Login | Register
 
Message Board | Latest Posts | Your Recent Posts | Rules

Thread: Who is Eleasar?

Is this discussion interesting? Share it on Twitter!

Bottom of Page    Message Board > Characters > Who is Eleasar?   
Hallo...

Though i have already seen all of the three movies (with the extended montaz) more that 10 times each i consider my self to be more that a beginer in the world of Tolkien as i just now started to read "The fellowship of the ring".

So I would like to ask who is "Eleasar". This is how Galadriel calls Aragorn when she says good bye to him (in the first of the three movies) and also this is how the great eye calls Aragorn in the last movie just before the last battle. Why Aragor weeps at that moment?

Thank...

well first off, Welcome to PT, enjoy your stay

by Eleasar do you mean Elessar, like my name??? well Elessar is Aragorn and that name is usually used to say Elessar the Elfstone, it is his elvish name, he used to live with the elves as a boy, but his usual name is Aragorn, whereas in Bree he known as Stider and so on, hope that helps if you need any help with anything else, just ask Orc Smiling Smilie
Elessar is one of Aragorn's many other names. It is his name as King. (he is not King Aragorn, he is king Elessar) I don't know, what it means, all I know is it's elvish, again, Im not sure which type of elvish (quenya or Sindarin)

anyone lese know??

hope this helps!
yes, the heirs of King Elendil goes straight down to Elessar/ Aragorn, so his name as king would be Elessar, the name that Galadriel herself named him, she gave him a green stone in a silver brooch when he left Lorien with the fellowship and told him ''take the name that was foretold for you, Elessar, the Elfstone of the house of Elendil!' she gave him the name

In fact, Elessar itself means "elfstone", which refers to the brooch given to Aragorn.
Quote:
Why Aragor weeps at that moment?

Because an Olog-hai was standing on his foot.
Many many thanks lads for the replies!!!

This comunity is great, in few hours i took 6-7 answers!!! Whow!!!

Philippos
I just spent a hour and a half writing and rewriting an essay about some of Elessar's other names and this damned website's input box ate both tries while I was trying to finalize them and before I hit the save post button. I'm pissed and quit for the day: I WON"T BE BACK UNTIL TOMORROW, IF THEN!!!

Sorry this happened in your thread Philippos, by the way, welcome to Planet-Tolkien.
Aragorn (his birthname; all Ranger chieftains' names begin with the prefix Ar-, which means 'noble'), Strider (by the ppl of Bree), Wingfoot (by Éomer), Longshanks (by BIll Ferny), Thorongil (name he took up while serving Thengel & Echtelion II, meaning 'eagle of the star'), Estel (his name in Rivendell, meaning 'hope'), Elessar (the name he was fated to carry, meaning Elfstone); Telcontar was the name he gave to his House, and is Elvish for Strider. Finally there's Envinyatar (which means Renewer), a title Aragorn gave to himself.

On a sidenote, there is also Barfagorn, which is used by some to distinguish the real Aragorn from the books, from the monstrosity appearing in the movies.
Elvish? "Ar"="noble?" You're slippin', my friend. I believe Telcontar is Quenya, is it not (unusual for a Numenorean lord, too, but he's Elendils Heir, I guess?) "Ar" of course means "king" in both Sindarin and Adûnaic (which I've likely misspelled, sorry.) "Noble" would, I think, be equivalent to "lord" for which the Sindarin and Quenya is "Tur" (as in our old friend Turambar; whether he's Master of Fate or Master of the World depends on whom you ask ;-)) I'm not even going to try to analyze the suffix, since there appear to be two possible (related) translations, and that only because Tolkien explicitly ruled out another (Robert Fosters.)

Yeah, I'm overanalyzing for no reason (other than the fact I've never liked the vague word "Elvish" since no such language exists, rather the three related tongues of the three kindreds of Quendi.) Sorry. I just couldn't resist the urge to give our beloved Vir a taste of his own medicine. ;-p

Maybe Eleasar is the son of Aaron who became King of Gondor? Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie
I am not so sure you succeded, my friend. Ar does mean noble. Tar means king or queen, depending who rules at the time. Elvish is a general term for all the elven languages, though we mostly see it used by people who doesn't know there are more than one elven language. It appears to be vague but valid, but I don't like it much either. Wink Smilie
OK people I'm still confuzzled.....ARAGORN....quenya or Sindarin....or one of the others??
Quote:
I believe Telcontar is Quenya, is it not (unusual for a Numenorean lord, too, but he's Elendils Heir, I guess?) "Ar" of course means "king" in both Sindarin and Adûnaic (which I've likely misspelled, sorry.)

a) Quenya is Elvish, but Elvish is not Quenya.
b) 'Ar-' does mean noble in Elvish (Sindarin). For instance Arwen = Ar + wen = 'noble maiden'. 'Ar' means King in Númenoran, like 'Ar-Pharazon'. I don't know what is the exact etymology of Aragorn's name, nor do I give a hoot.

Quote:
I just couldn't resist the urge to give our beloved Vir a taste of his own medicine. ;-p

It's OK, everyone is free to correct me if they feel I've erred... before they get banned. :-P

Quote:
(other than the fact I've never liked the vague word "Elvish" since no such language exists, rather the three related tongues of the three kindreds of Quendi.)

What's that supposed to mean? The Vanyar, Noldor & Teleri in Valinor speak Quenya; the Noldor in Beleriand started speaking Sindarin to be able to interact with their cousins of the Moriquendi, and Quenya merely became a formal language.

And where do you put the Avari? Some followers of Imin, Tata and Enel did refuse to follow Oromë. Those all had different tongues.

But since I'm not an expert on Elvish language (to my knowledge, Sindarin IS a form of Quenya, as is Nandorin & Telerin), I'll draw a line under this.
Grondy couldn't find the underline in Virumor's above post, so he edited it to add one. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie (Of course this leaves me open to retaliation, if he's a mind to it, but I doubt if I'm worth the bother.)
It was my understanding there was a "Telerin" language, but you know more of the later HoME volumes than I. In honesty though I don't recall hearing of a separate tongue for the Vanyar anywhere. Sindarin is a distinct language though, regardless of whether derived from Quenya, Telerin or both. Now, I'm not a linguist, even where Tolkien's concerned, and was forced to resort yet again to the Quenya/English Dictionary I discovered in the course of what I think is a common "Turambar" debate: is that Quenya or Sindarin? Well, obviously, to have the meaning in the Silm it must be Sindarin, because the Professor inexplicably assigned the meaning "world" to "ambar" in Quenya (most famously in the Oath of Elendil.) Said site states "tar" is the Quenya form of "royalty" and "ar" the Sindarin, but also states "tur" to be both the Sindarin AND Quenya word for "lord" and this seems to me the closest thing to the vague word "nobility."

"Aragorn" as "Dunedain" should be Sindarin, from which, IIRC, Adûnaic was derived in its turn.
I vote that Aragorn recieve a prize for having collected the most names in the fewest number of years on Middle Earth. Smile Smilie

Although many of Tolkien's characters collect more than one name as they wander about, Aragorn seems to have been given an overabundance of them.
It's logical that he got so many names. The bloke went everywhere, anyway. Even to Rhûn and Harad, where the stars are different.
Did Aragorn's record surpass that of Túrin?
Yes. And Aragorn gets even better marks for he didn't name himself..
what about Gandalf?
or Sauron...
Gandalf- Stormcrow by someone
bearer of bad news by grima though i think it was in Rohirom or something
then something with an O by the DWarfs
ahh, ifogot his elvish name....Istaldis...no.
something anyway
Gandalf
his "spirit" name
then theres all his titles
the grey, the bent, then all those insults Sauron has for him like "the stupid or something"...
well anyway

HAHAHAHA Mir can nolonger correct me for slang...well i guess he can but i quote...
Quote:
by the ppl of Bree


ppl?! what the **** does that mean??
Smile Smilie
from wikipedia
Quote:
* Olórin, his name in Valinor and in very ancient times. "Olórin was my name in my youth in the West that is forgotten". It is Quenya, and its meaning is associated with dreams (perhaps "dreamer" or "of dreams"), from the root ÓLOS-.
* Mithrandir, his Sindarin name, used in Gondor, and meaning Grey Pilgrim.
* Gandalf Greyhame, Gandalf is his name in the North, meaning Elf with the Staff
* Gandalf the Grey, and later Gandalf the White after he was reborn as the successor to Saruman.
* The White Rider (when mounted on the great horse Shadowfax), a reference to the Black Riders (Nazgûl)
* Stormcrow (a reference to his arrival being associated with times of trouble), often used by his detractors to mean he is a troublesome meddler in the affairs of others.
* Incánus (in the south), of unclear language and meaning. Tolkien changed his mind about it several times, varying between the Latin word incanus meaning grey, a possible Westron invention meaning Greymantle, an Elvish word Ind-cano meaning Mind Ruler, or even a form of Southron meaning "Spy of the North".
* Tharkûn (to the Dwarves), meaning probably Staff-man.
* Lathspell, not really a name he used but one given by Gríma Wormtongue who said:

"Lathspell I name you, Ill-news; and ill news is an ill guest they say." (The Two Towers, "The King of the Golden Hall") Compare with godspell "good news", later modified to "gospel".


ok, 9 names

Longshanks, Ranger, Elessar, and Envinyatar, The Renewer;
Telcontar in Quenya, Elessar the Elfstone, Wingfoot, and Strider.

and 9

unless someone can find more? i think i missed an obvious one
Yeah, you missed Aragorn son of Arathorn, and Thorongil that VIr already supplied, though we could add Isildurs Heir as well, I think. You also listed Elessar twice. Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie I'm getting ten or eleven.
There's also 'Cupcake', a name only muttered by the Queen in the matrimonial bed... ;-P
Not to mention His Highness the King. And then there is Daddy, Dad, Father, Papa, Pater,and Old Man depending on what Eldarion and his sisters were allowed to use.
Quote:
as in our old friend Turambar; whether he's Master of Fate or Master of the World depends on whom you ask

Just to be picky, it actually translates as Master of Doom. Pretty cool name.
On the meaning of Aragorn (I don't think anyone commented yet on this): the name is Sindarin in form, as said, but Tolkien explained in a late letter that the names in the line of Arthedain: '... are peculiar in several ways; and several, though S.(indarin) in form, are not readily interpretable.' JRRT, response to Richard Jeffery about the meaning of Aragorn.

In a text associated with The Tale of Aragorn & Arwen, Aragorn was said to be interpreted as 'Kingly Valour', but in the letter to Mr. Jeffery (1972) Tolkien noted that Aragorn does not mean *Tree-king... but did not explain what it does mean. He did explain the first element ara anyway: that it's probably derived from cases where aran 'king' lost its n phonetically (as Arathorn), ara- then being used in other cases (or ar-).

The fact that Tolkien's only 'direct' interpretation comes from a draft lends some doubt to the matter, especially considering his remarks in the later letter, and since in Sindarin the -g- in this name could be a result of lenition (a form of mutation found in the language that inspired Sindarin, that is, Welsh) some have speculated that -corn, instead of -gorn, might be involved.

Quote:
'... in the course of what I think is a common "Turambar" debate: is that Quenya or Sindarin? Well, obviously, to have the meaning in the Silm it must be Sindarin, because the Professor inexplicably assigned the meaning "world" to "ambar" in Quenya (most famously in the Oath of Elendil.) Said site states "tar" is the Quenya form of "royalty" and "ar" the Sindarin, but also states "tur" to be both the Sindarin AND Quenya word for "lord" and this seems to me the closest thing to the vague word "nobility."


Turambar is Quenya and has a Sindarin counterpart in Túramarth 'Master of Fate, Master of Doom' (listed under 'N(oldorin)' in Etymologies). Compare Amon Amarth 'Mount Doom'