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I started reading The Hobbit again , anyone heard of it ?

No, sorry.

I'm reading a collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
Outlander - by Diana Gabaldon
Last night I finished Laura Lippman's By a Spider's Thread, not in the top ten of her nine volume Tess Monaghan series of mysteries. Tonight I'll start Sharan Newman's Heresy, the eighth in her excellent Cathrine LeVendeur mystery series.
I just finished Perelandra and am now starting That Hideous Strength by C.S.Lewis
Perelandra is an excellent read. I never enjoyed That Hideous Strength quite as much as the first two in that trilogy. I think I got to used to reading about Ransom and whenever I pick up t.h.s. I always wonder why he doesn't show up much in the first 3/4 of the book....

I'm tackling another Lewis book at the moment: Till We Have Faces
I'm reading Magician's Guild, by Trudi Canavan.
Nothing at the moment ..any recomandations ?
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Nothing at the moment ..any recomandations ?

Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert.
I recommend The Count of Monte Cristo, House of the Seven Gables, all of the sappy Jane Austen novels (I know, many people hate them, but I love them), and Evelina by Frances Burney.

I just finished Sharpe's Rifles by Bernard Cornwell and loved it, so I'll probably be reading the rest of the series. I like the TV show with Sean Bean, but these books are soooo much better! Go figure. Sean Bean does make a great Richard Sharpe though.
I finished the Sharpe Series quite a while ago. I ought to get the author's, War of Independence series as told from the side of a Tory officer, the ugly competent one who occasionally spent some time in the Sharpe series as Sharpe's friend.

Tonight I may start reading A Crown of Swords, the seventh in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series; though I may not, as I spent most of last night finishing Heresy, instead of sleeping, It was a page-turner.
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I finished the Sharpe Series quite a while ago. I ought to get the author's, War of Independence series as told from the side of a Tory officer, the ugly competent one who occasionally spent some time in the Sharpe series as Sharpe's friend.

Have you read any of Cornwell's other books? Such as the Warlord Chronicles? I was wondering how they are...

Sharpe's ugly, competent friend? Is he the one with the horse-hair wig and the false teeth?
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Sharpe's ugly, competent friend? Is he the one with the horse-hair wig and the false teeth?

I think he may have an eyepatch and may not show up until the third book, if I'm thinking correctly: The one where the women were kidnapped by bandits and a temporary truce was called with the French, while Sharp and Company made the rescue. The friend held a hilltop for Sharpe against the French. Oh yes, "and the rockets' red glare" were given their military test trial there too, before being taken on to Fort McHenry and Francis Scott Key's poem. It has been years since I read it; and no, that series is all I have read by Bernard Cornwell.
After reading marvelous Tolkien; I fall into the grip of Donaldson's "Thomas Covenant - the Unbeliever". The Cronicle about a man regarded as a loser in our world turns out to be the HERO who is needed to save the WORLD. Highly recommended.
I hated that series, though I read most of it; Thomas the Whiner, is what I called him. I don't have leprosy, but I've had to use a wheelchair since 1981 and I haven't been complaining about it on every other page.
Tonight I will start Sharan Newman's The Witch in the Well, the tenth volume in her twelth century Cathrine LeVendeur murder mystery series. Oops! I haven't yet read The Outcast Dove, so I guess I better order and read it first. Which means I don't know what I will read tonight.
I read Thomas Covenant many years ago, both the trilogies. I liked the first one better, I guess because it had a better ending IMO. I didn't like everything Donaldson did with the series, especially the second foray into the Land--the second trilogy. I guess I didn't interpret Covenant as whining so much as doubting much of the time.

Has anyone ever read Sorcerer's Son by Phyllis Eisenstein, and its sequel The Crystal Palace? I thought they were pretty good.
I have to agree with Grondy on Thomas Covenant, and add that when you start the series by making the protagonist a rapist it kinda ruins him as a "hero."
I agree with that, Morambar. But as it is presented by Donaldson, the whole reason Covenant was the "Unbeliever" is that he didn't believe he was in a real place at all. He thought he was delusional and that he would wake up and find the Land a dream. It took the better part of that first trilogy, I think, till he found out that he was really there. And believing it was a dream, he thought he could do whatever he had always done in a dream. But if I remember rightly, when he eventually found out it was a real place, he regretted his horrible acts.
Cant wait book number 2 in Diana Gabaldon series about the Iverness . Anyone read them ?
No I haven't read them Mellon.

I'm currently reading A Friar's Bloodfeud another in Michael Jecks's series of Knights Templar Mysteries.
I'm readin....Legacies by L. E. Modesitt....really good so far, and its the first western/fantasy if I ever saw one.
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Cant wait book number 2 in Diana Gabaldon series about the Iverness .




Some wife of mine have just been to Inverness, read the book, bought the book for herself and swear to me, that we are going back to the Cairn before the year has turned.

Sånn er det bare
I'm reading War and Peace. I've always wanted this classic under my belt, and have decided it's high time!
I started Sharan Newman's The Outcast Dove', the ninth volume in her twelfth century Cathrine LeVendeur murder mystery series. In this one Miss Newman has switched to Cathrine's cousin, Solomon for her protagonist, rather than Cathrine or her husband Edgar. Read Smilie
Tonight I'll probably start reading Terry Pratchett's Thud!, which I think is another story from the annals of the Nightwatch of Anhk-Morpork.
Just started 1776 by David McCollough.
I've heard that was a good book; I asked my daughter for it last year, but have yet to receive it. I did read his John Adams a couple years back and found it interesting.
I finally recieved my book " Dragonfly in Amber "by Diana Gabaldon Smile Smilie CANT wait to start Waving Hello Smilie
I'm reading A Feast for Crows by George R.R. Martin Orc Smiling Smilie

Congrats on getting your books in Mellon!
Thanks Happy Elf Smilie
I'm reading book nr 3 of the Emperor-books. The author is Conn Iggulden an Englishman living in Hertfordshire. The books about Julius Caesar are incredible detailled and tells the roman history in a new and intruiging way. Book nr 1 is "The gates of Rome", Book nr 2 is called "The Death of Kings!". The book I'm finishing tonight is "The Field of swords".
I look foreward to the last book although we all know how it will end.
I postponed reading Thud!, and will start it another day. Tonight I will start Path of Daggers the eighth book in Robert Jordan's 'Wheel of Time' series, having borrowed it from my foot surgeon this morning.
I'm awaiting the fourth book in the Emperor-serie, which are due this fall.

I have been to and fro semi-religious books lately. After Dan Brown's "The Da Vinci Code", there have been more similar ones. Today I started to read Lynn Picknett & Clive Prince's "The Templar Revelation". The adversement looked promising so Im really intruiged! Read Smilie
I've finished my book quite a while ago and have been reading paperback ever since so I had to begin on another ...
At the moment I'm reading A Woman in Berlin by Marta Hiller ( though she wanted it to be kept a secret (anonymous) before her death ) Original title is ;Eine Frau in Berlin -Tagenbuchaufzeichnungen vom 20.April bis 22.Juni 1945 . It's documents from her diary from the days after the 2 War ended .. Very sad reading...Anyone heard of it ?
Nope. I'm again reading Terry Pratchett's Thud!. It is great fun and filled with more belly laughs than the rest of his recent books. It is about how Commander Vimes and the City Watch try to keep the peace between Anhk-Morpork's Dwarves and Trolls, who are bound to refight the Battle of Koom Valley yet once again.
Nope to Mellon's question as well. Right now I'm reading Angels and Demons by Dan Brown. Oh thrillers are not usually my type, but this one is good. And I have recently finished the Sea by John Banville, 26a by Diana Evans, and Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. Oh and my mother is trying to make me grasp a few concepts of German by making me read things like Schneewittchen and Rumpelstilzchen. I don't see why I need to know German. All Germans speak English. If you ask me, french is the langauge we all need to know, since the French are all arrogantly not spekking English.
Since Deutschland seems to be a recurring topic:
I'm not sure how to say the title in German, but the book 'Everything is Illuminated' by Jonathan Safran Foer sounds pretty good! I've only read a chapter or two, but I've had a few friends and a family member read it and tell me the book was amazing. Has anyone else perused it?
(I saw the movie, and I must say that was awesome!)
The Oathbound Wizard by Christopher Stasheff. It is the 2nd book in his Wizard in Rhyme series. So far, up to par for him, and fewer bad puns than the average in his Warlock books... I think there have only been maybe one or two in the book so far.
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If you ask me, french is the langauge we all need to know, since the French are all arrogantly not spekking English.

Well, while we're at it, here's another blatant generalisation : the English-spekking ppl don't even try to learn/use a foreign language "just because everybody in the world spekks English". But considering the horrible accents, that's perhaps not such a bad thing.

That said, I think we should all need to know either Chinese/Mandarin or Spanish. Chinese/Mandarin is the most spoken language in the world, and Spanish second. English is only third!
Oh dear, Vir! I never had the head for language the way I wanted to. I tried to learn, believe me, but never got to the point of fluency. Now I fear it is too late. Forgive me for being a benighted, one-language moron...
I will not even bother correcting that post, since then, Vir would have to edit his post as well... But Chinese/Mandarin does seem to be hot these days. Two of my mother's friends are learning it. Spanish is supposed to be easy, though I don't know why I've never gotten the head for it either.

And by the way, I've finished Angels and Demons. The ending was rather out of my speculations, but shocking all the same. It doesn't seem so scary now that it's all ended... Wonder if they'll make a movie out of this one as well?
I really hope so Clover I've read it as well Smile Smilie Good book indeedHappy Elf Smilie
I Yes Angels and Demons was a good read and a much better story than the one by the same author, which Tom Hanks saw fit to film; though I've heard that recent film tuned out to be a fiasco at the box office.
I thought it was better than the world-famous Code too.

What I can't believe about this book, though, is that the whole book only recounts events that happened in a few hours. It seems so action-packed.

Now I'm, starting on Eldest, the sequel to Eragon. This friend of mine has been bugging me to read it, and well, I don't find it quite so interesting, but I thought I might give it a shot.
Speaking of movies, the movie version of Eragon is coming soon too. I've never read it, is it good? I always see it in the displays in bookstores but there's always another book that captures my attention so I never got around to buying that one.

Right now I'm currently reading The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova. It plays on the idea that the original Dracula is still alive and so far (I'm on Chapter 11) it's been quite interesting.
December 15th is the due date for Eragon; coincides with the last day of Finals week at college!
Wiggle Smilie
I enjoyed the first two books and am waiting impatiently for the third to come. Paolini has some characters and situations that can be seen in other authors work, but the way in which he combines the elements gives it a fresh twist. I'd most certainly recommend them; the reading isn't hard (they carry the books, like HP, in the Children's section), and it might give you more insight if your interested in seeing the film.

If you do decide to give it a read, tell me how you like it Naira! Read Smilie

Dragons! Jumping Flame Smilie
Funny enough, I've just picked up Eragon from the library.

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Right now I'm currently reading The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova. It plays on the idea that the original Dracula is still alive and so far (I'm on Chapter 11) it's been quite interesting.

I've read that book (in English, even), and it's very good... safe perhaps that the ending is a bit disappointing.
Early this morning I read a barn burner (page turner) by Sharan Newman entitled The Witch in the Well, the tenth book in her 12th century 'Catherine Le Vendeur Mystery Series'. I consider it the best one in the series, even if I winkled out who-done-it before the end.
Hmm, right now I'm reading the Fellowship of the Ring Shocked Smilie , Narn i Hin Hurin, A Tolkien Bestiary by David Day, Atlas of Middle Earth by Karen Wynn Fonstad, and Letters from J.R.R. Tolkien. (A little Tolkien heavy, I know, but there good, even if the Bestiary isnt accurate).
I'm reading The Unfinshed Tales again..can't really get enough of those storiesHappy Elf Smilie
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