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Ok, something odd that no one probably even cares about...but...I was just looking at a map of ME, and I noticed that Fangorn is on the wrong side of the Mountains. Maybe it is far enough fromt he sea for this not to be an issue, but the way it appears, Fangorn is located in the rainshadow of the Misty Mountains. That should all be near-desert conditions. If you go up to Washington State, and compare the eastern side of the Cascades (near the sea) to the western side (on the other side) you can se a marked difference between the two halves. I'm probably completely off, but my map here has no scale, so I'm not really sure how far from the coast they are...but if they are as close as I think, Fangorn is kept alive by something other than the rain, or is a very dry sort of forest...
The Misty Mountains is not the Himalayas.

There's mountains on both sides of the Alps, or the Ural, for instance. Furthermore Fangorn is not so far off from the sea to the south. So I can't see the problem, especially since I am sure JRRT didn't take any of this geographical hoopnanny into account when writing his works.
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Fangorn is kept alive by something other than the rain, or is a very dry sort of forest...

You heard of Ents?

Sorry for the blatent sarcasm, but I'd have thought it very simple as the trees of Middle-Earth all had "minds" of their own (not like our boring trees) and therefore could grow where they pleased, along with help of Ents, maybe an Entwife before they got lost....
And there were many streams flowing throught there right? The big one, Entwash or something, and I would imagine many trickling rivulets too.
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Fangorn is kept alive by something other than the rain, or is a very dry sort of forest...

Fangorn didn't keep the forest alive, he kept the forest together. Indeed, without him around all trees would've just walked off!
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If you go up to Washington State, and compare the eastern side of the Cascades (near the sea) to the western side (on the other side) you can se a marked difference between the two halves.

Just a point of order: It is the western side of Washington State (where I make my home) that is near the ocean; the eastern side (where I was raised) has some near desert conditions being in the rain-shadow of the Cascade Mountain Range.

The Cascade Mountains located farther east from me, split the State of Washington into its eastern and western halves. To my west are the coastal Olympic Mountains located on the Olympic Peninsula, and on their western side is a rain forest where they get 120 inches per year.

To my northwest is a town named Squim that lies in the rain-shadow of those Olympic Mountains and it has an annual rainfall of only 12 inches, which is comparable to near arid condition of Eastern Washington. Surrounding Squim are areas where thirty-six inches is the yearly norm and where I live out of that shadow we have an annual norm of 53 inches (last year we had a record of 81 inches glub-glub).

My rainfall comes from the southwest, just as does that of Fangorn's, which comes from the sea through the Gap of Rohan between the Misty and the White Mountains. Teacher Smilie
Sorry but i don't agree with what you were trying to say. There is always quite a bit a rainfall near any place associated with mountains or rising of altitude because when clouds absorb a lot of moisture and are too heavy to 'climb' over a mountain or higher altitudes, they are forced to drop some of their load. Hence the reason why the Northern Westcoast is known for it's rain. According to the map Fangorn forest is situated beside the Misty Mountains, so that can be your answer for the watering of that forest.

Secondly Fangorn forest is in Middle Earth, not the same place we live in.

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Fangorn is located in the rainshadow of the Misty Mountains. That should all be near-desert conditions.

Third off, why should it be all desert conditions? I live in British Columbia, Canada, and what seperates British Columbia from Alberta are the Rocky Mountains. True there isn't near as much forest in Alberta, when compared to BC, but you could never call Alberta or the provinces east of Alberta, 'dester conditions'. They call them the praries because of the flat land, which is quite dry in the summer, but in the winter it's a white out. Nothing close to desert conditions though.
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Just a point of order: It is the western side of Washington State (where I make my home) that is near the ocean; the eastern side (where I was raised) has some near desert conditions being in the rain-shadow of the Cascade Mountain Range.

eherm...yes. Thanks for pointing that out. I wrote this at two in the morning, so I hope that counts for something... Got The Blues Smilie I also lived in Washington for nearly six years (the longest I've lived anywhere, actually) so, I should have caught that...but oh well.
I see what you're saying about the rain coming up through the Gap. It makes sense.
Also, now that I'm looking at the map again, the Entwash flows through the southern end and the Limlight through the northern tip of the forest. As well as the fact you cannot ever discount the Ents!
Thanks for all the replies to a rather silly question!