Child's book

swampfaye
Posts: 390

Child's book

Post#1 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Justifiably so, IMO, Tomi. This classification is Tolkiens own fault, though for calling it a "childrens book" because he didn't want to be embarassed by his peers (bunch of stuffed shirts that they were).

I frankly don't think you should call the style of the Hobbit "Childlike." LOTR is extremely hard to get through even for most adults. As a writer, I can tell you that clear and concise writing like in "the HObbit" is a gift. Tolkien lost many readers when he graduated to a more difficult style of writing. Just like Sam, the simple gardener, was invaluable to the quest of the ring, simplicity is often invaluable to writing. I still enjoy the HObbit, which is not writen in the vein of "Harry Potter" which is specifically targeted to children. Tolkien never intended it to be a "childrens book".

Ungoliant
Posts: 993

Child's book

Post#2 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Er..but he did. He wrote it for his children. Hence the simple style of writing. A bit like the 'Wind in the Willows', written by K. Graeme for his kids when they were down with measles or chicken pox or whatever.

But does it matter if they classify it as a children's book? It's still fun - they could define it as a book for fetuses if they like, but I'd still like it.

Eryan
Posts: 845

Child's book

Post#3 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Oh I love this remark about a "book for foetuses"!
:D :D :D (Is this the right icon for loud hearty laugh??? If no - sorry for being
stupid!!)
Actually, Hobbit holes such as Bag End are so very similar to homes of animals from
"Wind in the Willows" - I love that book, too. It is also a "child book" but some of
its passages are pure poetry...
Do you remember Mole and Water Rat having a walk on a winter evening and
looking through a window at a sleepy bird in cage?

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grondmaster
Posts: 25451

Child's book

Post#4 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

And besides all that, what's wrong with children's books. I still enjoy an occational romp through 'Where the Wild Things Are'.

And my favorite part of 'The Wind in the Willows' is Mole's Christmas homecoming; he was so sad and miseable; Ratty was so kind and optomistic; and the field mice carolers were so cute.

'Share and enjoy'

Ungoliant
Posts: 993

Child's book

Post#5 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Yes, that was nice Grondie, although my favourite were all the Toad bits, especially the bit when Badger banned him from ever driving motor cars again. And he promised, but broke his word as soon as they left the room. I adored him! He was my role model when I was a kid. :D

As for the Hobbit, it was first published in 1937 I think - Chris Tolkien (assuming he's 70-ish now) would have been 3 or 4 then? He's the third son (or child), so the Hobbit would have been written for him or his elder siblings. Besides, it said so in the Hobbit.

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PlasticSquirrel
Posts: 3577

Child's book

Post#6 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Yep, it's a kids book no two ways about it (not that there's anything wrong with liking kid's books when you're all growned up). And the Sil and UT are under Other, because they aren't conventional fiction by any stretch of the imagination, and nor are they non-fiction reference books in the strictest sense so they have to be other.
Btw, my favourite bit from the Win in the Willows is Mole getting lost in the woods, scared the hell outa me :D and then Badger rescues him and everything's better, fantastic! *wanders off in search of his old books*
http://www.plasticsquirrel.co.uk for all your bizarre music and musings needs

Ungoliant
Posts: 993

Child's book

Post#7 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Oooh! Forgot about that! Must find that book again. I love Badger too...so stern & cross & proper. A bit like my husband. :D

swampfaye
Posts: 390

Child's book

Post#8 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Badger?? Badger? We don't need no stinking Badgers!

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grondmaster
Posts: 25451

Child's book

Post#9 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Everybody needs a badger type in their lives; someone who is stable, who knows where his towel is, who you can talk to and who actually listens to what you have to say, and whose advice when they finally come to give it is worth more than the powder to blow it up. That is the kind of badger we are talking about. That is the kind of badger that Kenneth Grahame wrote about, at least as seen through Mole's and my eyes. :)
'Share and enjoy'

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PlasticSquirrel
Posts: 3577

Child's book

Post#10 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Why d'you think I give out cuddly badgers? :)
http://www.plasticsquirrel.co.uk for all your bizarre music and musings needs

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