Bob's your uncle???

gimli_axe_wielder
Posts: 561

Bob's your uncle???

Post#1 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Well stop lurking and say hello!!!!! sheeesh.. you just cant find good friends these days ya know :P:
GRONDY WORSHIPER

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Allyssa
Posts: 1657

Bob's your uncle???

Post#2 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

My Concise Oxford Dictionary defines 'Bob's your uncle' as being slang for 'all is well'.

This phrase can be used even if one does not have an Uncle Robert.
"May the Angels Guide"

Luthien79
Posts: 81

Bob's your uncle???

Post#3 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Yeah, we have loads of those type of sayings over here.

In Yorkshire we have one people used to say when they could see a black sky full of rain coming across. They would say "It's a bit black o'r our John's mothers". LOL.

Just sayings, nothing to get eaten up over gimli, LOL. ;)

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Ross
Posts: 2147

Bob's your uncle???

Post#4 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

No Allyssa, Bob's your uncle, means there you go!

Yeh we have loads of them like:

It's raining cats and dogs: Oh no I just got hit on the head by a falling pet!

Not in a mounth of sundays: I don't know how to use a calendar!

Eih I smell like a gypsy: I have no hot water! (one for me then!

Baker's born and bread: My parents are pushing me into the family business, but I want to be an actor!

You comin' up topshop's: Come on I'm lazy you can carry my shopping!

He's bone idle: I can't palm this job off on him so I will on you!

The list goes on!
Sod off I'm busy!

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Ross
Posts: 2147

Bob's your uncle???

Post#5 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

So where about in Yorkshire are you from Luthien79?
Sod off I'm busy!

Mithrilblade
Posts: 19

Bob's your uncle???

Post#6 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I agree with Ross on that definition of 'Bob's your Uncle'

The phrase came about in around 1937 and is used to 'express the ease of which a task can be successfully completed'


Ok squit! :D

gimli_axe_wielder
Posts: 561

Bob's your uncle???

Post#7 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

*gimli scratches head*



You sure that's english??????

oh well, just call me a cheeky fellow :P: nn[Edited on 12/3/2003 by gimli_axe_wielder]
GRONDY WORSHIPER

Luthien79
Posts: 81

Bob's your uncle???

Post#8 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I'm in South Yorkshire.

Cause it's English gimli. We are, after all, English. You are American.....remember. ;) English is whatever way the English people choose to speak it. Accents and sayings are different all over the UK.

We have loads of slang and saying.

1. About as much use as a fart in a windstorm = Useless.
2. Out of his head = Drunk
3. leg it = Run quick
4. Put the wood in the hole = shut the door
5. Does my head in = Gets on my nerves
6. Up the wooden hill to Bedfordshire = upstairs to bed.


Even better is the Yorkshire persons way of saying them.

1. Abaatazmuchuseazafaartinawindstorm.
2. Aatanized
3. Legi'
4. Pu'wudin'oil.
5. duzmiyedin
6. Upthewudenilltebedfordshire.


Oh, Ross. We used to use the saying "Never in a month of Sundays". It actually means "Not for ages" as in seeing enough sundays go by that will fill the value of a month on their own.nn[Edited on 12/3/2003 by Luthien79]

Mithrilblade
Posts: 19

Bob's your uncle???

Post#9 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

yes Gimli, squit squirt, short fellow :P


Luthien and Ross are north. I'm in the south, London to be exact. We say some things differently

musicimprovedme
Posts: 240

Bob's your uncle???

Post#10 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Oh gosh, wanna hear some more??

slicker than snot=pretty darn slick
colder than a witch's tit=pretty darn cold

I got this in my email once, don't know where it comes from:

The wheel's stilll spinning but the hamster's dead. I LOVE THAT ONE!

A few other terms for less than perfect mental health:
Lights are on but nobody's home...3 bricks short of a full load...not playing with a full deck...elevator doesn't stop at all the floors.

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