Login | Register
 
Message Board | Latest Posts | Your Recent Posts | Rules

Thread: Traveller drops by

Is this discussion interesting? Share it on Twitter!

Bottom of Page    Message Board > Introduce yourself! > Traveller drops by   
Greetings all. Most of you probably haven't met me before, and my past posts are probably buried so deep I'm no longer remembered, but hi to any who do remember me. Most likely I'm just passing by, but just having a nose around my old home.

Hello, Valedhelgwath. It's nice to meet you! Will you spend some time with us? Smile Smilie

Greetings Indis. Since getting married and promoted at work (back in 2004) I seemed to lose most of my spare time. I'm afraid with one thing and another I don't get in here very often at all now days - In fact tomorrow I am due back at sea until the 29th, so will be offline again. It's good to nip in every once in a while though to catch up with old friends who are still around and meet new members.

Oh, 2004? That's a lot of time. Good to know you didn't abandon the place completely.

Are you a sailor if I may ask? That's interesting.

Val is one, if not the best, fan fiction writer of PT! His stories are superb!! Its great to see you around again Waving Hello Smilie

Oh my word~ Val, the esteemed council member I have longed to hear from. You have NO idea how many times I read your bio. And all the posts I read, oh how I wish Grondy were here tonight, he would be so pleased to have you, our real mariner back if only for a moment.

I thank you from the bottom of my Elvish heart for coming by. Please give my regards to your family and if you get a chance come back and share some thing with us.

Oh, wow... I am still recognised. I'm honoured.

Quote:
Are you a sailor if I may ask? That's interesting.

I'm a fishery officer/marine biologist. This involves me going away to sea fairly frequently for short periods either on patrol or conducting surveys. I'm currently conducting cockle stock assessments in anticipation of a coming fishery.

 

Quote:
Val is one, if not the best, fan fiction writer of PT! His stories are superb!! Its great to see you around again

Hi Thorin. Good to see you are still around - and enjoying the fan fiction (if a little generous with your accolades). I'm afraid the writing is something else I had to stop. I write quite a few scientific reports at work and I find the style they have to be written in is totally alien to creative writing. The two are so different, I find I cannot write creatively for ages after writing a report. When I do, creativity then starts creeping into my reports and I have to go back and edit it all out. There may be a few stories I wrote later that aren't on PT but which I put here http://www.freewebs.com/valedhelgwathfiction/index.htm

 

Quote:
Oh my word~ Val, the esteemed council member I have longed to hear from. You have NO idea how many times I read your bio. And all the posts I read, oh how I wish Grondy were here tonight, he would be so pleased to have you, our real mariner back if only for a moment.

I thank you from the bottom of my Elvish heart for coming by. Please give my regards to your family and if you get a chance come back and share some thing with us.

Thank you, Leelee. I still receive some of the council emails, and it was a recent one from you that prompted me to call back here - your wish is granted . I recently upgraded my PC and lost my old login codes, so cannot currently access the Council google-groups, but be assured my thoughts are with you, too. I just wish all wishes were so easy to fulfill.

And Grondy. I don't think a day passes where I don't still think about him.

 

I will try not to be such a stranger in future, although the days of being able to write long posts are over, I'm afraid - I just don't have enough free time anymore. That inability was why I eventually drifted away. It was nice to be able to sit down for a hour and compile a detailed response to some topic or another, so when that free time disappeared, it was frustrating no longer being able to do that.

I'm a fishery officer/marine biologist. This involves me going away to sea fairly frequently for short periods either on patrol or conducting surveys. I'm currently conducting cockle stock assessments in anticipation of a coming fishery.

That's incredibly interesting if you'd ask me! And it sounds like a hard work too. Glad to meet you, biologist - officer - tolkienist! Big Smile Smilie

There may be a few stories I wrote later that aren't on PT but which I put here http://www.freewebs.com/valedhelgwathfiction/index.htm

 

I've read all but the last three!! Thanks for sharing! **rubs hand in glee**

 

PS: Balin's Folly is my favourite!! Big Smile Smilie

So one of our phoenixes rise from the ashes it seems. How dare you call yourself a "traveller"? Val you are always a sight for sore eyes. And I have to agree with Thorin, great stories you have written in the past now I just need to check out these new ones....

Yes please do come as often as you can. One sentence from you is purest mithril and would be so gratefully received. i have waited and hoped for this moment since the first time I went on the page that showed the council members and the alumni. It is a dream cpme true, and thankyou so much to whomever let you know my deep wish. You have no idea how it helps me right now.

Gimli is right, you are first council and to be revered and honored for all time on this Middle-Earth. Somehow when I think of you despite your description of what you do, I see you as Cirdan  the ship builder, a master of his trade. Because you wrote and wrote which is to me building images and stories word by word, I see you as that rather than just a mariner , i have always seen you as that. And the vividness of your picture made me feel the mist of the water as the wind hit it, feel the wood of the ship under you, and hear the gulls above your head. It has just stuck with me.

So happy to see you Gimli, I love your posts.

Hi Val! nice to meet you.

I have read a little bit this thread and I have a question, don't you miss to be touching the soil when you are in a ship for weeks? I'm much scared about the sea. It's beautiful but too immense and furious sometimes. I admire people who "lives" or stays there for long journeys.

Back home for a day to top up on fuel and water - hopefully another three days at sea and the surveys will be finished.

Thank you all for the greetings and kind comments - I really do feel humbled. It makes me regret drifting away like I did.

Quote:
I've read all but the last three!! Thanks for sharing! **rubs hand in glee**

PS: Balin's Folly is my favourite!!

Quote:
And I have to agree with Thorin, great stories you have written in the past now I just need to check out these new ones....

Thank you, Thorin and Gimli. I'm pleased you enjoyed the stories. I hope the three later ones aren't too disappointing. By the time I wrote those I was writing scientific reports fairly regularly to the detriment of creative writing. I do have a final one from 2007 as well that never got put on my site (I lost the passwords to update it). It's about Aragorn and Gandalf sharing a conversation around a campfire one peaceful evening prior to Frodo and Sam leaving the Shire. While I've been told I write a good Dwarf story, my own favorites are the ones with the rangers in. I'll try to post that one somewhere for you.

Thank you, too, Leelee for your kind words. Don't underestimate your own contribution to this site though. It is you, Ama, Vir and Loss who have helped Taz keep this site running long after myself and the early council members drifted away. You have all done the site proud.

Quote:
That's incredibly interesting if you'd ask me! And it sounds like a hard work too. Glad to meet you, biologist - officer - tolkienist!

Very pleased to meet you, too, Indis. I've enjoyed reading your recent posts. I've not had time to delve into any of the recent conversations with any great depth, but I look forward to familiarizing myself with some of them in the coming weeks and joining you in them.

Physically, the job's not as hard as when I used to be a fisherman, but the hours can be quite long. This past trip we were starting about 3:30-4:00 am each day and not finishing until about 9 or 10pm. I'm a bit of a slave driver at times, but we have to work by the tides and the weather. I find time flies out there though, so it only seems like we are doing a normal 8 hour day.

Quote:
Hi Val! nice to meet you.

I have read a little bit this thread and I have a question, don't you miss to be touching the soil when you are in a ship for weeks? I'm much scared about the sea. It's beautiful but too immense and furious sometimes. I admire people who "lives" or stays there for long journeys.

Good to meet you, too, Elbereth. Strangely, the opportunity to miss soil doesn't really arise for me. Most of my work  is conducted in an estuary on the east coast of England called The Wash. The waters are really shallow there, and most of my work involves surveying the shellfish beds that live on the sandbanks and mudflats that dry out twice/day. Although I go to work in a boat, a lot of the time we dry out on sandbanks and then conduct the surveys on foot. Maybe not soil, but be assured I get plenty of sand and mud. When we are working at high water, we use a grab to collect samples from the sandbanks beneath us. Again, I get plenty of mud to sift through. Sometimes on the deeper water surveys, or when on patrol, we are afloat for days at a time, but we are generally close enough to see land in the distance. Sometimes, particularly at night, I tend to forget I am sea. The boat becomes the boundary of my world and it is just like not leaving your house or garden for a few days at a time. I find though when I get home, for the first day I feel as though my chair is rocking whenever I sit down.

I understand your fear of the sea though. It is immensely powerful and requires absolute respect.

If you are interested, check out a little site I made several years ago which shows my workplace. http://www.freewebs.com/esfjc/index.htm

 

edit... Thorin, I have managed to log into the fiction site. Unfortunately, the template was so old it would not allow me to add any new pages to the existing site, but I was able to add the Aragorn/Gandalf story to the bottom of one of the others already there. If you open the link for the Old Rock story, you will find another called Peace Before the Storm at the bottom of it. Hope you enjoy.

Your work and the Wash sound very soothing and peaceful. I love to anchor in rather shallow water and just listen, breathe deeply and think. On those days I prefer the sky to be slightly overcast with only a hint of golden sun. How wonderful for you. That sort of job in Canada , especially on west coast would pay buckets.

But what of your family, do they not miss you terribly when you don't return home at night? The man who raised me was both a passenger and freight conductor on the CPR railway and he was gone as much as a week at a time. I did not like that .

Greetings, Valedhelgwath. I too have read some of your works, and it's quite good, I must say.

All I know is that you're a council member, but I hadn't seen any posts from you (not sure though), during the time I've been a member of this site. Oh well, I originally registered over five years ago, but then I left and returned over two years ago, if my memory doesn't fail me.

Anyway, I'm Oerath, or Oerath Windsoul, artistically, and pleased to meet ya.

I'm a writer, maybe a bit of a poet and a musician by myself.

Thank you all for the greetings and kind comments - I really do feel humbled. It makes me regret drifting away like I did.

While I'm sure you were missed by those who remembered you, I'd say don't regret it - it is natural sometimes, especially during busy times!

Very pleased to meet you, too, Indis. I've enjoyed reading your recent posts. I've not had time to delve into any of the recent conversations with any great depth, but I look forward to familiarizing myself with some of them in the coming weeks and joining you in them.

I'm looking forward to see your opinions then!

I'm a bit of a slave driver at times, but we have to work by the tides and the weather. 

Oh yeah, I can see that it can be frustrating sometimes.

Maybe it is a silly question, but it just came to my mind - what's you're favourite sea creature?

PS:  I must spent some time reading your stories since so many here liked them. This maybe a bit difficult since English isn't my first language and sometimes I have problems reading it, but I'm curious now and definitely will try! Wink Smilie

Thank you Val. I've taken a look to the site and read about your job. Interesting.

Regarding to what you say about the boat being a boundary with the world. I understand you well, it's good to have a place where you can be apart and take a breath. I use to travel abroad when I have a long holiday and the 3 lasts years I've been travelling alone. At first it scared me much (as the sea, other places on firm soil can be also terrifying) but actually I find those travels as a break in my daily life and a period to know myself better. I suppose your job, also give you those peaceful moments. Enjoy them!

Quote:
Your work and the Wash sound very soothing and peaceful. I love to anchor in rather shallow water and just listen, breathe deeply and think. On those days I prefer the sky to be slightly overcast with only a hint of golden sun. How wonderful for you.

Your words are always very descriptive, Leelee. I can imagine the day you are describing. We had a bizaar one this time around. While dried out on a sandbank the boat was almost struck by lightening. It was certainly close enough to shake us. Then it hailed so hard we finished up with about 3 inches of ice on the decks. Fortunately I had finished my survey at the time and was back on board waiting for the water to return.

Quote:
That sort of job in Canada , especially on west coast would pay buckets.

Over here in the UK marine biology seems to pay less than the other sciences. I figure it is maybe supply and demand. Because they tend to be interesting jobs, there are always far more applicants than vacancies so they can get away with paying lower.

Quote:
But what of your family, do they not miss you terribly when you don't return home at night? The man who raised me was both a passenger and freight conductor on the CPR railway and he was gone as much as a week at a time. I did not like that .

My wife is the same. She's not happy when I go away. Personally though, I think it keeps a marriage fresh and makes you appreciate each other.

 

Quote:
Greetings, Valedhelgwath. I too have read some of your works, and it's quite good, I must say.

All I know is that you're a council member, but I hadn't seen any posts from you (not sure though), during the time I've been a member of this site. Oh well, I originally registered over five years ago, but then I left and returned over two years ago, if my memory doesn't fail me.

Anyway, I'm Oerath, or Oerath Windsoul, artistically, and pleased to meet ya.

I'm a writer, maybe a bit of a poet and a musician by myself.

Greetings Oerath Windsoul, pleased to meet you. I imagine after so long most of my posts are deeply buried in long-forgotten threads now days. I've not had a lot of time to look through many of the sections yet, but do you have any of your writing on this site? I look forward to having a look.

 

Quote:
Maybe it is a silly question, but it just came to my mind - what's you're favourite sea creature?

I guess I'm similar to a lot of people and like whales. They are rare in my area, and generally only turn up when they are lost. I think that does make them extra special though, when you do catch a glimpse of one. A couple of years ago a pair of northern bottlenose whales completely breached in unison about 60 meters from our patrol boat. They then spent the next hour swimming around us. That was probably the highlight of my career seeing those.

Although whales are the glamorous side of the animal kingdom, I think it is the humble cockle that has the greatest meaning to me. Most of the time I spent fishing was for cockles, and now it is cockles that I seem to concentrate most of my efforts on. I even managed to admit one time on a BBC documentary that I occasionally dream of them. That took some living down afterwards.

 

Quote:
Regarding to what you say about the boat being a boundary with the world. I understand you well, it's good to have a place where you can be apart and take a breath. I use to travel abroad when I have a long holiday and the 3 lasts years I've been travelling alone. At first it scared me much (as the sea, other places on firm soil can be also terrifying) but actually I find those travels as a break in my daily life and a period to know myself better. I suppose your job, also give you those peaceful moments. Enjoy them!

Although we tend to put long hours in on the boat, it is like having a holiday from the office. Most of the fisheries I manage have recently fallen within conservation zones of one sort or another. That makes it very difficult balancing the needs of the fishermen against the conservation objectives. It was difficult enough managing a fishery in a sustainable manner, but throw in the requirements of nature reserves, windfarm construction sites and aggregate dredging areas and it all becomes a whole lot harder. As a consequence, I tend to get a lot of calls and meetings from concerned (occasionally angry) fishermen. It is a breath of fresh air to get away from it all for a week or so on the boat. Unfortunately, due to mobile phones, I still get the occasional call but not so bad.

Where have you travelled to, Elbereth? Going alone must be pretty daunting. I have found being alone is a good way of meeting people, though.

 

When I came home this time, I think I brought an uninvited visitor home with me in my bag. My wife left her jeans on top of my bag overnight and in the morning was bitten by a spider that had crawled into them. I guess that is nothing unusual for most of the people who live anywhere in the world outside of the UK. Here in the UK, however, we seem to have become conditioned to living on an island in which nothing is dangerous. When I caught the spider it turned out to be a false widow. Nothing life-threatening like you get elsewhere in the world, but quite a shock for her to find in her jeans back here in the UK. She was in a lot of pain for about 30 hours. I now need to check my cabin to see if I have a few of them aboard the boat.

@ Valedhelgwath: Heh, more than just a few, since I've been writing for a very long time, and I've also shared most of my works during the past 2+ years on this site. Some journals, some stuff there and there, and since the re-activation of 'Do you have a poem' thread, I've been doing write posts constantly, from page 4 to it's current page 16.

That's a little more about it. Smile Smilie

I guess I'm similar to a lot of people and like whales. They are rare in my area, and generally only turn up when they are lost. I think that does make them extra special though, when you do catch a glimpse of one. A couple of years ago a pair of northern bottlenose whales completely breached in unison about 60 meters from our patrol boat. They then spent the next hour swimming around us. That was probably the highlight of my career seeing those.

Oh yes, whales are amazing. Have you ever heard about a whale named Luna from Canada? Not too long ago I saw a documentary about Luna, what a beautiful, smart animal.

Oh, your poor wife, how painful--outside our front door, three years in a row, was a huge black widow and it was frightening because their venom can kill if allergic. We finally got rid of it, sadly, i hate that but it had to be done for the little one's sake, she would put her hand out to a pit bull if she felt to.

I suppose in some instances being away can indeed keep a marriage fresh; one does not take advantage of the marriage. But some people have a terror , a disorder in which separation is terribly hard to bear. In that case one would have to have some sort of emotional help or resign herself to making baskets at the hospital!

Whales are indeed wondrous, we have a few type on the west coast here, an hour away by plane or nine hours by bus or six by car. Even narwhales . My father owned a restaurant in the province of Alberta where i lived until graduation (Alberta is totally rat free by the way). He loved packing us up the last day of school when his holiday started each year. i would always look with longing at the other children on the street, just playing, living, having their own home to come to each evening.  We would pass through the province I live in now, semi arid with both lakes, world class skiing up on the mountain , and rattle snakes and a few scorpions, plus a single two mile stretch with temperature and humidity like the riviera and where we grow world class grapes and win award after award for the wines. Then on to the coast, cross from the mainland to an island and there to stay and camp . We would go on the ocean in costly rented boats, fish for wild salmon and then back at camp clean and pressure cook them for our restaurant. My father figured out once it cost about ten dollars a tin but people would reserve tables months in advance to taste the fish, it was lovely, I loved the sea, hated the smell of the fish and the ceaseless cry of the gulls, their bickering over fish heads and entrails. And then we would have to go to another island and dig for clams, bring them to the camp, put them into fish aquariums, add cornmeal or whatever and watch them spit out whatever was gross . I never felt much like eating after that. Besides they were Celts and i Jewish so .......... i was rather happy each fall when we came back from their or wherever in the world and just go into the house, have a lovely bath or shower and dress in pretty things and then go into my little room and lay on my little bed and cuddle my doll. Soooo very happy. Do you feel happy to come home Val after your jaunts or is it all the same one way or another?

Oh, your wife.... I have seen a documentary on TV about the spider bites and the one of the widow was awful. I hope your wife is better now and wish you not to have such a visitor at home anymore.

About me? Traveling alone is not so funny as when you go with companions. I have gone to England, France, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, Czech Republic, Netherlands, Belgium and of course Spain and Portugal several places. I wish to travel to Nordic countries such as Danemark, Norway, etc. and also other a bit more far in South America, Africa... too many. The world is too big and I need time and money but I hope I can visit some of them at least once in my life. Well, returning to the subject, I used to travel with my partner or my sister in summer, after a long year of hard work my reward was always a nice travel abroad. However since I have no partner and my sister has other duties, I thought I couldn't stay here waiting for someone to come with me so I decided to go by myself.

The experience is good. I have time to be alone and think about matters of life (what I want to do, which path I should go in order to find happiness, etc.) Those deep thoughts we all have but never find time to dedicate to them. On the other hand, you cannot share your opinion with anyone and sometimes it's very hard. I have spent days in which I spoke only with the reception stuff in the hotel: Good morning, I want the key of my room. Thank you!) Sad! Even so, as everything it has its good and bad things.

Elbereth, you have a sensitive nature and both modes of travel have afforded you great experiences. Have you thought of taking a tour, a good one , that way in whatever country you are in you at least have a sort of family to talk to each day, especially in the evening , the end of the day over a nice meal. That for me has been lovely some of the time.

Just about every time I see those crab-fisherman documentary-series on Discovery it think: "sigh, I wish I was watching the one with Val instead, that would actually be interesting. I should see if I find it somewhere. Wonder what it's called?" Do I ever remember to actually ask? Nope! Ha Ha Ha Smilie 

Leelee, that's the next step. This summer I have booked a tour for 12 days during my 3-week-travel in New Zealand. So I will have time to be alone and think about many things-changes I am organizing (actually I am thinking of quitting my job and go abroad for working and living, hard decision but very good experience I suppose); I will have also time to know people and even make new friends during the tour. It will be funny and new for me.

Anyway, thanks a lot for your suggestion.

My honor Elbereth, I hope you have the most wonderful time. Always look in Trip Advisor to find out how others found dealing with any tour company you are interested in , that way you won't be in for any depressing or nasty surprises. But the people are always so interesting, it is almost like living in an Agatha Christie novel.

Yes, Leelee. In this case I have some suggestions and I got some of them from here. I have chatted once with Fornad and he suggested me a tour I will try if I have time. I am always listening to any opinion, sometimes someone else's idea can be a great help.

By the way, Fornad: kind regards, I would like to have news from you dear.

Leelee, you have such a way with words - you take your readers there. Your description of camping on the island, catching fish and clams - I was there myself for a moment. I love the sound of gulls, though. They remind me so much of the sea, although now days you can find more of them around a landfill site than at sea. I know what you mean about getting back home though, into a house. I enjoy being away at sea for a few days at a time, but it is good to get home again, to have a steaming hot shower that doesn't run cold halfway through washing my hair, a comfortable sofa to sprawl out on when watching TV, carpets, plenty of hot water to wash the dishes in, clean dry clothes, my bed, the internet, my family etc etc. It was particularly nice to get home yesterday. I have only been doing day trips, mainly running out to sea in a Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) looking out for bad guys. It was pretty rough yesterday though, and I spent the best part of five hours having every wave break over us. At one point we must have gone for half an hour during which none of us could see anything due to the spray in our faces. We were just catching occasional glimpses of where we needed to be heading, while trying to hold on as the waves flung us about. I spent the last hour heading home just thinking about having a hot shower and getting the salt water out of my eyes and mouth. When I got home I just let the fresh water pour onto my face - bliss.

You have traveled a lot Elbereth. Certainly far more than myself. I tend to spend a lot of time in the English Lake District or occasionally in Scotland. Generally I go with family or friends, but I did go to the Lakes one year on my own. I wasn't sure how I would get on, camping alone, but it was really good. Certainly met more people than if I had gone with someone else.

Quote:
Just about every time I see those crab-fisherman documentary-series on Discovery it think: "sigh, I wish I was watching the one with Val instead, that would actually be interesting. I should see if I find it somewhere. Wonder what it's called?" Do I ever remember to actually ask? Nope!

It is called "Working the Sea". There is a link to a description of it at http://www.bbc.co.uk/lincolnshire/content/articles/2006/08/04/working_sea_feature.shtml but I have never found the actual program online. I do have a few copies burned on DVD if you wanted me to send you one though. Those crab fishermen on the Deadliest Catch are awesome. If I was younger and didn't have a family, I'd probably try to have a season aboard one of those boats. Be a real test of character. I have a lot of respect for those guys.

How kind of you Val, but i am a writer by trade, so no kudos to me. Many to all of you though, i have not been on a site before that has such a singular number of well read and very articulate folk .

Val, consider taking some good snaps of where you travel on the salty sea and write a small book on it .The sea calls many and yet there are numerous people on this earth who will never have  a chance to go out into the elements on a chill black morning, crisp air into the lungs, the air of adventure quivering about you . They shall never taste the salt tang of the air as the craft plunges through tons of living water , or know what it is to feel the desperate call of sleep when the sun is beguiling and the air is intoxicating and the gentle lap of sea water caresses the steady seasoned craft. But with a small picture filled book and a simple narrative and your deep feelings about what you do and where you go, well the rest of us can sigh with contentment after putting the book down, knowing we went along with you and will never be quite the same.