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Thread: Rian

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I think it was the old "died of grief" chestnut, cos all girlies are girly like that, and just die when they ain't got no man. Wink Smilie
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How did Rian die? The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales simply stated that she laid herself down some mound where Huor was and died. Did she died of food, or did she kill herself?
In the index to The Silmarillion it says
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Rian ... wife of Huor and mother of Tuor; after Huor's death died of grief on the Haudh-en-Ndengin.
The Haudh-en-Ndengin 'The Mound of the Slain' was also known as "The Mound of Tears' where were piled the bodies of the Elves and Men that died in the Nirnaeth Arnoediad, the ruinous fifth battle in the Wars of Beleriand.

To answer your question, her grief was so strong that she pined-away; she simply gave up caring about anything and withered away due to lack of food, drink, and/or shelter.
Her grief was overwhelming, she abandoned his own baby son (Tuor) in the keeping of Annael and went to seek death on the grave of Huor. Pity we don't know more about Huor! He must have been a really nice man, to be so much loved by Rian!
In a way she committed suicide. Rian must have known that if she searches for her husband there will be no help in the wilderness. She even made sure that her young son has someone who cares for him. What brought her to that decision was preponderant grief, but I also suppose that Rian didnít saw a chance to raise and support Tuor. It would have been like in other cultures that a woman canít exist without a man.
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but I also suppose that Rian didnít saw a chance to raise and support Tuor. It would have been like in other cultures that a woman canít exist without a man.


I suppose having just lost her husband, and seen the hopes of the free people die in a terrible battle, she may have thought there was little hope for the future. I disagree, however, that the culture was such that a woman could not support a child on her own. Her cousin, Morwen, who married Huor's brother Hurin managed to keep her household together even though their lands were occupied by Easterlings. And then there was Haleth, Lord of the Haladin, who managed to lead her to people to safety after the death of her father.