Login | Register
 
Message Board | Latest Posts | Your Recent Posts | Rules

Thread: hello...

Is this discussion interesting? Share it on Twitter!

Bottom of Page    Message Board > Introduce yourself! > hello...   
Hey.. I've finally found a place where others are as crazy as I am about Tolkien and his works! I was beginning to think that that was impossible.
I'm 16 and I have always been into Tolkien, but over the last year it has become a real thing of mine. I'm beginning to realise, I think, that TLOTR is literally the tip of the iceburg and there is so much more! I'd really love to meet some more people who are genuinely serious about Tolkien's work- not just film buffs.
Thanks all
xx
You have come to the right spot Nólatári, and may I welcome you to Planet-Tolkien. Happy Elf Smilie The greater majority of our members were fans of Tolkien's writings before the movies came out and we searched far and wide until we found a home here with like minded people with whom we can share our views about the occurrances in Middle-earth and beyond.
Hello, I hope and trust that you'll feel at home here. Enjoy your stay.
Welcome to PT, have a great time!
Howdy and welcome, Nólatári (I can just about figure out what that means; yea!) Looks like perhaps Celebrian has found her fellow sixteen year old, and didn't take long at all. The movies, don't get me started on the movies. Blonde Quendi everywhere, fie! Everything else I might could forgive, but Frodo sending Sam home from Mordor was the anvil that broke the camels back. You don't just turn around and go home from Cirith Ungol, and besides, Frodo would never have done that. The unbreakable friendship of Sam and Frodo is one of the great themes and great beauties of the Trilogy; even the Ring could only slightly damage, but never destroy it.

And yes, the Trilogy is just the tip of the iceberg. I really need to read it again since it's been so long, but my heart will always belong to the Silmarillion. You can enjoy the Trilogy without it, no question, but it improves even more on so many levels in the context of the Silmarillion (in which the Trilogy gets about thirty pages.) The Trilogy heroes are unquestionably great, but their stature simply can't compare to those of the Elder Days Yet again I say Feanor would've made short work of Sauron (heck, Finrod Felagund almost took him. I personally think Aragorn is the equal of Beren or the other Men of the First Age, but don't ask me to prove it.

The bittersweet sorrow only alluded to in the Trilogy of the Eldar, much "diminished," to use Galadriels word, from their grandeur in the First Age, of a world that was wholly theirs now witnessing the last of their greatness before those last Eldar depart forever is far more keenly felt and shared by the reader with a familiarity with the Silmarillion. Some may (and do) debate the merits of History of Middle-Earth, but the Silmarillion is a must. Otherwise it's like learning the American Revolution by studying Yorktown.

Of course, you may be including that when you call the Trilogy the tip of the iceberg (I've found the level of dedication/fanaticism at this site much higher than I've encountered anywhere else; I fit in, which is disturbing) in which case I'll be very red in the face. However, if not, and you've wondered about Gil-Galad, Earendil, and Varda (to name but a few; I'm not gonna cover the whole Quenta Silmarillionin a post) there's your source. I lament the lack of Trilogy level detail, but Tolkien never finished it, despite working on if for almost sixty years. It's comprehensive, but leaves me wanting more (perhaps inevitably.) For me, that's where History of Middle-Earth comes in, but that's confusing enough if you HAVE read the Silmarillion; it would be impossible without it.

Again, welcome and enjoy your stay.
welcome Nólatári. hope you have fun.

now for your post Morambar...

Quote:
I lament the lack of Trilogy level detail, but Tolkien never finished it, despite working on if for almost sixty years


well, it was ment to be a sequel to the hobbit and to be published with the Sil so there you go. also, i thought he DID finish the Trilogy?


Quote:
For me, that's where History of Middle-Earth comes in, but that's confusing enough if you HAVE read the Silmarillion

yes and also Unfinished Tales

Quote:
I say Feanor would've made short work of Sauron (heck, Finrod Felagund almost took him.

yep and Fingolfin (in my ever humble opinion) almost took Morgoth

Quote:
And yes, the Trilogy is just the tip of the iceberg

funny, if a tip of the ice burg is about 25% of an ice burg than LOTR is less than that...1,200 about for LOTR and a little mor for hobbit compared to 4,600. about, all is about
I was referring to the Silmarillion as the ultimate Unfinished Tale; the Trilogy was, of course completed. Also of course, while it was Tolkien himself who intended the Hobbit and then the Trilogy to pave the way for it, it was a much earlier story in origin, yet remained a collection of disjointed and oft revised manuscripts his whole life (the status of Beren in LT2 still warps my mind.) Can't believe I left Fingolfin out, the noblest and most hopeless stand of the Noldor. Sauron would've gotten as far as "I am the Da-!"

Yes, Nólatári, we are quite mad, in a harmless sort of way.
Yes I can see that !
And so what if the tip of an iceburg is 25%...it was a figure of speech.
Quote:
I say Feanor would've made short work of Sauron (heck, Finrod Felagund almost took him.

It is not mentioned in the Silmarillion that Finrod almost took Sauron. It was mentioned they fought a duel, which was won by Sauron, that's all. There's nothing which can make me conclude that the duel was close in any way.

It is true though that Sauron was a lousy warrior, as he was defeated by Elendil and Gil-galad, amongst others : no wonder he was surrounding himself with Orcs and Easterlings and hiding back in his tower.

Quote:
yep and Fingolfin (in my ever humble opinion) almost took Morgoth

He only gave him seven wounds : is that almost taking Morgoth ? Morgoth was so big that Fingolfin could only reach Morgoth's shins with his sword. It's actually funny, now that i think of it.

Fingolfin should perhaps have used the tactics Mickey Mouse used in that Disney cartoon in which he defeated that giant.

Quote:
Otherwise it's like learning the American Revolution by studying Yorktown.

Or learning the American Revolution by watching The Patriot.