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Thread: ABOUT QUEEN SUSAN

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For the first time I actually read all seven of the books and loved Jack's writing deeply.
But I was SHOCKED AND DISMAYED about Susan. When Peter tells the last prince that Susan is no longer a friend of Narnia , and then later on Queen Lucy sees England in the New Narnia and her mother and father waving at her, well Susan is not there.
So I don't understand, what does this mean. She isn't ever going to be in heaven or the New Narnia with the family? What was her crime? She was just becoming adult and being a human , living in the human world she had normal human girl interests. And also it says specifically that she merely laughed and asked the others if they were still playing those games like they did when they were little.
Also, since Aslan forgave much much worse in humans and animals, could Susan not be forgiven. I am totally confused on this point and could not bear the thought that Susan, after all she did for Narnia, was left out in the end to be alone and without her family or Aslan.
Can someone help me on this,,,,,,,,,,please. Thankyou.
I am the same amount of confusion and curiosity as you. I don't know a thing about why is it like that. Does anyone know the answer in the whole wide cruel world, anyone???!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
It is not that Susan was doing something really bad--at least not at first. But I think what Lewis was showing was that she was becoming "worldly" in the theological sense. Remember, he was writing an allegory for children. So he wouldn't necessarily show her doing something seriously wrong. He would just hint that now her heart was no longer where it belonged. And it isn't that she could not be forgiven if she wanted to come back. The thing is, she never wanted forgiveness. She never wanted to come back. She doubted even the existence of Aslan and Narnia--in other words, Lewis was saying she became an atheist after she had talked to Christ. Not a good thing, and hard to be forgiven. Not impossible, if one wants forgiveness. But quite impossible without sorrow. So it is not Aslan who was being cruel--it is Susan.
Hey, everyone that did posts here are elves from Rivendell and that post Gandalf-Olorin was very interesting. Big Smile Smilie
Susan showed up with the rest of her siblings at The Last Battle, so I don't think you need worry about her.
So, from an allegorical point of view, would that symbolize that she repented and sought forgiveness before the Second Coming of Christ? (It's been a LONG time since I read any CS Lewis, so I'm actually struggling to even remember how the story goes...)

And BTW Grondy ruined the "Rivendell theme" that Glorifindel mentioned. Oh well, LOL!
Just to pop in and say HA! Lorien rules!
Grondy dear, I am sure you are quite mistaken. Susan was not part of the Last Battle whatsoever, and Prince Caspian or whoever was the last asks Peter the Great where she is since one is missing. He tersely answers that Queen Susan is no longer a friend of Narnia.
I have the tapes from the BBC in which David Suchet is King Aslan and I am sure that I remember Lucy looking in the far off distance after the explanation of Susan and she sees England, well the new England, everything worth keeping is there in Narnia only better.She sees her mother and father, they have made it, one never even had a hint they were friends of Narnia. So poor Susan is still in our world and Peter,Edmond and Lucy are dead as well as the parents.
I just cannot think what you mean Grondy.
Leelee,

I think you are right. I have The Last Battle here with me, and in that passage, it reads:

"'Sir,' said Tirian, when he had greeted all these. 'If I have read the chronicles aright, there should be another. Has not your Majesty two sisters? Where is Queen Susan?'

"'My sister Susan,' answered Peter shortly and gravely, 'is no longer a friend of Narnia.'

"'Yes,' said Eustace, 'and whenever you've tried to get her to come and talk about Narnia or do anything about Narnia, she says 'What wonderful memories you have! Fancy your still thinking about all those funny games we used to play when we were children.''

"'Oh Susan!' said Jill, 'she's interested in nothing now-a-days except nylons and lipstick and invitations. She always was a jolly sight too keen on being grown-up.'

"'Grown up, indeed,' said the Lady Polly. 'I wish she would grow up. She wasted all her school time wanting to be the age she is now, and she'll waste all the rest of her life trying to stay that age. Her whole idea is to race on to the silliest time of one's life as quick as she can and then stop there as long as she can.'"

This passage seems to indicate that Susan's big sin was denying Narnia's existence, hence denying that God and the supernatural exist. But it also indicates that Susan was still alive, since it has the characters speaking of her in the present as living and planning for the future. It seems to me she is the only one of the family still living in the "old England" while the rest have gone to heaven, the "new Narnia."
Yup, before I read the above post I grabbed my written copy and it opened to that exact page. So I am once again proven wrong; my heart was in it, but my mind wasn't. I must have fallen asleep before the end of the story on my CD, so that part wasn't refreshed for me. Those are wonderful recordings Leelee; I just finishe sleeping through the ending of Prince Caspian the other night. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
Thankyou so much Gandalf-Olerin, I have not the time at the moment to check. I thought I was having a brain warp or had listened to the tapes and read the book when I was in the middle of a break down or something. What a great relief.Poor poor Susan, all alone now and the thing is I wonder what would bring her to that place after she somehow was able to cope with losing so many at once, what would be the thing that Aslan would use to show her it wasn't just children's games played back in the misty world of childhood, but that it had really occurred. That would have been an emmensely exciting book to read had there been one.
Grondy do you have ALL the tapes? I only have the Last Battle and the strange and wonderful thing is I was at the supermarket one evening and was tired and I think waiting for someone and this particular supermarket has bins here and there through the store with all sorts of hard cover books in them, every conceivable subject thrown together with no rhymne nor reason.
I often will look through them because they are at least fifty per cent less in cost than the exact same book at the local bookstores. And I can use that extra for those in need.
I saw the cover and was immediately unable to do anything but pick up the box. I thought it was a strange DVD but no the tapes. My heart pounded with some sort of secret joy and I bought them right then and there and marvelled that the thing had not been snapped up. It was as if it was waiting for me.
That weekend I listened and everything about it was as good or better than a spectacular motion picture show. And the music.
And to think you have them all? I cannot fathom the joy.
Again dear Gandalf thankyou.YOu are very very kind.