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Well I must say that since I've left college and got to University I have simply not been reading at all. The only book I think I read in the past few months is Nancy Drew's Secret of Shadow Ranch.

Eerie. Very Eerie.
I am now ready to start Silverthorn, vVolume 3 of Raymond E. Feist's 'Riftwar Saga'
Going to start Michael Jecks's 'The Templar, the Queen and Her A Knights' the newest paperback edition in his Templar Mystery series. This one involves Sir Baldwin and Bailif Puttock accompany Queen Isabella of England on a diplomatic mission to her brother, France's Charles IV to France in 1325. As Sir Baldwin was is a Templar and has mostly kept that fact secret in England, returning to France will be dangerous for him, but he was ordered there. So I expect sparks to fly were the authorities to recognize him after all these years after the eradication of the Templars by the Pope and the French King's father, who did it for money, rather than the stated charge of heresy.
Last night I decided to again read, for about the fourth time, Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman; I love that story.
Last night I started Brisingr by Christopher Paolini, which is book three of the Inheritance Trilogy (Eragon was book one). Read Smilie
Precipice by Colin Forbes. Love that book. Read it countless times.
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Last night I started Brisingr by Christopher Paolini, which is book three of the Inheritance Trilogy (Eragon was book one).


Well I finished all 748 pages of it last night, or rather early this morning, and it was a good read; but Paolini couldn't finish his story in this third volume, requiring him to wrap it up in a fourth volume, which he must now write. He finished writing Brisingr in September of this year so we will have another long wait. Orc Sad Smilie

The book ended kind of sad, ala some of the later Harry Potter books, though is wasn't tear jerker sadness, as I hadn't invested anywhere near the emotional capital in Paolini's characters, as I did with Rowling's.

Tonight I will probably start reading Raymond E. Feist's A Darkness at Sethanon the fourth and final volume of the Riftwar Saga
I think I'll start Gregory Maguire's Mirror Mirror, which seems to be the 'Snow White' tale set in 16th century Italy with Lucresia Borgia taking the part of the vain and wicked queen.
Tonight I think I'll start Terry Pratchtt's newest novel: Nation, which doesn't appear to be a Diskworld novel. It seems to be about the survivors of a tsunami.
I am now reading Raymond E. Feist's Prince of the Blood the coming of age story of the next generation in his the Riftwar Saga.
Now I'm trying to wade through John Keegan's A History of Warfare. It has been a slow bedtime read: I don't find I'm falling asleep; I'm just putting the book down way before my normal one hour reading time is over.
Im currently readin Mika Waltari's Mikael Karvajalka...
Christmas Eve I started to read for the second time Terry Pratchett's Hogfather. I've watched the movie a couple times and it is ingrained on my mind; I don't remember my first read of the book. So far the book hasn't deviated much from the movie other than being a little more verbose.
Last night I started reading Raymond E. Feist's The King's Buccaneer. another coming of age story of the next generation in his the Riftwar Saga characters; specifically the youngest son of the King of the Western Kingdom.
Now I'm reading for the second time The Emperor's Pearl, a Judge Dee Mystery by Robert Hans van Gulik.
I'm reading Hinterland, the second book of James Clemens' Godslayer chronicles & Kushiel's Avatar, the final book of the Kushiel trilogy by Jacqueline Carey. I should also finish Moorcock's Elric series one of these days.
I have been again reading through all the Judge Dee series of ancient Chinese mystery books by Robert van Gulik for the second time with a time out to again read Candace Robb's Owen Archer mystery The Apothecary Rose.
I'm now reading for the second time, Neil Gaiman's Coraline in case I want to see the new animated movie by that name.

Carry a stone with a hole in it and watch out for the button eyed ones!

Be afraid, very afraid!
I just finished Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe's Tiger, about how Private Richard Sharpe got his tiger and his second and third stripes. Also, how he got those awful flogging stripes across his back.

I think I will next read Anne McCaffrey and Elizabeth Ann Scarborough's Maelstrom, the second volume in their 'Twins of Petaybee' series.
I am currently reading Anne McCaffrey and Elizabeth Ann Scarborough's Deluge, the third volume in their 'Twins of Petaybee' series.
Now I have started reading Michael Jecks' newest in his Knights Templar Mystery series, The Prophecy of Death.
I must be tired Grondy for I thought you wrote 'by Michael Jackson' and I was all amazement Smile Smilie

i am currently reading The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien and it is past wonderful. It just seems to get better each time I delve into its depths.
Last night I started reading Stephenie Meyer's Twilight, only because my foot doctor said it was good and we usually like the same genres. For weeks I had been procrastinating starting it, because the movie's trailer turned me off what with all the teenie-boppers swooning over the movie's leading man. I'm close to a hundred pages in and so far it is a good easy read; not quite a barn burner, but close. Read Smilie
How could you, Grondy? I'll probably read it eventually, but still just because im a hypocrite does not mean that you have

I decided not to finish that sentence shortly after deciding not to punctuate the second clause. I really had no point, and the first sentence conveys my sentiments just as well without further utterance.

P.S. - I am well aware that the use of the word utterance implies speech."
!Margwaffel!
Count Chocula would be rolling in his grave.
I just finished reading Nick Harkaway's The Gone-Away World. and now I have started Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe's Triumph which is one of the prequels and takes place in 1803 India.
I'm reading Witch Fire by James Clemens.
I just finished rereading One Bullet Away by Nathaniel Fick. I find it interesting that Evan Wright's Generation Kill and this book can be about the same story (mostly) and yet so different. If you like military books I definitely recommend them both, but Generation Kill is a bit more...crude.

As a side note Grondmaster you have good taste. I too enjoyed the Sharpe series, although each book is quite similar in structure.
Now I'm reading for the second time Candice Robb's Lady Chapel, which is the second book in her Owen Archer mystery series and takes place the 1365 City of York, England.
Last night I started reading Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe's Fortress, which is one of the prequels and takes place in 1805 India.
Now I'm reading E.L. Doctorow's American Civil War novel, The March about General William Tecumseh Sherman's 1864 march through the south as seen through the eyes of some of the fictional characters that experienced it.
I'm reading Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand.
I have just started reading The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart. The way it starts drawing the reader into it is just like Gandalf's tale to Beorn. Our eleven year old hero has volunteered to take a test under mysterious circumstances and after passing that test, they add another test where an additional test taker is included, and then another test with an additional test taker, all without any explanation as to what is really going on. I was hooked, just like Beorn.
I just started reading Unfinished tales by J.R.R. Tolkien.
I am now reading The Books of Magic #1: The Invitation by Carla Jablonski (Author), Neil Gaiman (Author), John Bolton (Author)
Since I last wrote in this thread, I have read:

Trenton Lee Stewart's The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Perilous Journey.

Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe's Fortress, Sharpe's Trafalgar, Sharpe's Havoc, and Sharpe's Escape.

Carla Jablonski's The Books of Magic #2 and 3, which are full text versions of the graphic novels by the same titles written by Neil Gaiman and drawn by John Bolton.

And now I am reading Carla Jablonski's The Books of Magic #4, the next book in the above series.
Almost finished Raymond E. Feist's Silverthorn will then read
A darkness at sethanon oldies but goodies, tend to be just rehashing the same old same olds lately.guess I'm stuck in my ways.
Our class is about to begin The Great Gatsby, sigh... Though, it does get us out of this Emily Dickenson poetry we are presently reading.
Rho posted Tuesday 28th April 2009 (09:30pm):
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Almost finished Raymond E. Feist's Silverthorn will then read A darkness at sethanon oldies but goodies, tend to be just rehashing the same old same olds lately. guess I'm stuck in my ways.

I often tend to do that too; though not when I find new books to try. I need to find some more of the 'Rift War' books, the ones that come after those two; except I've already read his 'Empire' trilogy.
Now I'm reading Anne McCaffrey and Todd J. McCaffrey's Dragon's Fire, which is another in the Pern series about a mute boy who becomes a Harper in the earlier years.
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I need to find some more of the 'Rift War' books, the ones that come after those two; except I've already read his 'Empire' trilogy.

As somebody who trudged through all the written works of Brooks, Eddings, Feist, Goodkind, Jordan, et al. I'd advise against it.

The entire Serpent War and the Interludes are severely lacking in story & characters; whilst the Rift War is about political intrigue on both sides of the Rift, the Serpent War is nothing but a degradation into a Robert E Howard like sword & sorcery story.
Aye, I read the serpent war saga a while ago. In fact I have them all on my book shelf, I've only read them the once or twice.You almost get the feeling Mr Feist is unwilling to let go of a successful franchise and keeps rehashing the same old thing. Still, it's an ok read to pass the time.
I recently started The Eye of the World, which is the first book in the Wheel of Time series. I find it very interesting, and am excited to be starting the series.
I'm reading Shardik by Richard Adams. I read it once years and years ago and thought it was the one book I would never want to re-read because of some of the horror in it but changed my mind.
I just finished reading Raymond E. Feist's Shadow of a Dark Queen and am now reading the second book in his Serpent War Saga, Rise of a Merchant Prince.
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I just finished reading Raymond E. Feist's Shadow of a Dark Queen and am now reading the second book in his Serpent War Saga, Rise of a Merchant Prince.

It's amazing how that series manages to combine so many of the most bland & annoying characters ever to appear in fantasy literature.
Yes, but Douglas Adams and Robert Jordan are gone and Terry Pratchett has Alzheimer's and I must read something to take my mind away from the crappy world's age we live in.
I only remember one character by name and that's Nakur who was pretty fun - a mix of Gandalf & Minsc.
'Anyone care for an orange,' Nakor asked as he pulled another half-dozen oranges from his previously empty bag. 'I don't do magic, I just do little tricks,' he said. Typical paraphrases of a couple of Nakor's exclamations. His little tricks usually had magic involved somewhere in the background. Like his endless bag of oranges involved coupled twin portals: one in the bottom of the bag and the other over a bin of oranges in a warehouse. - This post and the one above regarding Raymond E. Feist's later stories.
Went on holiday to Taupo bay last week and bought Krondor the assassins and David Eddings Sleeping god thingy on Trade me to read while there. I've put off reading the Eddings one for years now as the last Sparrow Hawk series was so so, and Redemption was the biggest pile of dribble I've read in years. I really wish I'd saved my cash, It's a shocker man. the characters are direct copies of direct copies of direct copies. And the story has about as much solidity and grittiness as a plate of custard. Blaaaaaa, stay well clear all. The Feist one on the other hand is OK, Jimmy was one of my fav Feist characters so I'm enjoying it. Him and Locky are in their late Twenties so Jimmy, or James as he's called now still has a lot of the cheeky arrogance that made him so attractive in the first place. He gets all serious and callous in prince of the blood and is not as much fun. Am only about 50 pages in so far, so'll let yahs know how she went when I'm done. cheers all
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