppet win.
Come on eveeryone knows I'm the Mad Muppet Catcher Genera,l of coarse I will win! Tongue Smilie

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No they went because of the promise of Aman and the Two Trees as well as reverence for their leaders, when the Elves actually SAW Oromë they saw him as the goodly figure that he was and they had a reverence for Elebreth before they got to Aman which would have been enhanced when they arrived there:
The Elves hid or fled in fear from Orome, due to the fact that Morgorth had his minions hunt the Elves soon after he discovered. Nahar was a wild and fierce beast that would scare the living excrement out of the bravest creature. Orome was the hunter embodied, his form was of that, designed for tracking down and slaying of beast's.
Thank you, both of you Smile Smilie
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The Elves hid or fled in fear from Orome, due to the fact that Morgorth had his minions hunt the Elves soon after he discovered. Nahar was a wild and fierce beast that would scare the living excrement out of the bravest creature. Orome was the hunter embodied, his form was of that, designed for tracking down and slaying of beast's.
I think the point here is that Melkor (not yet named Morgoth) had disguised himself in the visage of Orome and hunted down the Elves before the Valar discovered they had awakened, so that when the real Orome actually discovered them, they naturally fled and hid from him. Melkor in his evil started the relationship between the Elves and the Valar with fear and mistrust. Or did I read that section of the Silmarillion wrong too?
Yes, this is just what I was looking for: a chance to talk about Feanor! Tolkien did a great job tracing this complex character at the beginning of the book, where everything else is either good or evil! Feanor doesn't fit in this "classification", cause his nature is good, but his deeds are far from being so!
Findekano (or anyone else),

Could you please let me know where you picked up the references you have to when Feanor and other elves were born pre-1st age - I assume it is in the HOME series somewhere?
I have mentioned on other threads my reluctance to dive into HOME, not wishing to spend endless hours reading stuff that contradicts the Silmarillion; but this is the sort of detail I would be willing to buy the odd additional book to get.
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I think the point here is that Melkor (not yet named Morgoth) had disguised himself in the visage of Orome and hunted down the Elves before the Valar discovered they had awakened, so that when the real Orome actually discovered them, they naturally fled and hid from him. Melkor in his evil started the relationship between the Elves and the Valar with fear and mistrust. Or did I read that section of the Silmarillion wrong too?



No, Melkor didn't disguise as Orome : the Elves only saw/described Melkor as a 'dark horseman' or something and i don't think Orome was a dark guy. Besides, i think Melkor would never mimic someone of his brethren because of his big ego : why would he change himself in one of his lower brethren? (the way Melkor would see it)

It is not sure either whether this 'dark' lad was Melkor himself or just someone Melkor sent to capture some Elf and bring it to Utumno. Melkor doesn't seem the guy to kill his time with chasing Elf lads and lasses to me. But it is possibile.

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Could you please let me know where you picked up the references you have to when Feanor and other elves were born pre-1st age - I assume it is in the HOME series somewhere?
I have mentioned on other threads my reluctance to dive into HOME, not wishing to spend endless hours reading stuff that contradicts the Silmarillion; but this is the sort of detail I would be willing to buy the odd additional book to get.

No sorry i cannot help you, JonnieA. I don't trust HoMe myself. UT is where it all ends for me.
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Could you please let me know where you picked up the references you have to when Feanor and other elves were born pre-1st age - I assume it is in the HOME series somewhere?
The references to Feanor being born on the Great Journey West come from Morgoth's Ring. They were from one of the first drafts of the Quenta Silmarillion, and in successive re-writes this birth occurs later and later along the time scale.

What I am finding is that you have to be really careful how you interpret information you find in HOME. You have to look at what stage the section was written, and then decide if it contradicts the Silmarillion, or whether it was superceeded itself by later material.

Unfortunately some of the last stuff Tolkien wrote seems to contradict a lot of the stuff which was published in the Silmarillion (the creation of the sun and moon for example). It seems as though he was trying to fit his world back into our own known cosmos. I'd like to think that had he lived longer, he'd have torn up these later ideas.
From what I have seen of HOME, I agree with your last comment completely!
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No, Melkor didn't disguise as Orome : the Elves only saw/described Melkor as a 'dark horseman' or something and i don't think Orome was a dark guy. Besides, i think Melkor would never mimic someone of his brethren because of his big ego : why would he change himself in one of his lower brethren? (the way Melkor would see it)

It is not sure either whether this 'dark' lad was Melkor himself or just someone Melkor sent to capture some Elf and bring it to Utumno. Melkor doesn't seem the guy to kill his time with chasing Elf lads and lasses to me. But it is possibile.
Okay, I partially had it wrong. Happy Elf Smilie Here is what Tolkien actually wrote on the fourth and fifth pages of Chapter 3 (Of the Coming of the Elves) in The Silmarillion:
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Yet many of the Quendi were filled with dread at his (Oromë's) coming, and this was the doing of Melkor. For by after-knowledge the wise declare that Melkor, ever watchful, was first aware of the awakening of the Quendi, and sent shadows and evil spirits to spy upon them and waylay them.

So it came to pass, some years ere the coming of Oromë, that if any of the Elves strayed far abroad, alone or few together, they would often vanish, and never return; and the Quendi said that the Hunter had caught them, and they were afraid.

And indeed the most ancient songs of the Elves, of which echoes are remembered still in the West, tell of the shadow-shapes that walked in the hills above Cuiviénen, or would pass suddenly over the stars; and of the dark Rider upon his wild horse that pursued those that wandered to take them and devour them.

Now Melkor greatly hated and feared the riding of Oromë, and either he sent indeed his dark servants as riders, or he set lying whispers abroad, for the purpose that the Quendi should shun Oromë, if ever they should meet.
The next paragraph goes on to say that when Oromë actually came riding on his horse Nahar, that some of the Quendi hid, some fled and were lost, but those that were brave were drawn to the light of his face seeing that he wasn't a shape out of darkness.

Note: For ease in reading on the Website, I did break the longer quote above, from one gigantic paragraph into four smaller ones.
_________________________________________________________
And the very next paragraph is the one that says:
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Yet this is held true by the wise of Eressëa, that all those of the Quendi who came into the hands of Melkor, ere Utumno was broken, were put there in prison, and by slow arts of cruelty were corrupted and enslaved; and thus did Melkor breed the hideous race of the Orcs in envy and mockery of the Elves...


[Edited on 3/12/2003 by Grondmaster]
But what were the orcs made from? I mean....Melkor could not give life....where the **** did the uruks come from?!?
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Yet this is held true by the wise of Eressëa, that all those of the Quendi who came into the hands of Melkor, ere Utumno was broken, were put there in prison, and by slow arts of cruelty were corrupted and enslaved; and thus did Melkor breed the hideous race of the Orcs in envy and mockery of the Elves...

This is the opinion of the Elves. JRRT himself wrote somewhere in his letters that the Orcs weren't created out of Elves and that they have nothing in common. He acknowledged that what was written in the Sil, was indeed just the opinion of the Wise of the Elves.
The first Orcs were Eldar captured by Morgoth and tortured until they were twisted in to Orcs.
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The first Orcs were Eldar captured by Morgoth and tortured until they were twisted in to Orcs.

See my previous post, and see below.

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But what were the orcs made from? I mean....Melkor could not give life....where the **** did the uruks come from?!?

Where did dragons come from? wargs? orcs?

How did Melkor make dragon bodies, if we agree that the dragon spirits are Maiar (like with the great Eagles) ? Did he capture an eagle and tortured the beast until it became a dragon?

I think Melkor made Orc, dragon, warg, troll bodies the way Aule made Dwarven bodies. And one way or another he was able to put some soul into it.
For dragons i think he put a Maiar soul in it, for instance. What soul he used for an Orc, i have no idea.

The easiest explanation would be the Elvish explanation that Melkor hunted and captured some Elf and turned Elf into Orc by means of torture and making them watch the extended version of TTT, but as JRRT wrote somewhere in his Letters that this wasn't true, i'm in doubt.

I remember i read that letter somewhere some time ago, but i am not sure for 100%


[Edited on 4/12/2003 by virumor]
In the Myths Transformed section of Morgoth's Ring, in which some of JRR's last writings were placed, there is a section about the origin of Orcs. Those of you wishing a definitive answer will perhaps be disappointed, but it seems even JRR could not decide on the origin of his Orcs.

I am not going to copy out the entire section, because it is several pages long, but the various ideas that JRR toyed with are:-

1) Melkor created the Orcs as Aule had done with Dwarves. Eru had not blessed the Orcs, however, so they would not have a fea. Basically this would mean the Orcs were virtually thoughtless unless Melkor was directly controlling them, and nothing more than mere beasts when not doing so. There are certain problems with this theory, in that Orcs do seem to have their own will/thoughts when not under direct control, but JRR counters this with his idea that Melkor disseminated his own powers at this time among his followers (ie. the concept of Morgoth's Ring, in which Morgoth lessened his own power by placing a little of himself in everything else).

This theory does fit in well when considering how Orcish armies just wander mindlessly when Melkor or Sauron is defeated.

2) Melkor created bodies, as he had done with dragons etc, and they were filled with some of the weaker Maiar spirits. Once they practiced procreation, they became more "earthbound" as Melian had done, and began losing many of their powers as they diluted their strength into future generations.

However, in a letter written in 1954 JRR wrote
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since in my myth at any rate I do not conceive of the making of souls or spirits, things of an equal order if not an equal strength to the Valar, as a possible delegation, I have represented at least the Orcs as pre-existing real beings on whom the Dark Lord has exerted the fullness of his power in remodelling and corrupting them.... There might be other"makings" all the same which were more like puppets filled (only at a distance) with their maker's mind and will, or ant-like operating under direction of a queen-centre.


3) The letter above suggests that Tolkien had orcs corrupted from some already living being. They predated Men, so it likely these beings were Elves. In LotR he says,
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The Shadow that bred them can only mock, it cannot make: not real new things of its own. I don't think it gave life to the Orcs, it only ruined them and twisted them.....

In the legends of Elder Days it is suggested that the Diabolus subjugated and corrupted some of the earliest Elves...



Finally it says...
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Since Melkor could not create an independant species, but had immense powers of corruption and distortion of that came into his power, it is probable that these Orks had a mixed origin. Most of them plainly (and biologically) were corruptions of Elves (and probably later Men). But always among them (as special servants and spies of Melkor, and as leaders) there must have been numerous corrupted minor spirits who assumed similar bodily shapes.
OK, this thread is now officially alive, again... Bear with me and my essay... Of course, any opinions will be more than welcome, here or under 'The House of Finwe...' thread from Silmarillion. Here goes nothing!

Fëanor – essay on

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He was tall, and fair of face, and masterful, his eyes piercingly bright and his hair raven-dark; in the pursuit of his purposes eager and steadfast. Few ever changed his courses by counsel, none by force. He became of all the Noldor, then or after, the most subtle in mind and the most skilled in hand.

Silmarillion, Chapter 6

That was Fëanor. To some - the greatest Elf ever to walk in Arda; to others - the darkest Calaquendi. But, when you come to think of it, who was Fëanor in truth? The answer is right before our eyes:

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In that time was born in Eldamar, in the House of the King in Tirion upon Tuna, the eldest of the sons of Finwë, and the most beloved. CuruFinwë was his name, but by his mother he was called Fëanor, Spirit of Fire; and thus he is remembered in all the tales of the Noldor.

Silmarillion, Chapter 6

It’s a case of split personality, perhaps: on one hand, we have ‘Finwë the Skillful’, his birth-name; on the other hand, his mother names him Feanaro, ‘Spirit of Fire’. And, indeed, he was skillful and hot-tempered; his life is a permanent battle between these two traits. But, in the end, the inner fire prevails…
Fëanor's spirit was a consuming flame: it burnt everything around and then, when there was nothing left, it consumed him.

To lose one's mother is a terrible thing to happen; to lose her and to think you were the cause of her death, that's beyond tragedy! Those were Fëanor's feelings when growing up. He had no mother to temper his outbursts, no mother to love him beyond guilt or hope, no mother to counsel him when in doubt. Maternal love cannot be replaced by anything, not even by his father's overwhelming affection. Oh, speaking about his father …

When Míriel died, Finwë saw his entire world crumble. He held only to one hope: his son. He put all of his care in raising him and Fëanor was, from the very beginning, the one he loved above anyone and anything else. He did make a choice, though, that would influence the Noldor's entire history afterwards. Marrying Indis, he neglected what Fëanor might think of this; the future deeds of his son, the enstrangement between him and his half-brothers, have shown that. Yet, no one can deny the great and decissive role their houses played in the common fight against Evil.

Finwë's death was the turning point in Fëanor's life; from then on, he was driven by his inner fire only. Indeed, can anyone find a greater connection of a father with his son?

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Then Fëanor ran from the Ring of Doom, and fled into the night; for his father was dearer to him than the Light of Valinor or the peerless works of his hands; and who among sons, of Elves or of Men, have held their fathers of greater worth?

Silmarillion, Chapter 9

Then there’s this ‘fea theory’ I have. The Eldar’s hroa (flesh, material body) is consumed by their fea (spirit) as time passes by; they come to see life as a burden, some day. Yet, in the beginning, their fea is brighter and stronger than their hroa. That could explain why the first Elves seem more powerful and imposing than the latter. Also, it may explain Fëanor’s unusual strenght of spirit! And his selfishness, of course! After all, feas are what you may call ... unsociable and lonely!

No doubt about it: the most precious and the most wanted things Fëanor ever made were the Silmarils. Their creation is surrounded by a mysterious halo, just like the substance they were made of: silima. Also, for the following course of events, I think it’s important to know why did he even commited himself to such a task; and that’s explained right from the beginning:

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For Fëanor, being come to his full might, was filled with a new thought, or it may be that some shadow of foreknowledge came to him of the doom that drew near; and he pondered how the light of the Trees, the glory of the Blessed Realm, might be preserved imperishable. Then he began a long and secret labour, and he summoned all his lore, and his power, and his subtle skill; and at the end of all he made the Silmarils.

Silmarillion, Chapter 7

But how much did he put forth into these jewels? Was it more than mere smithcraft? Was it creation? This is where one of Tolkien’s main themes appears once more: the creator/maker. Eru Iluvatar is everywhere, in everything, at every moment; He uses the Flame Imperishable to kindle His Creation; His Children have him in their spirits. Melkor, in the attempt to rule Arda, diffuses a part of his mighty fea in the world’s hroa; thus, not until the world is broken and remade, can Evil be cured that once has been good. Sauron, on the other hand and on a different scale, concentrates his power, making the One Ring. The Dwarves resemble Aule, their Maker, in mood; the mood which Eol passes to the sword he makes, one Gurthang.
The point would be that, for a creation to have a life of its own, the maker has to put forth into it more than his lore, knowledge or skill; he has to put a part of his spirit as well, binding himself to it. As Fëanor says:

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‘For the less even as for the greater there is some deed that he may accomplish but once only; and in that deed his heart shall rest. It may be that I can unlock my jewels, but never again shall I make their like; and if I must break them, I shall break my heart, and I shall be slain; first of all the Eldar in Aman.’

Silmarillion, Chapter 9

Yet this brings me to the single moment in his story when I cannot explain his deeds: the Kinslaying at Alqualonde. Why did he not understand the Teleri, when Olwe told him:

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‘... these [the ships] are to us as are the gems of the Noldor: the work of our hearts, whose like we shall not make again.’

Silmarillion, Chapter 9

... I cannot see! Blinded he was, and fey; his fault unforgivable!

And so I come to faults, which one could call sins. There's lust and forgetfulness:

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For Fëanor began to love the Silmarils with a greedy love, and grudge the sight of them to all save his father and his seven sons; he seldom remembered now that the light within them was not his own.

Silmarillion, Chapter 7

… rebellion:

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[…] For Fëanor now began openly to speak words of rebellion against the Valar, crying aloud that he would depart from Valinor back to the world without, and would deliver the Noldor from thraldom, if they would follow him.

Silmarillion, Chapter 7

… pride:

Quote:
[…] Fëanor… being eminent in self-will and arrogance…

Silmarillion, Chapter 7

… treason:

Quote:
[…] Fëanor caused fire to be set to the white ships of the Teleri. So int hat place which was called Losgar at the outlet of the Firth of Drengist ended the fairest vessels that ever sailed the sea, in a great burning, bright and terrible. And Fingolfin and his people saw the light afar off, red beneath the clouds; and they knew that they were betrayed.

Silmarillion, Chapter 9

Of course, when speaking of mistakes, sins and evil deeds, one should take a moment and think of Melkor. Though his lies pierced through to Fëanor's heart, he never subdue his will; Fëanor lived under the Shadow, bearing the Enemy's hate, yet he was never conquered:

Quote:
[…] none of the Eldalie ever hated Melkor more than Fëanor son of Finwë, who first named him Morgoth; and snared though he was in the webs of Melkor's malice against the Valar he held no converse with him and took no counsel from him.

Silmarillion, Chapter 6

Quote:
[…] and Fëanor looked upon Melkor with eyes that burned through his fair semblenceand pierced the cloaks of his mind, perceiving there his fierce lust for the Silmarils. Then hate overcame Fëanor's fear, and he cursed Melkor and bade him be gone, saying: 'Get thee gone from my gate, thou jail-crow of Mandos!' And he shut the doors of his house in the face of the mightiest of all the dwellers in Eä.

Silmarillion, Chapter 7

Quote:
Then Fëanor rose, and lifting up his hand before Manwe he cursed Melkor, naming him Morgoth, the Black Foe of the World; and by that name only was he known to all the Eldar ever after.

Silmarillion, Chapter 9

The choice that he had, to break or not the Silmarils, could only be resolved, as he said it, by his slaying in the process; I think he knew that best of all. Yet this should not be the end of the discussion… Even under these circumstances, shouldn't he have surrendered the jewels? He could've sacrified himself, but, after all, we're talking about the most selfish and self-centered Elf ever, perhaps… So, I guess that's out of the question!

Twice banished (once from his home in Tirion, the second time from Aman itself), cursed by Mandos and pursued by the wrath of the Valar, not recognized as King of the Noldor, Dispossessed (along with his sons), slayer and betrayer of kin, swearing a terrible oath, Fëanor was far from what he was in the beginning, from what he was supposed to be; the Valar were grieved, and Manwe wept:

Quote:
And they mourned not more for the death of the Trees than for the marring of Fëanor: of the works of Melkor one of the most evil. For Fëanor was made the mightiest in all parts of body and mind, in valour, in endurance, in beauty, in understanding, in skill, in strenght and in subtlety alike, of all the Children of Iluvatar, and a bright flame was in him. The works of wonder for the glory of Arda that he might otherwise have wrought only Manwe might in some measure conceive.

Silmarillion, Chapter 11

Yet they did grant him his renown:

Quote:
But at that last word of Fëanor: that at the least the Noldor should do deeds to live in song for ever, he [Manwe] raised his head, as one that hears a voice far off, and he said: 'So shall it be! Dear-bought those songs shall be, and yet they shall be well-bought. For the price could be no other. Thus even as Eru spoke to us shall beauty not before conceived be brought into Eä, and evil yet be good to have been.'
But Mandos said: 'And yet remain evil. To me shall Fëanor come soon.'

Silmarillion, Chapter 11

And Mandos always knows best… The Spirit of Fire soon burned his way out of the material world, as one who was just passing by, not willing to stay for long in Arda Marred.

Quote:
[…] and there issued from Angband Balrogs. There upon the confines of Dor Daedeloth, the land of Morgoth, Fëanor was surrounded, with few friends about him. long he fought on, and undismayed, though he was wrapped in fire and wounded with many wounds; but at the last he was smitten to the ground by Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs, whom Echtelion after slew in Gondolin.

[…] Then he died; but he had neither burial nor tomb, for so fiery was his spirit that as it sped his body fell to ash, and was borne away like smoke; and his likeness has never again appeared in Arda, neither has his spirit left the Halls of Mandos. Thus ended the mightiest of the Noldor, of whose deeds came both their greatest renown and their most grievous woe.

Silmarillion, Chapter 13

Yet some say that after Dagor Dagorath, the Battle of Battles, when Morgoth will suffer his last and uttermost defeat, and the Silmarils will be recovered from air, fire and water, Fëanor himself will bring them to Yavanna; then they will be broken and the Light within shall shine anew. One can only hope in the power of redemption…

Namarie!
I loved that, Bugy. Thanks.

Made me cry for Feanor, for everyone. And I understand him more now.

Fearnor - not the nicest, but most definitely the Brightest.

An excellent and well-researched post, Bugy!
Thx, Vee & JonnieA! You're both too kind! *Bugy blushes* It was the least I could do for the great Elf... After all, I'm using his name, I gotta have some back on that! Of course, with the exception of the last paragraph (which I think is from one of the volumes of HoMe), the entire thing is taken from the Silmarillion, so it's not by far complete... It was the best I could do for the moment!
Thx again and I'm glad you enjoyed it!

Namarie!
Buggy seams to have a lot to say. I wish I had time to read it....
You're right, Crystle, I do seem to have a tendency to speak too much... especially when it's about Feanor! But I cannot help it... he's too great!
Super Wow Smilie It really is worth taking the time to read! Magnificent work Bugyman! I've got to go read the Silmarillion again real soon.
Cranky bub that was friggin excellent! I enjoyed every piece of that! You should get the Pulisher Price for that great interpretation of Fëanor´s life and all......I am still in awe chumWink Smilie
Congrats! Big Smile Smilie

//Your chum
Aulë Mahal
I liked the piece also Master Bugy, well versed and analysed... but on a lighter note:

"isnt Feanor rather like a little spoilt child who brings along his new football (or toys) to play with his friends and then decides out of spite, to take his ball(toys) away with him for his own selfish amusement - Bright or Brat?"

Very Big Grin Smilie
No.

Dont take that too seriously friend, twas meant as a lil innocuous pokey-fun thing.

"light-hearted means just that" I'm sure Feanor is big enough to take the odd jibe or two, were he around.

heh
I think you misread the tone of my post. Twas nowt but sarcasm.
I'd private message you Vee, but i have a measly 5 mithril left... Ach!!!

Anywho, me understands, just that on some sites, any kind of unflattering remarks made in regard to subject matter Tolkien can and have been taken largely out context and made out to be some kind of blasphemous attack, when in fact its not! Hmmm, well i must caution against my irreverence in all things for fear of being snagged by the Spanish Inquisiton. Paranoid Smilie

P.S. the security settings at my terminal prevent me from entering the chat-room... *smacks head against monitor* Big brother is watching me, i must work or else its the LASH!!! Moderator Smilie
I am not known for subtlety. Neither am I an angel who fears to tread....


Can you get into the chatroom now?
ps: I can do a great impression of The Spanish Inquisition.

"bring out the fluffy cushions!!!"
Shocked Smilie
Who told you about my cushions?

Nicely plumped.......

Sorry....... Very Big Grin Smilie
I dont want this to degenerate into a Python fest... seen it happen b4
Wink Smilie


Vee left you a response on the literature question you asked me? on the Ivy somesuch

Degenerate?

I was going to ask if anyone could spot the bored people.

I've seen your response to Any Questions and I have responded.

OK, back to Feanor and Bugy's wonderful essay.

Next!
And Fëanor is still the subject here so I´ll just point out the fact that he shouldn´t have underestimated Morgoth....nor anyone else should´ve.....even in the presence of the Valar Morgoth is the more powerful(before he incarnates himself into the hroa of Arda except for Aman....) Morgoth and Aulë were of "similar" character....they both want to create....Aulë wants to create as a child wants to gain more knowledge and etc....he is not the evil kind.....Morgoth wants to create to dominate and be more of a god and he prolly wants to surpass Eru but he does not understand that that is impossible because he is to proud......he is the evil kind....
But since they both want to create and Fëanor was closer to Aulë then the other Valar as all Noldor were....well....yeah....I´m the ValaWink Smilie
Anyway I don´t remember what I was gonna write.....this always happens to me....when I write longer posts I tend to break my train of thought.....anyway....Great essay mate! Excellent it wasWink Smilie
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