If not for Peter Jackson

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chris63
Posts: 218

If not for Peter Jackson

Post#1 » Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:37 pm

Would Lord of the Rings ever have made it to film if it wasnt for Peter Jackson ?
Couldnt see another directer spending 8yrs of his life on one project
Dont think i would have seen it in my life time, and i'm 47 ( but look 30 ish) :oops: :oops:

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Gandalfs Beard
Posts: 2311

If not for Peter Jackson

Post#2 » Tue Jul 27, 2010 11:27 pm

You won't get any argument from me :mrgreen: . I'm just waiting for Petty or Eldo, to jump on this one though. :lol:

GB

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pettytyrant101
Posts: 1383

If not for Peter Jackson

Post#3 » Tue Jul 27, 2010 11:34 pm

Oddly enough I agree- I think he royally cocked up the end product but I can't deny him his drive to get it made in the first place or the time and effort he committed to it- I just wish he had thought the script just as important. I find it astonishing he would embark on such a job requiring military style planning and god alone knows what problems with Producers and the like, devote years of hos life to it, oversee set and costume and character designs when he didn't even have a finished script WHILST FILMING IT. That to me is madness and sadly it shows in the end product.

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Eldorion
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If not for Peter Jackson

Post#4 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 9:40 am

Absolutely it would have. In fact, Ralph Bakshi, and Rankin/Bass brought it to film decades before PJ did. :P :P

Assuming you mean live-action I suspect it would have eventually, but not necessarily any time soon. The idea to make it into film was not the studio's idea but PJ's himself, and I'm not sure how many other directors would have had that idea. The fantasy film genre has always been rather weak: before LOTR and HP the highest-grossing such film was Steven Spielberg's Hook and after LOTR/HP the only other series to even start to come close was Narnia. There have been directors who made their names with sci-fi films (Ridley Scott and James Cameron come to mind) but I can't think of any such directors prior to PJ who did the same with fantasy.

I'm not sure someone who was already famous and successful would have touched LOTR and I'm not sure another relative nobody would have been able to convince Saul Zaentz to loan out the rights and a studio to invest hundreds of millions of dollars, especially not with the extraordinarily high level of creative control held by Jackson and all three films being shot together before a single penny had gone back to the suits.

I'm sorry to disappoint, GB, but I don't think many would have been able to pull off the perfect storm of accomplishments that PJ did, whatever I may think of his 'faithfulness' and lack of subtlety.

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Eldorion
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If not for Peter Jackson

Post#5 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 9:43 am

pettytyrant101 wrote:he didn't even have a finished script WHILST FILMING IT. That to me is madness and sadly it shows in the end product.


As I recall he had a finished script but kept changing it during filming. I don't think it's good to set everything in stone but the way it was handled - with several actors not even having time to read their lines before shooting - leads me to agree that it was "madness".

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Ally
Posts: 95

If not for Peter Jackson

Post#6 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 12:57 pm

Eldorion wrote:
pettytyrant101 wrote:he didn't even have a finished script WHILST FILMING IT. That to me is madness and sadly it shows in the end product.


As I recall he had a finished script but kept changing it during filming. I don't think it's good to set everything in stone but the way it was handled - with several actors not even having time to read their lines before shooting - leads me to agree that it was "madness".


I wouldn't say "madness". I agree with you; you can't film three films at the same time without changing a few things. But these lines that the actors didn't have time to learn, they weren't that long I assume - only a short conversation here and there. So if PJ thought they were rubbish they could retake. I remember watching the DVD special feature DVD for FOTR, where Dominic Monaghan said he only had 15 minutes to learn his lines for a scene. Maybe it wasn't the best preparation for actors, but it certainly didn't spoil the experience for me.

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Tinuviel
Posts: 474

If not for Peter Jackson

Post#7 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 12:58 pm

Well I'm glad PJ made the movie. He had some great people working behind him that helped him make history. I'm just glad he did it PRE- reccession :lol:
But I find that the movies and the books are similar in one way at the very least: They both never should have been done! (in a corporate sense) LOTR was something that, looking back, the publishers should never have published, mainly because of the sheer size of the novel, not to mention all of the extra information he tacked on. And filming LOTR was just as messy, but we don't need to go into detail about that...

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Eldorion
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If not for Peter Jackson

Post#8 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 1:03 pm

Ally wrote:But these lines that the actors didn't have time to learn, they weren't that long I assume - only a short conversation here and there. So if PJ thought they were rubbish they could retake.


According to John Rhys-Davies he had boxes of envelopes with script rewrites that were shoved under his door regularly that he didn't even bother to open. If I recall the EE documentaries correctly other actors had the same thing. I agree with you that small scale changes to the script are fine but I can't imagine that having such frequent changes couldn't have helped the artistic outcome, especially since the tight schedule of filming precluded numerous re-shoots.

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Eldorion
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If not for Peter Jackson

Post#9 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 1:06 pm

Tinuviel wrote:(in a corporate sense) LOTR was something that, looking back, the publishers should never have published, mainly because of the sheer size of the novel, not to mention all of the extra information he tacked on.


How so? I can understand how before publication LOTR would have seemed like a bad book to publish (in fact the British publishers expected to lose money on the book and only published it because they thought it deserved to be) but in retrospect it was clearly a very good deal, having sold hundreds of millions of copies.

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Ally
Posts: 95

If not for Peter Jackson

Post#10 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:57 pm

Eldorion wrote:
Ally wrote:But these lines that the actors didn't have time to learn, they weren't that long I assume - only a short conversation here and there. So if PJ thought they were rubbish they could retake.


According to John Rhys-Davies he had boxes of envelopes with script rewrites that were shoved under his door regularly that he didn't even bother to open. If I recall the EE documentaries correctly other actors had the same thing. I agree with you that small scale changes to the script are fine but I can't imagine that having such frequent changes couldn't have helped the artistic outcome, especially since the tight schedule of filming precluded numerous re-shoots.


It couldn't of helped, no. I suppose the reason for such frequent changes is Jacksons love of LOTR. He really did want to make a perfect middle earth, so he kept changing things to make the film- that he will always be known for- better. I'd be the same. So it wouldn't of helped, but definitely didn't spoil a thing.

Tinuviel wrote:Well I'm glad PJ made the movie. He had some great people working behind him that helped him make history. I'm just glad he did it PRE- reccession :lol:
But I find that the movies and the books are similar in one way at the very least: They both never should have been done! (in a corporate sense) LOTR was something that, looking back, the publishers should never have published, mainly because of the sheer size of the novel, not to mention all of the extra information he tacked on. And filming LOTR was just as messy, but we don't need to go into detail about that...


I am also glad PJ made the movie. But the publishers knew how popular The Hobbit was, and more stories about them would sell. They knew that. Tolkien wanted to publish The Silmarilain along with LOTR- that would have been mess!

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