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Thread: Kor-Tirion

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I moved Morambar's post of Saturday 20th May 2006 (10:07pm) in Trivia: Barad-dur to this thread.
Quote:
Is Kor-Tirion (or just Tirion in the Silm) considered not to be in Valinor? I know that's the position in HoME because both the Exiles and Eriol/Aelfwine are allowed to reside/abide there (but NEITHER is welcome in Valinor itself.) That's fine for questions like these, but begs the additional question of just WHERE (Kor-)Tirion is? Middle-earth Way, Way WAY West? And what about Alqualonde? Didn't the Teleri live there, not just use it as a dock?
Alqualonde was the city and port of the Teleri located north of the Calacirya on the coast of Aman when they originally came to Aman.
Kortirion was the name of the great tower that Ingil, son of Inwë built in the center of the island of Tol Eressëa, located off the coast of Aman. This was in memory of Tirion, when that city became off-limits to them. A city grew up around Kortirion and became known by that name.
Tirion earlier named Kôr, was the City of the Eldor built on the hill of Túna, near the great ravine in the Pelóri, the Calacirya.
Valmar (Valimar) was the city of the Valar built in the center of the Plain of Valinor, which was inland from the coast on the continent of Aman.

I think the problem may be that we often use Valinor, the Land of the Valar, instead of Aman when we mean the Land in the West, but of course I'm probably wrong.
I think technically only Valmar is located in Valinor, because Valinor is all land west of the Pelori-mountains. Hence Tirion lays just on the border of Valinor and Alqualondë outside of it.

But the aformentioned cities are all part of Eldamar (Elvenhome), which refers to all parts of Aman where there are Eldar.

Valinor only refers to the part of Aman that was hallowed by the Valar; Avathar in the south and Araman in the north are not part of Valinor.
Works for me. I confess to conceiving of Aman and Valinor as synonymous. Thanks for the clarification.
Virumor's explanation of the geographical areas is much clearer than mine. Happy Elf Smilie
Quote:
Kortirion was the name of the great tower that Ingil, son of Inwë built in the center of the island of Tol Eressëa, located off the coast of Aman. This was in memory of Tirion, when that city became off-limits to them. A city grew up around Kortirion and became known by that name.


But who is this Ingil?

In the external history (not necessarily exhaustive on the name changes here) Ingil became Ingwil who became Ingwiel who became Ingwion, who is the son of Ingwe (I woud say Ingwion means 'son of Ingwe' as well).

And Inwe became Ingwe, the Lord of the Vanyar.
Quote:
But who is this Ingil?

In the external history (not necessarily exhaustive on the name changes here) Ingil became Ingwil who became Ingwiel who became Ingwion, who is the son of Ingwe (I woud say Ingwion means 'son of Ingwe' as well).

And Inwe became Ingwe, the Lord of the Vanyar.

Where does Imin fit into all this?
My point with the previous post was more about 'reviving' old text. I think the statement above that Ingil built this tower comes from Karen Fonstad's Atlas (it's in there in any case). But if we look at what is really being stated there, and look at just who Ingil was, we are looking at early ideas that don't necessarily survive as true Middle-earth history or legend.
For some reason the word Kor-Tirion reminds me greatly of Gondolin...
I must be mistaken Smile Smilie
That's interesting Arath. Gondolin was made in memory of Tirion anyway, and it was built upon an 'island-hill'.

In the late 1930s the base KOR- meant round, and kôr was a: 'round hill upon which Túna was built'. This connection to roundness survived into The Lord of the Rings, noting cormacolindor 'Ringbearers' (*corma being a ring).