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Thread: That OTHER Elvish Language Guild

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I have it on tape, but cd would be nice. My hubby told me he would transfer it for me, but he is a lazy bum, and trying to get him to do things takes forever
lol
I have to agree Sepdet, that Ardalambion is really a wonderful resource.
I will try to learn both Sindarian and Quenya, and see how far I make it! Big Laugh Smilie These links are great, thanks for posting them here. Big Smile Smilie
I would love to learn Sindarin Sepdet, maybe you could start some lessons, with the approval of the council, after the Quenya course has finished. This may be some time, however, since Cano_Yavanna, our usual teacher, has not been here for a couple of weeks. I rea;;y think we need to decide whether to discontinue the course until Cano returns, or to carry on, as I would be happy to teach.
Sepdet, that's a beautiful translation. Could you please tell me what the tune is that they set the song to?
Hmmm Plastic...I do really want BBC LotR...
I need to finish the Sindarin course on CoE; I'm only about halfway finished. Also I have this Latin PhD comp coming up in a few weeks. But maybe after that.

In the meantime, has anyone here heard the BBC radio dramatization of LOTR, which in my opinion is actually the best attempt anyone's ever made? (It sticks almost word for word to Tolkien, somewhat abridged, although alas as usual Bombadil got the axe).

The reason I ask is because they set m ost of the poems to music, and in particular, I utterly and completely adore the tune they gave "in western lands". Therefore one of my early goals in learning Sindarin, right after figuring out Legolas' prayer in TTT which was unsubtitled, was to translate this poem.

So, for what it's worth, here's In Western Lands in Sindarin. I occasionally sacrifice literal wording to keep the meter, so that it can be sung.


Vi dyr ennui nu Anor
Ned echuir lyth eriar
I yrn ethuiwar, nin nurar
Ar aew verin linnar.

In western lands beneath [the] Sun
In spring, flowers rise,
The trees bud, waters run,
And the (small) joyous birds sing.

Ennas d alfanui
A ferin 'irith gerir
I elenath, viriath fain,
Vi finnel gelfib dn.

There it is cloudless night
And shuddering beeches hold
The starry host*, jewels white,
On their branching hair.

*the word for "star" incorporates the word for "elf" so I didn't bother to add the adjective for "elvish"

S na veth bden im derel
Vi dath dofn tummen.
Atham meraid velig a tynd
Athan eryd bain beraidh

Here at my path's end I am lingering
In deep darkness buried.
Beyond towers strong and high
Beyond all mountains steep

Or 'waith bain nura Anor
A panl elin cuinar
-pedithon 'i-aur gwann'
Egor nan elin 'navaer'.

Above all shadows rides the Sun
And stars always dwell.
I will not say 'The day is done'
Or to the stars 'farewell'.



Quote:
In the meantime, has anyone here heard the BBC radio dramatization of LOTR, which in my opinion is actually the best attempt anyone's ever made?
Yes, I taped their program when NPR rebroadcast them in half-hour segments back in the early eighties. Since then I have worn out one set of the official BBC tapes and am working on the second. $69 US is a little steep for the tapes. I assume one of these years the BBC will offer their 12 hours of program on CD.

Both of Sam's songs (Gil-galad is the other) send chills up my spine so I bothered to memorize them.

[Edited on 2/5/2003 by Grondmaster]
Grondy, I'm pretty sure they already do, I'll check later. I've got it on CD, but only cos my Radio is hooked up to my PC.....
erm... if anyone REALLY wants a copy of the BBC Lotr on CD, then they should probably email me and see if we can work out some sort of arrangement *cough, cough*
I've seen them on CD in our local bookshop. From what I remember, they were being sold in sets of either three or four CDs. I cannot remember how much they were, but I remember thinking that I wouldn't be able to afford them for a while.
Also the BBC version is an adaptation, a radio play and as such is probably better than someone just reading the books aloud; however, as I haven't heard the latter, I may be misinformed. I really liked the radio play even though Tom Bombadil got left out of it too.
Okay, email plasticsquirrel@planet-tolkien.com and we'll have a bit of a chat about how it might just be possible for you to get your hands on CD copies of BBC Lotr...
Or, if you fear my methods, then you could just click on this link and pay an arm and a leg...

I would love to learn Sindarin, I always prefered it to Quenya it's the true language of the elves of middle earth. Non of this poncy latin type langauges (No offence sedepet!)
Also the BBC version is an adaptation, a radio play and as such is probably better than someone just reading the books aloud; however, as I haven't heard the latter, I may be misinformed. I really liked the radio play even though Tom Bombadil got left out of it too.

^ This a quote from one of Grondmasters posts---not sure how to quote!?

I actually have a copy of a man named Robert Ingels, I believe that is his name, reading the LOTR trilogy, unabridged.
I'm not sure if anyone has seen this before, but I have stumbled upon an Elven dictionary and grammar guide. It says it was produced by The Grey Company for role playing purposes. Maybe this may interest you Erbalwen?
I have actually attained this Elven Dictionary as an Ebook in pdf format. if you want you can try to download it from me, although i'm not sure how to go about doing this. I looked for any information that might show that it is a actual book, however, I did not find any (my eyes have grown heavy with sleep Smile Smilie ). I will look again and post later. I'm sorry if it is not a "real" book and you were hoping to find it at the library, but you are more than welcome to download it from me. Smile Smilie
The Elvish of the Grey Company (tel'Mithrim); Amin mela lle and all that, is not rere red ela a form of Tolkien's Elvish; rather, they take words from Quenya and Sindarin and firstmisl misspell them, then define them incorrectly, then mangle and oversimplify it by creating their own grammar. It is a very easy language to learn, since it always follows the rules; no exceptions. There are quirks, like three ways to pluralize a noun (you get to randomly pick whichever you like), and the fact that the words for I, me, my, and mine are all the same.