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Prior to this post, Valedhelgwath posted the following introduction.

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Assignment 9

Chapter 21... Of Turin Turambar


Over the past assignments we have seen that through most of the Silmarillion, Tolkien has dealt with his tale in a similar way to a historian covering events of real history. By this I mean he has looked at the larger picture, concentrating on realms and armies rather than on the individuals. This has given his work an ďepic-likeĒ feel to it, but has robbed it somewhat of the personal feel he presented in Lord of the Rings or the Hobbit.

Having said that, some of the chapters do contrast to this style by concentrating on the individuals, following their deeds in much more depth than those seen in other parts of the book. The tale of Luthien and Beren was one such chapter, and now this one, the tale of Turin Turambar, is similar.

The son of Hurin the Steadfast, Turin was sent by his mother, Morwen, to Doriath when he was eight years old. The Easterlings had occupied their homeland of Hithlum and Morwen feared they would enslave her son if he were to stay. In honour of Hurin, Thingol allowed Turin to stay in Doriath, and there he grew strong. After nine years in the elven realm, Turin bore the Dragon-helm of Dor-lomin and fought on the borders of Doriath alongside Beleg Strongbow.

One day on returning to the Menegroth, however, Turin accidentally caused the death of the elf Saeros, who had been tormenting him. Even though, in his absence Turin was pardoned of this deed by Thingol, he left Doriath, believing himself to be a hunted man. In desperation he joined a band of outlaws and soon became their leader, refusing to return to Doriath even when word of his innocence reached him. Unable to persuade Turin to return to Doriath, Beleg asked Thingolís permission to join Turin in the wilds.

He found Turin at Amon Rudh, where his company were staying in the caves of the Petty Dwarf, Mim. Mim had shown the outlaws the secret caves in ransom for his life, even though the outlaws had killed one of his sons, but later when captured by Morgothís spies, he showed them the secret paths too. The orcs attacked the outlaws while most of them were sleeping, capturing Turin and killing the rest of his men, only Beleg escaping.

Beleg followed the orc trail, and with the aid of Gwindor, an elf who had escaped from Angband, he rescued Turin. When Turin awoke, however, he mistook Beleg for his orc captures and slew him with the elfís own sword, Anglachel. In grief, Turin took this sword for his own and went with Gwindor to Nargothrond.

Turinís ill-luck followed him here too. Although he fought valiantly and found the ear of King Orodreth, one of his decisions proved disastrous for the elves. For long they remained hidden, fighting with stealth, but Turin urged them to go wage war against the orcs. To this end he had them build a huge stone bridge across the river Narog which guarded the gates of Nargothrond. He then took an army forth, but the enemy was stronger than any had expected, and Glaurung the dragon was among them. Orodreth and most of the warriors of Nargothrond were slain and Glaurung sacked the elven city.

Turin returned to Nargothrond in an attempt to rescue the Orodrethís daughter Finduilas and the other women who had been taken prisoner, but coming face to face with the dragon, he was charmed by the beastís sorcery. Turning aside from his quest, he travelled instead back to Hithlum in search of his mother. Finding her gone, he slew an Easterling chieftain and many of his men, before returning once more to rescue the elven maiden. The dragonís curse had had itís effect though, and by the time he returned, Finduilas was dead.

Again grieving, Turin lived for a while with some people of the House of Haleth, changing his ways and laying down his sword. While travelling one day he came across a young woman who appeared lost and without memory of who she was. Turin returned to the village with her and as time passed fell in love with her. She too, however, had been charmed by the dragon, and what neither she nor Turin knew when he married her, was that she was really his younger sister, born after he had first left Hithlum.

Turin again took up his sword and hunted Glaurung. He eventually managed to slay the creature, but sprayed with the dragonís acidic blood, Turin fainted. There his wife found him, and unable to rouse him, she believed him dead. In its dying breaths the dragon then managed to add a final curse to the unhappy tale by revealing to Niniel who she really was. In grief and guilt she cast herself off a cliff and was lost in the water.

Turin, however, was still alive, and when he awoke he returned to the village seeking his wife. There he discovered she was dead, and also who she really was. In grief he fled into the wilds, and ended his life upon his own sword.

Questions for discussion.

1) In contrast to the tale of Beren and Luthien, this tale has no happy ending. Although in both tales the heroes overcome overwhelming forces and fight valiantly, throughout, the story of Beren seems full of hope, whereas the tale of Turin seems dark and tragic. Further, Beren and Luthienís love seems pure, whereas that of Turin and Niniel is incestuous. Why are the fates of Beren and Turin so different?

2) There are several posts elsewhere in the forum () concerning the incestuous relationship between Turin and his sister. Although for biological reasons incest is regarded as taboo in most societies, were Turin and his sister really committing a sin here?

3) What differences can you see between the Petty Dwarves and the other Dwarves who you have encountered?

4) When Beleg pricked Turinís foot as he cut through the shackles with Anglachel, was this just an accident?

5) Through his life Turin bore several pseudonyms including Neithan, Gorthol, Agarwaen, Mormegil, Wildman of the Woods and Turambar. Particularly with the elves of Nargothrond he was unwilling to reveal his name and heritage. Why do you think this is?

6) Is there any relevance to the fact that Gurthang had broken when Turin had thrown himself upon its blade?



Arwen replied

2) I don't think that it counts as a sin if you don't know what you're doing is wrong. Man only began to sin when he understood what sin was. And although Turin and Niniel knew that incest was wrong, I believe that their ignorance of the facts is what makes them innocent. They could however have been found guilty if they had continued their incestuous relationship after they had discovered the truth.

5)Turin was ashamed of his past and the doom and misfortune that he seemed to bring to others and himself wherever he went. I think he was hoping to escape this doom by leaving his past and his name behind him.

6)The evil in the blade has now come to an end. It has wrought tremendous havoc and misery and now with the death of Turin it is finally satisfied.

Man, and I thought I felt sorry for Beren! First off, I like what you said in regards to question #5 Arwen Evenstar. I also think that Turin was so ashamed of his past, and possibly more importantly, so afraid of the curse that seemed to follow him wherever he went, that I think he honestly thought by changing his name, and by hiding his true identity that he could somehow escape the dark cloud that seemed to be always hanging over him. A good example of this I think can be found on pg. 252 when Turin gets mad at Gwindor for reveling his true identity and he states, ďBut now you have done ill to me, friend, to betray my right name, and to call my doom upon me, from which I would lie hidĒ. Obviously by making this statement, Turin really did think that maybe he could somehow hide, and run away from his doom. Also AE, I agree with your assessment of question #2. I feel that Turin, and Ninel were innocent in this matter as they were both cruelly victimized by Glaurungís treachery.

In regards to question #1, there are a few major reasons why I think the fates of Beren, and Turin were so different. Two of Turinís major faults that were key contributing factors to his doom I think were his pride, and stubbornness. It seems like to me that a lot of Turinís problems could have been easily avoided if these two character flaws didnít keep getting in the way. For example, everything that happened to Morwen, and Nienor (also Beleg) could have been completely prevented from the get go if only Turin could have swallowed his pride, and stubbornness after the accidental death of Saeros. Turin could have accepted Thingolís pardon (which he should have), gone back to Doriath (where he would have lived like a prince), and eventually his mother, and sister would have showed up there, and everything would have been fine. Also, he could have further prevented what happened to his mother, and sister (not to mention the downfall of Nargothrond) if only he would have heeded Ulmoís warning. But again, we see his pride, and stubbornness get in the way, and as a result, his mother is killed, Nargothrond is destroyed, and the curse of the great worm is put on his sister.

It also seems to me that everywhere Turin hung his hat, he always got a little too big for his britches. Whether it was at Amon Rudh, or Nargothrond, etcÖ Turin just stopped listening to anyone else, and just started ordering all things as he wished. Once again his pride, and stubbornness kept him from hearing the wise council of others. Beren had a lot of pride too, but Berenís pride was different, more of a humble pride if you will. Lastly (without going into too much detail, because this has already been discussed in great detail two chapters ago), another major difference between the fates of Beren, and Turin was the fact that Beren was the chosen one. Beren had destiny, Eru, and the help of the Valar on his side where it seems to me that Turin did not (probably due to his own fault). The one time he did receive some help from the Valar (Ulmoís warning) he didnít listen.
Elf Smilie
2 - Yes I believe that they were committing sin. Sin is sin. Not knowing does not negate the sin, it just gives a reason why it happened. A rather famous legal quote is "Ignorance is no excuse."

Still working on the other questions. Don't think I could top Elfstone on question 1 though.

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another major difference between the fates of Beren, and Turin was the fact that Beren was the chosen one. Beren had destiny, Eru, and the help of the Valar on his side where it seems to me that Turin did not.
Well done Elfstone. I was wondering if anyone would pick up on this point. Although Beren and Turin were very different people, as you pointed out, and Turin's pride and stubborness went a long way to causing his downfall, both of them were being manipulated by higher powers.

On the one hand we have Beren, who was an instrument of Eru. His life is full of tragedy and sorrow, but reading his story fills you with hope. In addition the relationship he has with Luthien even feels blessed as you read it.

On the other hand, Morgoth has placed a terrible curse upon the family of Hurin. Morgoth is dark and evil and vile. I always feel the story of Turin's life reflects this mood as you read it. Even the way Tolkien has written the two stories is different, that of Beren often containing descriptions of nightingales and sweet fragrances, whereas the Turin story contains more mention of winter, cold and darkness. In a way these two stories are the antithesis of each other.
And what about parallels between the stories of Beren and Turin? There are many parallels, too:
(1) Both of them are nobly born, sons of lords and heroes, but both become dispossessed, humble exiles who must seek their fortune among strangers.
(2) Both Beren and Hurin become friends and brothers-in-arms with Elves and in both cases their Elven friends pay a great price for that friendship. Finrod Felagund is slain when trying to save Beren. Beleg also dies trying to save Turin. Gwindor, another Elven friend of Turin, is also slain because of deeds of Turin during the sack of Nargothrond.
(3) Both Beren and Turin win love of beautiful Elven maidens (Beren: Luthien, Turin: Nellas and Finduilas)
Also the story of Tuor bears many similarities to these two stories. In facts, they represent largely three versions of the same story, about a young dispossessed hero striving to make his fortune by joining a new people. The life story of Tolkien, it seems... He also was a poor orphan who had to win his social status all by himself - and suceedeed!
Good to see you back around, Eryan. I agree with what you say about the similarities between these three stories. Nice analogy to Tolkein's life too.

I don't want to jump too far ahead with the story of Tuor, but he too was blessed with the favour of a Valar, in his case, Ulmo.
1) Firstly and most importantly, I would want to state this major difference and that is Beren went to face his destiny, while Turin ran away from his. I think this is the major difference that cause the stories to have two very separate endings. As can be read, Turin gave up many chances yo redeem himself in the story.
2) It is a debate and I can't decide. They were both ignorant of the fact that they were brothers and sisters. Ignorance without ability to tell right from wrong is acceptable, but ignorance with the ability to distinguish right and wrong is a sin. Besides Turin's sister and...ahem wife, had a foreboding about their marriage and should have question it instead of pushing it to the back of her mind.
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1) Firstly and most importantly, I would want to state this major difference and that is Beren went to face his destiny, while Turin ran away from his. I think this is the major difference that cause the stories to have two very separate endings. As can be read, Turin gave up many chances to redeem himself in the story.
That's a very good point too, MadWannabe. Had he stayed in Doriath the story would read very differently. He would still have Morgoth's curse upon him, and staying in Doriath would probably bring this evil attention to Thingol's realm, but Turin would appear more like a hero defending the borders than the outlaw he became.

Question 2, about his incestuous relationship with his sister has been answered by several of you, and as I expected your views differ. From the point of view of this assignment, there is no right or wrong answer. Personally, if I were their judge, I would say they knowingly committed no crime. They had no idea they were related (in fact Turin did not even know he had a younger sister), and they had both been charmed by Glaurung.

Had they known they were brother and sister, or had they continued with such a relationship after discovering this fact, then yes, I believe they would be committing a great wrong. As it is, however, I believe a person has to show intent for a crime to be a sin, and of this they were not guilty.
Hi Val, thanks for your welcome!
In "Unfinished Tales" where the story of Turin is told in more detail Turin does not want to accept the pardon of Thingol because he does not want to forsake his new compoanions, the outlaws. This is a very noble reason, not an act of pride.
Turin was all the time "swimming againts the current". He was proud and many of his deeds were rash. But he was as steadfast in his resistance against Melkor as his own father Hurin. He finished by killing in anger an innocent man (Brandir) and then by killing himself, but he never yielded to Melkor.
I very much agree with you there, Eryan. In fact the Unfinished Tales version of this story shows Turin in a much more symaphetic light all together than he is seen in the Silmarillion.

Obviously Christopher Tolkien had to make sacrifices in what he edited out to make the Silmarillion, but it is rather sad that he butchered Turin so much. I highly recommend anyone who likes this particular story to try and read the full version from UT as JRR Tolkien wrote it.
The story of Turin has many other versions as well. During my Christmas holidays I could at last read the early versions from the History of ME (Vol. 2: The Book of Lost Tales, Vol. 3: The Lays of Beleriand) and I found them definitely worth reading. In Vol. 3 we have a beautiful description of Lake Ivrin where Turin was healed of his despair after having accidentally klled his friend Beleg. It is one of the most beautiful places in whole ME. I also was profoundly moved by the last words of the spirit of Beleg parting to Mandos, addressed to Turin: "Courage be thy comfort, comrade lonely". I like them so much that I even thought about putting them in my signature...
3) What differences can you see between the Petty Dwarves and the other Dwarves who you have encountered?

4) When Beleg pricked Turinís foot as he cut through the shackles with Anglachel, was this just an accident?

Does anyone wish to attempt these two before we move on, or have any queries of their own concerning this chapter?
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3) What differences can you see between the Petty Dwarves and the other Dwarves who you have encountered?
I felt the petty dwarves were smaller and more secretive never having much to do with Elves nor Men.

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4) When Beleg pricked Turinís foot as he cut through the shackles with Anglachel, was this just an accident?
This certainly wasn't an accident it was the swords viciousness, the malice of Eol rearing its ugly head and taking a bite where it could, towards bringing down the first of its weilders.
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This certainly wasn't an accident it was the swords viciousness, the malice of Eol rearing its ugly head and taking a bite where it could, towards bringing down the first of its weilders.
I'd always thought that it was the sword causing mischief here, it's actions bringing about the whole turn of events that led to the death of Beleg. I always saw the sword as being malign to all, but I'm not sure this is the case anymore. Just prior to Turin killing himself upon it, the sword says to him,
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"Yea, I will drink your blood gladly, that so I may forget the blood of Beleg my master, and the blood of Brandir slain unjustly. I will slay thee swiftly."
These words make me think Anglachel perhaps had respect for Beleg and was embittered with Turin for slaying him. This same passage is described in more detail in the Book of Lost Tales. Here Beleg uses his sword to cut the bonds because he has dropped his knife while rescuing Turin from the orc camp. In this early passage, he cuts Turin because his hand slips in the dark (although why darkness would effect an elf is overlooked here).

I'm now in two minds as to what was at play here, whether 1) it was a tragic accident, 2) It was Anglachel causing mischief, or 3) It was Morgoth's curse upon Hurin's kin doing the damage.
A small doubt. Why wouldn't Glaurung kill Turin when he had the chance while he had him enchanted? Why would he let him go?

Is it like "Fate it seems..."??? *In a Morpheus like voice!!*
I think that had something to do with cruelty, Floyd. Why doesn't a cat kill the mouse it has caught? To the dragon it was a cruel game. It set in motion a whole series of tragedies for Turin to live through and be tormented by. In part this may possibly have been an influence of Melkor, who was keen to see the children of Hurin suffer.

The dragon was hugely intellegent, but its weakness was arrogance. If it had know Turin would eventually return and kill him, he maybe would have killed him while he had the chance. Over confident in its own strength, however, it arrogantly did not concider Turin a threat.
What was the exact nature of the curse that Morgot put upon Hurin?

It also leads me to think. If Morgoth could put a curse on Hurin like that, why wouldn't he just put a curse on all the humans and be done with it? I mean, exactly what is it that allows Morgoth to put such curses on people and make em work? How come he was able to put a curse on Hurin just like that?
From The Fifth Battle: Nirnaeth Arnoediad

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Then Morgoth cursed Hurin and Morwen and their offspring, and set a doom upon them of darkness and sorrow; and Hurin from prison he set in a chair of stone upon a high place of Thangorodrim. There he was bound by the power of Morgoth, and Morgoth standing beside him cursed him again; and he said: "Sit now there; and look out upon the lands where evil and despair shall come upon those whom thou lovest. Thou hast dared to mock me, and to question the power of Melkor, Master of the fates of Arda. Therefore with my eyes thout shall see, and with my ears thou shalt hear; and never shalt thou move from this place until all is fulfilled unto its bitter end."


This was how Melkor tortured Hurin in a bid to learn the whereabouts of Gondolin from him.

The reason he did not curse the whole of mankind in this manner, is probably because it would have taken far too much effort. This was a special curse for a special hero.
1) First off Turin had Morgoth's curse upon him, which Beren didn't.... That there is enough to end all debate, but i'll go on.... Yes Beren met his destiny, where as it appeared Turin was runing away. I think sub-consciously Turin left to protect the ones he loved (it was his fate.) That is until he renamed himself "Turambar" which signifies "Master of Doom" Therefore he thought he mastered his doom, and chose to stay with his sister, and there he did NOT run away from his fate, but met it tragically.

2) Well this question stumps me... because no matter how you look at the situation IT IS A SIN, but in this case i might just make an exception because of Melkor and Glaurung they did not realize the full situation. VOID THIS ANSWER BECUAE I'M FLABBERGASTED.

3) The petty dwarves didn't live in some huge deep underground mansion... they did live in secrecy. they were small in numbers, where as most dwarves lived in masses.

4) It was fate that guided Beleg's hand, which pricked Turin's foot. It was Morgoths curse in effect, which caused Turin much sorrow.

5)Turin did not like to reveal his true name, because he knew that ill luck followed him, and would continue to do so, so long as he flaunted his true title. He thought if he could hide his past, he could hide his curse. (he was unaware of Morgoth's curse, but he knew something was up.)

6)Yes. Gurthang was a black sword that matched Turin's black mood, their fate was intertwined. I don't believe another soul could wield Gurthang with as much prowess as Turin could, and no other weapon would have gotten Turin as far as he did. Once again, it was fate of those 2.


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ELFSTONE
Beren had destiny, Eru, and the help of the Valar on his side where it seems to me that Turin did not (probably due to his own fault). The one time he did receive some help from the Valar (Ulmoís warning) he didnít listen.


i really have to disagree with you. If you believe in destiny and i think you do because you just admitted it, then you have to agree to the fact that everyone has a destiny; whether it for good or ill. You say it's Turin's own fault for his ill luck but i think it's more accurate to blame Morgoth, we has the one who put the unbreakable, dreadful curse on Hurin and his family. I can't recall the part where Ulmo and Turin meet, and i can't find my book, could you quote it for me please?

Fate and destiny are the same, are they not? I said this many times before, and i'll say it again. From the beginning when the music was created, that was a glimps of Arda and it's history, am i right? If it is, then that means Arda is guided by fate, and the actions of the characters are controlled by a higher power. Turambar's fate may seem like ill luck.... but in the end isn't he the one that slays Morgoth in the final battle?
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I mean, exactly what is it that allows Morgoth to put such curses on people and make em work? How come he was able to put a curse on Hurin just like that?


Morgoth was originally a Valar... aka a god. what couldn't he do?
Nice analysis of Turins fatal flaw(s) from Elfstone. Due to my nature, I make a distinction I think might be helpful here: honor vs. pride. Beren had honor aplenty; he would not forsake his quest or his pledge, would not allow Luthien to live beneath herself with him as an outlaw and in despite of his pledge. His word was his bond. Turin, whether from nature or from the malice of Morgoth, had PRIDE. Thus he is unwilling to accept Thingols pardon, and likely resents the need of it, and when he comes to Nargothrond the manner in which Finrod kingdom has survived since the fifth battle (I will not attempt to spell it as it always ends in tears, so to speak) deeply offends his pride. He simply must meet his foe in open combat, and the odds are irrelevant. Again, whether from his nature or Morgoths ill will, this quality is the more destructive as Man and Elf alike are inevitably swayed by his counsel to rash and unfortunate agreement. In many ways he is reminiscent of Feanor: tremendous in stature but with an anger and pride that dooms him as assuredly as the wiles of his enemies.

At the risk of calling Anglachel from its sheath, I DO distinguish between fate and destiny, holding that the latter, at least in most cases, does not apply: some things, like the coming of Beren to Doriath, are fated, but fate merely contributes to the shaping of ultimate destinies that remain determined by their recipients. In the case of Turin (the other one,) given the influence of Morgoth, his destiny could have been resolved in sundry ways, but none of them would have been good.

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1) In contrast to the tale of Beren and Luthien, this tale has no happy ending. Although in both tales the heroes overcome overwhelming forces and fight valiantly, throughout, the story of Beren seems full of hope, whereas the tale of Turin seems dark and tragic. Further, Beren and Luthienís love seems pure, whereas that of Turin and Niniel is incestuous. Why are the fates of Beren and Turin so different?


Morgoth, with maybe pride contributing as well (Morgoth didn't determine Turins nature, after all.)

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2) There are several posts elsewhere in the forum () concerning the incestuous relationship between Turin and his sister. Although for biological reasons incest is regarded as taboo in most societies, were Turin and his sister really committing a sin here?


For obvious reasons, I can't provide quotes for you, but I hold sin requires both knowledge and intent, neither of which were present here (Niniel/Nienors foreboding doesn't count, as it didn't really tell her anything.) Within the context of Tolkiens world, it was the suicides that weighed most heavily on their fates with Mandos.

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3) What differences can you see between the Petty Dwarves and the other Dwarves who you have encountered?


It's hard to note many, especially since we see the Petty Dwarves nowhere else. If anything, their feelings toward Elves was even more heated than that later held by the true Naugrim, but being hunted like game will do that. They were secretive, but so are all Dwarves, revealing their language, their true names and their women to none. The only glaring example I can see is reflected in the name, and less innate than circumstantial; I would compare it to the differences between the Moriquendi and the Eldar.

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4) When Beleg pricked Turinís foot as he cut through the shackles with Anglachel, was this just an accident?


No, this was Morgoth doing a little jig in Angband.

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5) Through his life Turin bore several pseudonyms including Neithan, Gorthol, Agarwaen, Mormegil, Wildman of the Woods and Turambar. Particularly with the elves of Nargothrond he was unwilling to reveal his name and heritage. Why do you think this is?


See above. As others have noted, while Turin was not likely aware of his father fate (though I seem to recall someone, I believe Gwindor, commenting on it while Hurin remained a prisoner) he would have had to be a stone blind fool to think his trail of wreckage was entirely happenstance.

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6) Is there any relevance to the fact that Gurthang had broken when Turin had thrown himself upon its blade?


Likely between him and Beleg Gurthang, the only sentient blade of which we hear in Tolkiens work (which makes you wonder about its mate born by Eol,) was by then as disgusted with life and its griefs as was Turin. To the extent it WAS a sentient blade, like Turin, it had been the bane of everyone it had ever Loved.

Sigh, summaries can only go so far, but it's typical of Tolkien that the brother of the Nolda slain to provoke Fingons forces from cover, who led that charge and was captured, should reappear in the tale of Turin. Loose ends were an anomaly in Tolkiens seamless world, yet another mark of his mastery.
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Morgoth, with maybe pride contributing as well (Morgoth didn't determine Turins nature, after all.)

I think Morgoth's curse on Hurin's offspring, plus Glaurung's spell on Nienor, was the major contributing factor.

Turin was so good in battle that his pride would never have caused his downfall, without any curses set on him. That's the difference between him and Boromir (sorry Denethor, but he sucked).

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Sigh, summaries can only go so far, but it's typical of Tolkien that the brother of the Nolda slain to provoke Fingons forces from cover, who led that charge and was captured, should reappear in the tale of Turin. Loose ends were an anomaly in Tolkiens seamless world, yet another mark of his mastery.

I don't know what you're speaking of here.
Gwindor, I believe it was, who guided Turin to Nargothrond after the slaying of Beleg. It was Gwindor who, by a stroke of bad luck, happen to be along the section of line that beheled the slaying of his brother before the Battle of Unnumbered Tears and, enraged, rushed forth for vengeance, followed by the host of Fingon, who could no longer be restrained. You'd think that would be the end of it, but no, Tolkien tells us he was taken alive while the rest of his fellows who penetrated deep into the enemy force were all slain, and returns just in time to be Finduilas' jilted beau who unwittingly brings the doom of Nargothrond in Turin.
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4) When Beleg pricked Turinís foot as he cut through the shackles with Anglachel, was this just an accident?


No, this was Morgoth doing a little jig in Angband.


I believe here, part of the malice Eol placed in Anglachel was responsible. It is perhaps by Morgoth's cruel curse that Beleg chose Anglachel in the first place, but I feel it was the sword doing its own will that pricked Turin's foot.
Yet Anglachel indicates affection, or at least respect, for Beleg at Turins death, and surely had no way to know what result from the seemingly trivial knick to Belegs foot, right?

Edit: No, the death of Turin was not a trivial event, at least not to Turin.
Elf Confused Smilie Me no understand previous post? Maybe author need go night-night; or maybe me do too. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
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Yet Anglachel indicates affection, or at least respect, for Beleg at Turins death, and surely had no way to know what result from the seemingly trivial knick to Belegs foot, right?

Anglachel just had a crush on Beleg, that's all.

Even swords have emotions, you know.

I wonder though, if Anglachel could really speak, and if it wasn't just Tķrin who had eaten the wrong mushrooms.