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Thread: Middle-Earth's rich Culture

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Have yo watched Lord of the Rings?I hope you did and you can see plenty of different types of architecture and culture.From round,quant hobbit holes(Bag End) to the sharp Iron archicture of Mordor(Morannon and Barad Dur) to the buety of Rivendell, Lothlorien and the Grey Havens to the wooden houses of Bree to the Grandea of Minas Tirith there is so much architecture to choose from to build stuff. They have different personalities. For example Mordor's one is a shabby, sharp and evil culture while Elve's culture is rich,onderful and, pretty as well as good-natured people(Elves). Bree looks like an typical, medeavil town while Minas Tirith and Osgiliath are like the Ancient Rome or even better.You know, I will like to see pictures of easterling or Haradrimtowns or cities, or even their clothes or something.
Have to agree with you Smile Smilie I'm facinated by all the designwork that went into the movies, the amount of research and creativity just took my breath away! I never considered comparing Minas Tirith to ancient Rome but I think you're right. I believe Edoras and Meduseld were suposed to be based on Viking culture. All in all, I would have given my right arm to have been able to be involved with the project, even just hemming the costumes would have been the experience of a lifetime!
Yes, I agree that the Rohirrim were either a viking culture or (Early)Anglo-Saxon culture mixed with some Normans for the Normans are professional horse riders (till their race died out). I will love to have some Elvish clothes and Gondorian Armour would you??? Smile Smilie Big Smile Smilie
Normans originated from Vikings, and though the House of Normandy ended, the people from Normandy never died out. They conquered Britain and hence mingled with the people there. During the crusades they also started mingling in the Mediterranean and the Middle-east.
I What he said is what's what. Thumbs Up Smilie Happy Elf Smilie
And in case it's too obvious... a Norman is a Nor(th)man, looking at the term anyway.
I nver knew that. For that I'm going to put up this.I
Actually the banner of rohan resembles, a white horse on a green field, is like the white horse on a green hill found somewhere in England. (sorry folks i forgot where it it, maybe someone can enlighten us)

Edited:
I did a quick search and found out it is known as Uffington White Horse, and is found inOxfordshire!

Grondy added the link.
And Oxfordshire is right in the heart of the old Anglo-Saxon kingdoms -- approximately on the border between Mercia and Wessex. So, in addition to the language of Rohan, this horse emblem seems to be yet another link between the Rohirrim and the Anglo-Saxons. Cool!

Here is a page which has a picture of the Rohan banner. It's about halfway down the page "Limited Edition Eomer Banner". Yup, it's almost identical to that Uffington horse.
I love the Rohan scenes. If nothing else, for the view of the mountains! But the music in those scenes also caught my ear. the Rohan theme seems particularly apt to overlook the wide windswept plains in sight of the high snowy ridges and peaks. And the dirge Eowyn sings for her cousin's funeral in one of the extended scenes should never have hit the editing room floor! If you want something of the rich culture in Rohan, I think that funeral scene shows a side of it that is underrepresented. Mourning and burial rites are essential parts of culture (for the mortals, that is) -- this is one of the few we see in the films.
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And the dirge Eowyn sings for her cousin's funeral in one of the extended scenes should never have hit the editing room floor!

It would not, hath not some editors, whilst listening to the White Lady's mordant voice, hit the floor in agony, some deaf, others insane.
Well the burial seen has plenty of white flowers( I can't remember the name) and that they buried Theodred but I don't like funerals for they are a bit sad aren't they? The Rohirrim had nice horses and the buildings and te peole look early Anglo-Saxon period and they seem like horse-fanatics for they rode them everywhere and they are carved lovingly on the Medused.
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but I don't like funerals for they are a bit sad aren't they?

Not in all cultures.

It also very much depends on who's dead.
Ding Dong! The Witch is dead. Which old Witch? The Wicked Witch!
Ding Dong! The Wicked Witch is dead.

- The Munchkins' song from The Wizard of Oz
Yes, you're right, it depends about who's dead. If a dreadful tyrant dies, people will be celebrating it wouldn' they? But if it's a really nice, keen,intelligent and good king people would be moaning over his death.