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I didn't like the Boromir character in the book. He was always saying "I told you so." and that's just plain anoying, and when he wasn't anoying, he disapeared all together (maybe it should have been Bore a Mir).

I loved the movie Boromir. Felt pitty for him, felt concern for him, unlike I thought I ever would... It must be the acting and directing because I cry more and more each time i see Boromirs Death sceen.
i agree with swampfaye obout the book boromir. but even if i hadn't read the book it was very apperent from the beginning that he wanted the ring for himself. but in the later books it decribes him as on caring for his country and willing to do anything he sees nessicary to save it. and if you noticed in the movie argon was always watching him.

o and the way he does is awsome. he died with some serious skills. but i wish they would have showed more orcs and things with him when he died and also that they would have put the orcs weapons in the boat with them.
Welcome Melathiel. I don't believe Boromir was evil by nature, The Ring just drew on his concern for the people of Gondor and bent that, trying to get him to take The Ring from Frodo.
Sean Bean's performance as Boromir gave me a stronger feeling of sympathy for him. In the book, I also found him irritating at times, a bit like a person who talks far too much. I kept wishing he would shut up and stop making such a twit of himself.

In spite of Tolkien's descriptions, I never imagined him as remotely attractive, more like the Nasmith interpretations.

Boromir's death in the film is the most moving scene of all. I found it even more poignant than Gandalf's death for some reason, (maybe because I know Gandalf is not dead). The only thing lacking was a little more blood. I'm not blood-thirsty! I just know that for a man to bleed to death, he has to loose a LOT of blood. I guess PJ was thinking of the kiddies.

I think Boromir is not overly bright, which is why he cant understand the need to destroy the ring. He is very likeable, but a bit dumb (sorry). PJ represented his character well in that respect, and we see that not only does he understand it in the end, but in the movie, Aragorn comes into acceptance of his heritage at the same time. A possible improvement on the plot, I think.

Like Elija Wood's Frodo, Sean Bean's Boromir gave me a greater sympathy and understanding for the character.

Hope I didn't rabbit on and bore you Mel.
I will make comments only on Boromir from the book. I like him a lot and I can easily identify with him. He seems to be so strong, a real bully sometimes... but deeply inside he is very uneasy and frustrated. He is feeling he is giving much and receiving too little. Mark his constant comments about "gratitude", about people which show little gratitude to Gondor for fighting in their defense. During the celaring of the path on Caradhras pass he also makes remarks of this sort.. He desires gratitude. He needs it. Why? Because in his heart he feels unloved (I guess). He is told to be the favourite of Denethor, but I strongly suspect that Denethor was anyway much too cold and demanding, not giving him praise and warmth enough. And both Boromir and Faramir are half-orphans, their mother died young...
Well I liked the movie Boromir...but having just read the book again, I must say that I prefer the book Boromir more.

I didn't have a problem with his incessant whining (since Luke whined more & I still liked him Smile Smilie) and desire for gratitude. Remember, even Denethor & the honourable rangers Aragorn & Halbarad also commented on the lack of gratitude (from the rest of ME, Barliman & the Shire folks, etc).

I felt sorry for Boromir - he wanted to be king but unfortunately didn't have any royal blood. Pity the guy. He would have been a great King of Rohan though, or, had he lived, a king of the southern regions.
Yes- I pity him too!
What I like in him is also his sense of responsability. Yes, he is not very royal...
and yet he IS a leader. He does not wait te be commanded to do this or that:
he is constantly taking initiative and/or giving advice!
He is acting most of the time as a kind Big Brother, keen to protect his companions.
And then he has to die...

In the book the description of his death is extremely moving, too.

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["Farewell, Aragorn! Go to Minas Tirith and save my people! I have failed."
"No!" said Aragorn, taking his hand and kissing his brow "You have conquered, Few
have gained such a victory. Be at peace! Minas Tirith shall nit fall!" e o/quote]

I think that Aragorn did here the very best thing that could still be done. I was
particularly moved by the fact that he dared to kiss him. It must have brought a great
solace to Boromir. Now he was no more an Elder Brother who failed - but a Younger
Brother in arms of a yet Elder Brother assuring him that everything will end well...
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Now he was no more an Elder Brother who failed - but a Younger Brother in arms of a yet Elder Brother assuring him that everything will end well...

Hmm, never thought of it that way, Eryan. Interesting thought that. Cool Smilie
Thanks for that nice smile, Ungoliant!
I cannot arrive to insert smilies into my texts alas!!!!
Actually, Aragorn was much older than Boromir - when he was fighting in Gondor
as Thorongil he was the rival of Denethor![Edited on 10/2/2002 by Eryan]
"...in Gondor as Thorongil ...". I know Aragorn served in Gondor and Rohan in his younger years (2957-80 T.A.); but didn't know that he went by another name. Whence comes that tale? Smile Smilie
[Edited on 11/2/2002 by Grondmaster]
The name Thorongil ("The Eagle of the Star") comes form the Appendix A
to the ROTK, section "Stewards".
[Edited on 11/2/2002 by Grondmaster]
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The name Thorongil ("The Eagle of the Star") comes form the Appendix A
to the ROTK, section "Stewards".
Oh, I see it now, and of course that would have been Aragorn, even though the text doesn't state it outright, it dovetails nicely into place with the natures of both Denethor and Aragorn. Thanks.

See kids, you too can gain insights into the characters, if you read the Appendicies to the LOTR. Cool Smilie
I liked the book-Boromir, not the movie-one. And he took so long to die! Smile Smilie No, honestly, didn't like him in the movie. I didn't feel anything for him, that's all.
I'd have to buy RotK then. And I don't see any point in doing that cos I have the one-volume version. Smile Smilie
I've got a one-volume version as well, but with full appendices. In a way it's easier for me since now I don't have to take 3 books to the bathroom for one of my long soaks in the bath. Big Smile Smilie
You don't happen to be the captain of a Golgafrincham space ark do you Golly?
Was that the alien race that blew up Earth in HHGTTG?
No, he was the incompetant loonie who crashed his spaceship into earth two million years earlier. You were thinking of the Prostectnic Volgon Jeltz of the Galactic Hyperspace Planning Council, who was Captain of the Volgon Constructor Fleet. Both were in HHGTTG by the late Douglas Adams. Cool Smilie
lol. That's right...I knew that it was someone weird like that....although I can understand the splashing around in the bathtub for 3 hours bit. Maybe a distant relation then...Smile Smilie

Yeah, the appendices gave me another perspective on Boromir too. About how he was protective of Faramir...I liked a lot better after that too.
He was very protective of everybody, even to the degree of being an interfering busybody. But I like that!
And I also like the mention (and the end of FOTR book) that he used to bite his nails. It is such a human touch! [Edited on 26/2/2002 by Eryan][Edited on 26/2/2002 by Eryan]
He is human, remember? :P

Is anyone else as lost as me about what the three oldies here are up to? Smile Smilie
Read the Hitchhikers Guide to the galaxy sometime Tommy, it'll really help you out.
I'll need much more things to help me out than the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, believe me! Mad Smilie
But I'm sure it'll help, so I'm off looking for it! Oink Smilie
And don't forget your towel, it is the second most important thing you can take on an adventure. The first of course is your head, which you should also bring back with you from an adventure in order for said adventure to be considered a success. Big Smile Smilie
What about a toothbrush? Very Big Grin Smilie
Thank you very much for the welcome.
I'm sure I'll enjoy my time here.
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He is caring for others, but he is also fairly egocentric and one of the main factors motivating him is a very strong desire for personal glory. He desires to be a great leader, loved and admired by his followers.

That's true, but who wouldn't want to be loved and admired? That's just what all people are like. And also Boromir was never actually loved by anyone, except for his father, but his father is not the kind of person who would demonstrate his feelings and he was too demanding. The reason I like Boromir more than Aragorn is because Aragorn is just too perfect, while Boromir displays all different kinds of feelings that every human has, including anger and pride, but he overcomes them in the end, when he tells Aragorn that he has failed his people.
When I first saw the movie, Boromir wasn`t on my list over wich characters I liked best...but eventually I`ve gotten to like him more and more, and Boromir in the movie is much..nicer? than Bor in the book...

I think Sean Bean did a good job...saw him in a film yesterday where he played against Harrison Ford, and he did quite well..weird that I haven`t seen him in any other movies..And he`s handsome too...sorry, just had to put that in!
I watched FOTR before reading the book (and I really regret that) so I didn't know anything about Boromir yet. I cried at his death in the movie, although I thought it was a bit unrealistic how he still stayed alive after 2 or 3 arrows passing through him. I didn't actually like him though.
Then I read the book, and in the book there's almost nothing written about the way he battles with the orcs and how he dies so I liked this part of the movie more. But in the book I got to see his character much better and I understood that he was doing everything for his people. And trying to get the ring from Frodo was the Ring's effect on him, Boromir would never have done that himself (remember how he cries later and how worried he gets about Frodo?)
Well my main point is that Boromir is a noble and brave man and certainly not evil, and that he's also one of my favorite characters, although my all time favorite is Sam.
Welcome to our forum Elentari31. Happy Elf Smilie
I like Boromir, but I cannot agree that he is doing all only for his people. He is caring for others, but he is also fairly egocentric and one of the main factors motivating him is a very strong desire for personal glory. He desires to be a great leader, loved and admired by his followers. Look how he is repeatedly complaining that people around him are not grateful enough!

[Edited on 17/10/2002 by Eryan]
Hi elentari31. Hope you enjoy your time here.
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although my all time favorite is Sam.
You have something in common with our own Plastic Squirrel then. Smile Smilie
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You have something in common with our own Plastic Squirrel then. Smile Smilie

And you think that's funny do you Val? Hi elentari31, I promise not to hold your fondness for Sam against you. Wink Smilie
About Boromir... true, true, everybody want to be loved. But I have a feeling that if I did sometning really ridiculous and felt really ashamed and humiliated about it, Aragorn, Frodo and Faramir would do their best not to hurt my feelings - but Boromir would simply laugh!
Plastic Squirrel:
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I promise not to hold your fondness for Sam against you.

Thanks, but why do you hate Sam so much? Sad Smilie
And about Boromir
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I have a feeling that if I did sometning really ridiculous and felt really ashamed and humiliated about it, Aragorn, Frodo and Faramir would do their best not to hurt my feelings - but Boromir would simply laugh!

That's my point - Aragorn and Frodo are just too perfect. I don't know if Boromir would laugh or not... But the main thing I like about him is that in the end he accepts that he's not perfect.
I have a feeling that if he wasn't killed I wouldn't like him that much.
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but why do you hate Sam so much? Sad Smilie
Elentari31: Have you read the comments by Plastic Squirrel and others in our Samwise Gamgee thread, also under Characters? Smile Smilie
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Have you read the comments by Plastic Squirrel and others in our Samwise Gamgee thread, also under Characters?

Thanks, I just did. Big Smile Smilie
Waving Hello Smilie Hi Elentari31!

One big lesson learned: never trust a Plastic Squirrel. I did so before and was prooved wrong every time. Big Laugh Smilie
Ok, Tom, I'll keep that in mind. Wink Smilie
Heh, I'm perfectly trustworthy, just can't stand Sam.
What struck me most in the books and movies is how much Boromir loved the hobbits, in particular Merry and Pippin. In the book, when Frodo is backing away from him,Tolkien's description made me feel like Boromir was hurt that Frodo would do that. He was by no means an evil man. He was just a little more suseptable (suceptable? suseptible? oh well!) to It's power. And Sean Bean portrays him wonderfully. When he starts talking about the White Tower, you can see that he loves it, and hates the fact that it might not be there. And his relationship with Merry and Pippin shows that he wsa not hard-hearted. He loved them bery much, and I notice that more and more as I reread the books and rewatch the movie. Big Smile Smilie
Okay, *shugs* I'll admit to likeing Boromir. He wasn't really a bad guy, he was just really easyly corrupted by the one ring.
Though I mostly like him for his amusment value.
Human pincushion...need I say more?
Very Evil Smilie
In the movie he like saved almost everyone atleast once- Merry, and Pippen from the stupid Uruk-Hai with the axe, he grabbed Frodo when he tried to run to Gandalf when he was about to fall, Gimli when he tried to run back into Moria, and Aragorn was staring at the place where Gandalf fell nearly getting hit by orc arrows and Boromir yelled Aragorn really loud and sort of woke him up.
Boromir is really my favorite character in both th movies in the books (except he's only alive in one book),and I hate Faramir though.
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...and I hate Faramir though.

How can you hate Faramir?

Anyway, Boromir was essential to the plot of the story. Yes, I know some of you don't like him, but the facts remain: his attack upon Frodo at Parth Galen was essential. It broke the Fellowship. If that hadn't happened, they would have lost. For example, Frodo and Sam wouldn't have taken the route through Cirith Ungol. While dangerous, it was the only way that Sauron could not see. Merry and Pippin's capture brings them to Fangorn Forest, where they escape in time yto rouse the Ents to overwhelm Saruman at Isengard and Helm's Deep.
Following the captives, Strider meets Eomer to begin the transformal of Rohan, and meets Gandalf, who frees Theoden from Wormtongue. So on and so forth. All because Boromir lost contorl to the temptations of the Ring.
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... All because Boromir lost contorl to the temptations of the Ring.
If this was Eru's plan, so much for free will, we are back to fate. Poor old Boromir. He won in the end, but lost his life in doing so, but then I guess we can say the same for Frodo.
I think that boromer is brave but the ring drew him to take it from frodo, bring it to gondor so that sauron would conquor and regain the ring. That would have turned outpretty bad