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Tar-Aldarion originally posted

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What do people do in the Halls of Mandos? Do they live a normal life there, or are they just "spirits"? (passive observers seeing everything going on)


Valedhelgwath replied

In a dim silence, the spirits of the dead just sit and think. After a time (the time depending how good they were in life) the elves are released to live in Aman, while those of Men pass west out of Arda to await the Second Great Music (Heaven).

It doesn't really give a time scale except to say that Finrod Felagund now walks beneath the trees with his father, whereas Feanor will not be released for a very long time.

Is that a direct quote, Val? Where is that located?

I was just recently wondering about the Halls of Mandos, myself. I wandered if the souls of the dead mixed or if they were kept secluded. Could Elves, Dwarves and Men interect there? Do dwarves even go there? For that mattter, do Hobbits go there when they die?

So many questions about the end... Just like in real life.
It wasn't actually a quote as such, Glorfinel, but something close to what I once read.

From Sil p224
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But Luthien came to the Halls of Mandos, where are the appointed places of the Eldalie, beyond the mansions of the West upon the confines of the world. There those that wait sit in the shadow of their thought.


About Dwarves...From Sil p51
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For they say that Aule the Maker, whom they call Mahal, cares for them, and gathers them to Mandos in halls set apart; and that he declared to their Fathers of old that Iluvatar will hallow them and give them a place among the Children in the End. Then their part shall be to serve Aule and to aid him in the remaking of Arda after the Last Battle.


Part of Mandos's Doom of the Noldor predicted...From Sil p103
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...and your houseless spirits shall come then to Mandos. There long shall you abide and yearn for your bodies, and find little pity though all whom you have slain should entreat for you.


About Men...From the Sil p124
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What may befall their spirits after death the Elves know not. Some say that they too go to the halls of Mandos; but their place of waiting there is not that of the Elves, and Mandos under Iluvatar alone save Manwe knows whither they go after the time of recollection in those silent halls beside the Outer Sea.


Of Feanor from Sil p127
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...and his likeness has never again appeared in Arda, neither has his spirit left the halls of Mandos.


Of Saeros after his accidental death after tormenting Turin...from UT p82
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So he ended his life in Doriath; and long would Mandos hold him.


From Robert Foster's Complete Guide to Middle Earth p205
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Here come the spirits of Men and Elves (and perhaps Dwarves) after their deaths, and in the dim silence they sit and think. The spirits of Elves are released from the Houses after a time and are free to live in Aman, but after their time of Awaiting, the spirits of Men pass west out of Arda. If the Dwarves do indeed come to the Houses, they remain there until the End.
Those were interesting quotes Val. I thought of the Halls of Mandos as somewhere between the Elysian fields of Greek mythology and Asgard of Norse mythology. There seems to be the same sense of doom as in Asgard, and yet Elves can walk among trees like in the Elysian fields.
I've always seen them as a place where spirits go, not to be judged or to permenantly stay, but to contemplate their deeds in life. Alone, in silence and dimness, the spirit perhaps contemplates for centuries what they maybe took a year to do in life, studying mistakes and repercussions of their actions on those around them.

I see it has the place where the spirit discovers the potential it could have achieved in life (not skillwise like making silmarils etc) and once content with itself, it can move on, either back to Arda (Elves), or to Iluvatar's side to await the Second Great Music (Men).
Good. Do they eat or drink there?
Glorfinel Ithink that the souls dont mix int halls but arefloating about in different parts of the hall
I think it certain that men go to the halls of Mandos otherwise Luthien wouldn't have had much look pleading for Beren.
Since they are without bodies, I don't think they would eat or drink, or do anything for that matter, apart from think about their past.
im not positive about this and its only a therory. But in the appendices of RoTK it tells that the Dwarves believe that their kings have been reborn various times ie: Durin II,III,IV.....so maybe they share a fate similar to the elves...please correct me if this is completely wrong! Tongue Smilie
I've studied a lot the Halls of Mandos myself, it is really the place where the spirits of the death go when they die. In the case of the Elves (Noldor and Sindar) they stay there in trapped it their thoughts untill they have, in a way, payed for what they have done in their life, all elves that die wish they never did, because that wasn't the destiny Iluvatar prepared for them, they were suposed to live for ever. They wish to get their bodies back, but they can't. After they have been a long time in the halls of Mandos they are set free into Aman, but they still miss their body (they don't miss it they way they did before, but they still do).
In the case of men, they stay there a while, but they don't miss their bodies, then they leave Arda.
For the Dwarves, they are retained in different hall than the Elves and Men, because Aulë wanted it this way, when their time has come to leave Mandos they go to Aulë and help him prepare to remake Arda, because it is said that in the end of days it will take its original form.
Finding what happens to Hobbits was really hard, some say that they come from dwarves (that is the theory I support), the Albos (one of the hobbits' races) used to live near the lonely mountain, and were very simmilar in stature to a Dwarf, so, when they die they go to the halls of Mandos and stay with the Dwarves but they won't hel Aulë rebuilt Arda. This is just a theory that I found is the best one I got, if someone has any better one, please tell me.
And they don't eat or drink.

[Edited on 20/1/2003 by Namo]
I've never heared of it before, but it think you got it wrong, when Elves and Dwarves leave Mandos they don't get their bodies back, so they are no reborned. And the Dwarves do share a similar fate with the Elves, but I don't think they miss their body.
Ok thanks for clearing that up Namo, maybe it was that the Dwarves that bore the name of Durin were as great as their predecessor and thats why they were named as such.
I belive that is why.
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im not positive about this and its only a therory. But in the appendices of RoTK it tells that the Dwarves believe that their kings have been reborn various times ie: Durin II,III,IV.....so maybe they share a fate similar to the elves...please correct me if this is completely wrong
The first father of Durin's line lived such a long time that he became known as Durin the Deathless. His line was never broken and the first five heirs to this line were so similar to their forefathers, they too were named Durin. The Dwarves had many beliefs, one of them being that each new Durin was in fact the Deathless returned.

They also believed that Durin VII would be the last king of their people but when DurinVI was killed by the Balrog they began naming their kings with different names. I think in reality the reincarnation of Durin the Deathless was just wishful thinking on the part of the Dwarves.
But that belived was really dismissed after Durin VI was killed by the Balrog. And by the way, talking about the Dwarves, does anyone know where the other Dwarves tribes have their city?
I'm not sure, but I don't think the Dwarves of Belegost and Nogrod were of Durin's folk. Azaghal was the Dwarven king of Belegost during the First Age when one of the Durins would have been king in Khazad-dum. If they were of the same people, Azaghal would have been a lord rather than a king of his people.
I belive they were not, maybe they were from another of the tribes of the first seven Dwarves, but if Durin was one of these seven, and the lords of Nogrod and Belegosts were another (maybe) where are the other and their tribes?
I think that there were only the 3 Dwarven cities....but i have a question about Elves for Namo, you said after they are permitted to leave Mandos they go to Valinor but still miss their bodies. Does this mean that they are only spirts or do they get new bodies. And what about Glorfindel(the Rivendell one from FoTR not the one of Gondolin) was he a reincarnation or just named after the first?
They miss their bodies because they are spirits. In a part of the Noldors doom (I don't know it in english) says that they'll miss their body and find no mercy (or just a bit), they don't get their bodies back.
And in response to the other question about Glorfindel, I can't really assure anything, but I don't think that Mandos let Glorfindel go back to Middle Earth, even if he was an important elf, there were many others that did things much more important than him (Ex: The brave warlord Fingolfin) and should have been reencarnated. So I belive that the Glorfindel from Rivendel was named after the first one.
I dont think thats the same Glorfindel as he would be stranded in the Undying lands
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And what about Glorfindel(the Rivendell one from FoTR not the one of Gondolin) was he a reincarnation or just named after the first?
I read an essay about the Glorfindel subject on another site once, but cannot remember where. According to their research (and the essay was well researched with several references to Tolkien's work), Tolkien had originally intended the two Glorfindels to be the same elf. He had written some parts to fit this scenario but later he had difficulty fitting other facts and dates around this so changed his mind. He then decided the two Glorfindel's would be separate people and so wrote it as such.

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Does this mean that they are only spirts or do they get new bodies.
There seems to be two schools of thought on this one. Some people believe once they are released from Mandos they get their bodies back. Others, including myself, are of the opinion they don't.

Remaining a spirit in Valinor, however, would be different to being a ghost in our own world. The Elves and spirits of Valinor would be much more attuned to each other than we are. Finrod might well walk with his father beneath the trees, tell each other tales etc, but in my opinion, Finrod is still a spirit lacking his body.
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And by the way, talking about the Dwarves, does anyone know where the other Dwarves tribes have their city?
The Dwarven mansions in the Grey mountains, Iron Hills and Erebor are all populated by Durin's folk. Apart from them, with the exception of those in the Blue mountains who may have been a different family, few dwarves are mentioned. Middle Earth is far bigger than the bit LotR concentrates on, however. The other Dwarven fathers may have awoken far to the East or the South and founded their kingdoms in areas uncovered by the books.

Saying this, the Petty Dwarf, Mim, told Turin that his people had been persecuted by elves and other dwarves, and that they had been the first to enter Beleriand. The question arises of what were the Petty Dwarves? Were they an entirely separate race from dwarves, were they dwarves, but of a different family, or were they just a group of dwarves that had somehow been mutated or stunted?

If the second answer is the case, Mim might well have been the last member of one of the seven Dwarven families.
I totally agrre with you val in the thing that the elves don't get their body back after they leave Mandos. Remember the Noldor's doom, Mandos clearly says that they'll miss their body, but find no mercy. For me this "No mercy" thing means they will never get their bodies back. I find a bit strange the thing about Finrod walking with his father under the trees (I know it's true), but if the elves really miss their body they wouldn't want to see other elves with body, maybe they fill jealous, but remember in what case Finrod died, he died by keeping a promise, so maybe he fills relieved. (The last thing is just a thought though)
Although the Doom of the Noldor affected all of the Noldor who returned to Middle Earth, while speaking parts of the Doom Mandos specifically mentioned the House of Feanor (who had swore the Oath) and those that had been part of the Kinslaying. I think it is to these elves specifically that he pronounces the grim warning of, "little pity though all whom ye have slain should entreat for you."

What makes me feel this is the case is a later sentence in the same chapter,

From Of the Flight of the Noldor - Silmarillion
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....and all of Fingolfin's folk went forward still, feeling the constraint of their kinship and the will of Feanor, and fearing to face the doom of the Valar, since not all of them had been guiltless of the Kinslaying at Alqualonde.
To me, this means it is only those who were guilty of the Kinslaying would recieve the "heavy hand" of Mandos, though any who did not return immediately and seek pardon would be banished.

If you remember, it was Feanor's people who took part in the Kinslaying, though some of Fingolfin's who arrived shortly after found themselves being pushed forward by the crowds behind into the fighting. Most of these coming by surprise into this fight did not know that Feanor had instigated this battle and so joined in believing the Teleri to be the aggressors.

More importantly, Finarfin's people (eg. Finrod, Galadriel etc) played no part in this battle at all and so would be free from this part of the doom.
So there is a distinction between houses that I was not quite sure about, becaus at the begining of the doom it says that over Fëanor house the anger of the Valar will fall from the East to the West and to all which choose to follow him will fall the same way. And don't forget that at last the Noldors were forgiven (some of them) and the first part of the doom was forgotten, bacause it said that the Valar will never let them into Valinor again, and later all the elves in Middle Earth were leaving to the undiying lands. And also as the Noldor's blood mixed with the Sindar's (who hadn't recieved the doom) that may also be another reason for them to be forgiven, also as Finarfin's house. And Mandos said that the Noldor had salyed their relatives with no reazon. He said relatives, and the only Noldor that were related to the Teleri were the ones in Finarfin's house. So here is the big question, was Finarfin's house forgiven from the part of missing their bodies or never were counted for that part of the doom?
I think the "yearn for your bodies," was kind of like a curse that Mandos placed on these elves. In his halls they are supposed to sit and think, and contemplate on their lives. An elf that has led a good life, and has few regrets, may have good thoughts in Mandos's halls, wereas one that has led a bad life may have many regrets, and be made to review those regrets a lot. Because their time in the Halls is torment to them, they may well miss their bodies, wishing they were alive still.

In answer to your question about Finarfin's house, I don't believe they were counted in that part of the doom. Those who left for Middle Earth were still banished because they were disobeying the Valar, but that was their only punishment. The length of time they spent in the Halls would still depend on how good/bad a life they had led, but it would not be influenced by the Curse of Mandos.

They would still be without their bodies, which in itself must be very strange and take some getting used to, but I think it would be something they'd become accostomed to during their time in the halls. Once released back to Valinor they would be able to live among the living elves, listening to songs and tales, walking through the woods etc, but would perhaps miss some of the joys of having a body.
But if Finarfin's house was excused from that part of the doom (and they were the only Noldor that were related to the Teleri) Why did Mandos said that they've unjustly spilled their relatives' blood?
It sort of states in the Silmarillion that MIm and his people were exiled by the rest of the dwarves for some crime they commited. This would most likely be the reason they were stunted in groth because they were pushed out and didn't have the resources, much like the same reason the people of rich family's will suddenly have large offspring even though they aren't particularily big them selves. If they were laking in food there growth would be stunted.
Hi, Guys:

I'm a first-time poster but, as a big fan of Glorfindel, I've done some research on him and the conclusion seems to be that Tolkien's final decision was that Glorfindel of Gondolin and Glorfindel of Rivendell are one and the same. (Stated in Volume 12 of the History).

The excerpts below are from various sources derived from TheOneRing.Net, specifically the Green Books section and Q&A. The answers come with references from the books:
~~~~~~~~~

In the tale Of the Beginning of Days in the published Silmarillion, we are told (of the Elves) that "dying they are gathered to the halls of Mandos in Valinor, whence they may in time return." It is notable that the Halls of Mandos are also called the "Halls of Waiting" throughout the mythology. In the essay on the Laws and Customs Among the Eldar (late 1950s, found in History of Middle-earth Volume X, "Morgoth's Ring"), he elaborated on this point, making the time of Waiting a purgatory and healing period for the 'fea' (spirit) in which "they were corrected, instructed, strengthened, or comforted, according to their needs or deserts. If they would consent to this." At this time, he felt that the spirits released from Mandos were re-incarnated as newborn Elvish infants. Later, as he considered the matter of Glorfindel's return (see "The Peoples of Middle-earth," History of Middle-earth Volume XII), he came to the conclusion that the released souls were clothed in new adult bodies based on their memory of their earlier incarnate life.

~~~~

In a much later essay, ("Peoples of Middle-earth") specifically concerning Glorfindel, he expands on this:
It was ... the duty of the Valar, by command of the One, to restore [Elves] to incarnate life, if they desired it. But this ‘restoration’ could be delayed *[Or in the gravest cases (such as that of Fëanor) withheld and referred to the One] by Manwë, if the fea while alive had done evil deeds and refused to repent of them, or still harboured any malice against any other person among the living....
He goes on to describe Glorfindel's history and sacrifice, and his short stay in the Halls of Waiting. Then:
For long years he remained in Valinor, in reunion with the Eldar ... and in the companionship of the Maiar. To these he had now become almost an equal, for though he was an incarnate .... his spiritual power had been greatly enhanced by his self-sacrifice.

~~~~~~~

Q: So how is Glorfindel an Elf-Lord? The Glorfindel that crossed over with the Noldor in Silmarillion fell in battle with a Balrog while escaping Gondolin. And the Noldor are the only elves who crossed over, weren't they? The only thing I can think of is the possibility that Glorfindel was a descendant of Thingol, who of course made the initial trip to Valimar and then didn't make it back the second time around. Also, since Thingol married well (to say the least), all of his descendants could be considered Elf-Lords, I guess. But is there anything in writing that supports the idea of Glorfindel being a descendant of Thingol?

A: This questions ties into the whole problem of whether the Glorfindel of The Silmarillion, who was killed in a fight with a Balrog in Gondolin, is the same Glorfindel as is found in The Lord of the Rings. Tolkien himself considered this, and wrote a few fascinating short essays, which are printed in The Peoples of Middle-earth, pp. 377-82. I recommend that anyone interested in this very curious matter seek them out.
In one of these pieces Tolkien himself interprets a small passage in The Fellowship of the Ring (from p. 235) as pertaining to Glorfindel (when the passage itself doesn’t necessarily have to refer to him). Tolkien writes that Glorfindel "is said to have been one of the ‘lords of the Eldar from beyond the furthest seas … who have dwelt in the Blessed Realm.’." [p. 379 of The Peoples of Middle-earth; the ellipses are Tolkien’s] This would rule out Glorfindel being Sindarin (and thereby ruling out the possibility that he is a descendant of Thingol).
Though it remains problematical, one nearly has to come to the conclusion that the Glorfindel of The Silmarillion, slain in the Fall of Gondolin, was indeed reborn in Aman and allowed to return to Middle-earth, where he had a role to play in the War of the Ring, as is narrated in The Lord of the Rings.

~~~~~

Hope this was of interest.

Elyssia
Hello Elyssia and welcome to Planet Tolkien, I found really interesting what you posted, and worthy of discussion. If you take a look at Robert Foster's complete guide of middle earth, you'll see he actually considers Glorfindel from Gondolin and Glorfindel from Rivendel as different characters, saying from both of them that they are Eldar lords, and also that probably they belong to Finarfin's house, we know that Finarfin was married to the daughter of Olwë, Earwën, from the Teleri. So his house was, in a way, related to the house of Thingol. May be that is why it is said of Glorfindel to be a desendant of Thingol, and an Eldar lord. If you read the previous posts, where it says that Tolkien originaly wanted Glorfindel from Gondolin and Glorfindel from Rivendel to be the same elf. At last he decided for them to be different elves. And in response to what you said about the reencarnation, I dont't really think it hapened, because if this was really possible, why didn't any other elf returned to middle earth? Maybe it was a belief, like the one of Durin, a belief that was never true. But in the other hand, we do have the posibility of the eles that ended their time in Mandos, got their bodies back and stayed in Aman, now, whe the elves are reencarnated, who decides were are they going to be born?
I guess Val has something interesting to say about you post Elyssia. By the way, great post Wink Smilie
It's a good point but remember that the HOME is mainly conjecture by Christopher Tolkien, who quite alot of the time doesn't konw what he's talking about and admits this.
Nice post Elyssia, and a big welcome to Planet Tolkien.

In my earlier post I mentioned that Tolkien had originally intended the two Glorfindels to be the same person but had later changed his mind. This was based on a long essay I once read on the subject and it did quote several passages from various HOME books.

The problem with this series of books is that because they were printed later, it is easy to assume what is written in them was Tolkien's final ideas. Unfortunately, this is not the case. They are based on Tolkien's earlier drafts and scribblings, many of which changed dramatically by the time he was happy enough with the final product.

This leaves researchers with the problem of sorting contrasting information into a chronological order of when it was written. Something written early in his career might carry less weight than something written later, when he has gone over it a few times and ironed out any problems.

I believe in the HOME series you will find evidence for the Glorfindels being both the same and different, just as in UT you will find several contrasting stories about Celeborn and Galadriel (although in this later case, the latest writing clashes with what had already been published in LotR, in that Amroth was said to be Galadriel's son)

I think the biggest argument to say the two of them were not the same is that if one elf can come back to Middle Earth after being slain, why do we not see this happening more often? Glorfindel may have earned an early release for his heroics against the balrog, but many other elves died bravely too without returning.

The name Glorfindel means Golden hair. This name might be as common among the House of Finarfin as John Smith is now days.
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This name might be as common among the House of Finarfin as John Smith is now days.


Yeh or Wozname from down the pub! Tongue Smilie
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But if Finarfin's house was excused from that part of the doom (and they were the only Noldor that were related to the Teleri) Why did Mandos said that they've unjustly spilled their relatives' blood?
Mandos uses the term Kindred rather than relative, Namo. I think in this he is refering to all elves as being one kindred, and that it was a great crime for any elf to kill another elf whether they were related or not.
I would just like to add that Tolkien's own writing should take precedence over Foster's. I have found other errors in his Guide to Middle Earth.

I am inclined to believe there is only one Glorfindel.
Mhh, that's new for me Val, as in spanish the word that Mandos uses is "parientes", and this words stands for relatives and for kindred, now that I read the doom and take that word as kindred it makes sense... I guess that it was just a language miss understood.
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I've never heared of it before, but it think you got it wrong, when Elves and Dwarves leave Mandos they don't get their bodies back, so they are no reborned. And the Dwarves do share a similar fate with the Elves, but I don't think they miss their body.


I got this text from www.tolkien.cro.net
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Yes. In addition to a number of general statements to this effect at least two Elves are specifically said to have been "re-embodied" after being slain: Finrod Felagund and Glorfindel.
("Re-embodied" is used rather than "reincarnated" because in the case of Elves (unlike what's usually meant in a human context) the spirit was reborn in a body resembling the original and furthermore all its former memories would be substantially intact).


I do not know about itbeing the truth but it seems likely to be so.....but they will haveto be in the Halls of Mandos first before they are re-embodied Smoke Smilie
From one of my earlier posts in this thread.
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There seems to be two schools of thought on this one. Some people believe once they are released from Mandos they get their bodies back. Others, including myself, are of the opinion they don't.
Well after years of believing elven spirits leaving the Halls of Mandos did not get their bodies back, I have now read something today that has turned my previous view upside down. First, however, I'd like to apologise to Elyssia for this reply that I made on 25/1/03 to one of his posts.
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The problem with this series of books is that because they were printed later, it is easy to assume what is written in them was Tolkien's final ideas. Unfortunately, this is not the case. They are based on Tolkien's earlier drafts and scribblings, many of which changed dramatically by the time he was happy enough with the final product.

This leaves researchers with the problem of sorting contrasting information into a chronological order of when it was written. Something written early in his career might carry less weight than something written later, when he has gone over it a few times and ironed out any problems.

My basis for the above argument was that I tend to treat the Silmarillion as a final draft, and the HOME series as early scribblings of Tolkien as his story evolved. The Silmarillion, however, was an edited version of Tolkien's notes compiled by his son. There are many bits in HOME that have been superceeded by other notes that Tolkien wrote, but equally, there are also bits giving a lot of information omitted from the Silmarillion, but which are the most up to date versions of what JRR wrote.

Okay, having said all that, the piece I read today which prompted all this, is in a section of Morgoth's Ring, close to the piece Ellyssia had quoted from. In this piece it is describing the grief Finwe was feeling over the death of Miriel, and the wish to remarry. He is told that the Eldar may only take one spouse and that marriage shall endure until the end of Arda. It does not take into account Death, however, and Manwe decrees that should one partner go to the Halls of Mandos, the other shall be allowed to remarry, but only if the one in the Halls of Mandos agrees to remain in the Halls until the end of Arda.

From Morgoth's Ring
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This doom is therefore now made, by the right of lawgiving that Iluvatar committed to Manwe: that if the spirit of a spouse, husband or wife, forsaking the body, shall for any cause pass into the keeping of Mandos, then the living shall br permitted to take another spouse. But this can only be, if the former union be dissolved forever. Therefore the one that is in the keeping of Mandos must remain until the end of Arda, and shall not awake again or take bodily form.
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It is said that Miriel answered Mandos saying: "I came hither to escape my body, and I do not desire ever to return to it"


This chapter goes on to describe how a spirit reborn, enters the body of a new born child and relives a second childhood before regaining the memories of its past life. Only in cases where the body had died without much injury could the spirit re-enter the same body. It also describes how the time of Waiting in the Halls of Mandos did not entirely depend on the judgement of the Valar either. Many spirits wished to linger longer in the Halls than Mandos had decreed for them, and these were allowed to do so. None were reborn unwillingly.

It also states that the spirits could take no futher part in the doing of Arda unless they were reborn, nor could they converse with the spirits of the living unless they were reborn.

As I've found nothing by Tolkien refuting what he had written here, it is now clear to me that elven spirits can be reborn into physical bodies after all.
So maybe after Glorfindel of Gondolin and the Balrog fell to their deaths, and Glorfindel's body had been rescued by Thorondor the Chief Eagle and had been buried, then sometime later Glorfindel may have been resurrected back into his body as a baby Elf.
I'm still trying to find Tolkien's final decision on that one Grondy. In some places, generally his earlier work, the two Glorfindels were meant to be the same spirit. In other places, however, Tolkien appears to have changed his mind (after certain hurdles cannot easily be explained) and he has them as two separate spirits. It's a case of finding all the relevent sections, and deciding which were written last.
I am glad we took up this discussion again....the Halls of Mandos has been collecting dust on the shelf for too long!!Tongue Smilie
I was wondering how the Glorfindel of FOTR was around Valinor if the previous one was around without confusion.
I'm sorry i don't get you, do you mean how was he able to withstand the fear of the Nazgul?

If you do it was because he had seen the Light of the Valar and the trees and saw the true great beings, therefore he was not affraid of some pale image of essentially dead evil men!
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I was just recently wondering about the Halls of Mandos, myself. I wandered if the souls of the dead mixed or if they were kept secluded. Could Elves, Dwarves and Men interect there?
In addition to the earlier answer I gave to this question, I have also found a piece in Morgoth's Ring.
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The re-born report that in Mandos there are many elves, and among them the Alamanyar, but that there is in the Halls of Waiting little mingling or communing of kind with kind, or indeed of any one fea with another. For the houseless fea is solitary by nature, and turns only towards those with whom, maybe, it formed strong bonds of love in life.
Could you explain that a little more Val? I didn´t get that.....:P
This was from speculation anyway but my question about Glorfindel was this: at any point, were there two Glorfindels at the same time? The Glorfindel of Gondolin fell before the end of the First Age and the second Glorfindel was around during the Second Age against the power of Angmar. Was the second Glorfindel also around Valinor the same time as the first Glorfindel? That's the only thing i want to know.
I assume the Two Glorfindels weren't contemporaries. Had they been, we wouldn't have any confusion over whether the second was a reincarnation of the first, as we are not talking about a time machine here, but a possible rebirth after spending a period of time in the Halls of Mandos. If there was a textual record showing they were contempories then reincarnation from one to the other was impossible.

Quote:
Could you explain that a little more Val? I didn´t get that.....:
Yes Aule. At the start of the thread Tar-Aldarien and Glorfinel asked what souls/spirits did in the Halls of Mandos, whether they mixed with each other or the other races etc.

The quote I used from Morgoth's Ring basically tells us that the spirits tend not to mingle in the Halls as they are mainly solitary. If they do interact, it is with those they loved in life.
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