Favorite part?

curufinwe
Posts: 305

Favorite part?

Post#1 » Thu Dec 19, 2013 8:32 pm

I am sure most of us can remember the first time we read the books. But why did many of us chose to go further? If you read The Silmarillion why did you want to? This question is about a specific moment in LoTR that you liked a LOT, but was mysterious enough that you wanted to find out more. Mine is the scene where the Ents were wrecking Isengard, and then one of them got sprayed with lava. I thought it was so incredible, and the image of an Ent enraged has stayed with me even to this day. What was even better was when Orthanc has just a few scratches. I thought, "Who made creatures that can spend a...very...long...time saying hello and then rage for hours? Who made a tower that could withstand that without any damage?" That scene is the reason that I read The Silmarillion (and others). What things or scenes or lines made you go further?

Amras
Posts: 451

Favorite part?

Post#2 » Fri Dec 20, 2013 12:00 am


the king of Theoden might not of led the army of rohan at the pelannor fields.



Amras
Posts: 451

Favorite part?

Post#3 » Fri Dec 20, 2013 12:03 am


 i am really a fan of the gondor scenes,so if i was not a rivendell elf,dunedain of gondor all the way,such valiant men to hold the terror of morgul so long.



curufinwe
Posts: 305

Favorite part?

Post#4 » Fri Dec 20, 2013 8:29 pm


Thanks Brego, I wonder a lot about Huorns to. If they had not changed the rout of the orcs to a slaughter maybe Rohan would not have felt safe riding to Gondor, and the whole fate of Middle-Earth would have been different. And yes, Gondor is very valiant to. Especially when Tolkien describes the walls, "The bones of the earth." The blood of Numenor was a mere shadow of what it had once been, but it was still very powerful. Many of the Gondor scenes made me come close to crying because they were once so vast and powerful and had dwindled with the years, until they were so weak (at least by comparison to what they once were) that they could not even people their own lands. For me Gondor is a sad story, and yet their is a possibility that Aragorn can make it prosper...



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brego
Posts: 1275

Favorite part?

Post#5 » Sat Dec 21, 2013 2:11 pm


Nice thread Curufinwe.  My favorite intriguing moments from LOTR are those which involve the Huorns. Are they under evolved Ents, Old Ents, Maia spirits in tree form or just animated enraged trees? Every time they are mentioned by JRRT I want to know more. If it was not for the Huorns, the outcome for Middle Earth would have been very different.



Amras
Posts: 451

Favorite part?

Post#6 » Sun Dec 22, 2013 1:55 pm


Well Curufinwe,about the population,i will try to see this out like a math.When the captains of the outlands came,they brought around 2000 men,5000 from the southeren fiefs and those defending the rammas echor osgiliath and cair andros,so about  8000 to 9500 soldiers.The gondorians were very valiant playing  a key role in the battle of Pelannor fields.



curufinwe
Posts: 305

Favorite part?

Post#7 » Sun Dec 22, 2013 3:07 pm


Tolkien literally wrote, "their were not enough people left to people the lands of Gondor after the long siege of Barad-dur" so I am rather sure that they fell from a massive nation to one that while still strong was very weak by comparison. That is why it is a sad story, because they went from being amazingly powerful to a week nation.



glorfindel
Posts: 285

Favorite part?

Post#8 » Sun Dec 22, 2013 5:36 pm

Gondor is a good lesson to learn about war and conquest. There is a limit to the size of an empire. An empire's borders expands bringing in riches, but it comes at a high price. The nation will start to weaken from within. Two of history's mightiest empires learned this and halted their expansion. The Romans and Mongols realized they didn't have to enough manpower to maintain order with such a massive empire.

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brego
Posts: 1275

Favorite part?

Post#9 » Wed Dec 25, 2013 7:22 pm


Saoron also spread a pestilence, a plague, which wiped out a lot of people of Gondor. This along with a dwindling of the Westerness blood line weaknd and reduced the power of the once great people.



kurandan
Posts: 9

Favorite part?

Post#10 » Wed Dec 25, 2013 8:05 pm

Hi guys, The Bridge of Khazad-dum,where the hell did that balrog come from? The Silmarillion characters almost seem to enhance vague memories for some reason, Thingol Galadriel etc, the names and places fit perfectly

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