Tolkien's Basis

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PlasticSquirrel
Posts: 3577

Tolkien's Basis

Post#1 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

oooh! I was just reading an essay on this last night, now where did I put it....?

Actuallly, it was mostly from the Norse, and a few Germanic tales and the old Atlantean legend as wel, oh and the Arthurian myths too. Anyone who says the Bible needs their head read. Will post again when I can remember the rest of it.
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Princess_Lùthien
Posts: 240

Tolkien's Basis

Post#2 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Thank you Plastic, I will be looking forward to the rest of Tolkien's basis of his works. :)

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Allyssa
Posts: 1657

Tolkien's Basis

Post#3 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

David Day wrote a book on the very subject: "Tolkien's Ring".
It is also illustrated by Allan Lee. ISBN 0-261-10298-2

This book covers: Norse Mythology, The Volsunga Saga, Arthurian Legends, Celtic and Saxon myths, German romance, The Nibelungelied, Greek and Roman myths, Biblical legends, Oriental myths and a various other discussion.nn[Edited on 29/10/2002 by Allyssa]
"May the Angels Guide"

Eryan
Posts: 845

Tolkien's Basis

Post#4 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Don't forget the Finnish mythology, the "Kalevala"! The story of Turin is largely ispired by the Finnish legend about Kullervo son of Kalervo (I'm not sure about the spelling...). And Quenya is also influenced by Finnish!

Princess_Lùthien
Posts: 240

Tolkien's Basis

Post#5 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Thank you all!! I have learned very much in the last few days.

Samwisegamgee
Posts: 607

Tolkien's Basis

Post#6 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Good question, Princess_Luthien! In one of his letter, Tolkien says, 'I am a philologist, and all my work is philological'. A philologist is someone who studies old texts, like Beowulf and the Kalevala, and when Tolkien says his work is philological, I take that to mean that he is stating the fact that he uses ideas from other old writings to make his own writing. Some of these are:
Beowulf: Some of the names, such as Folcwald and Hama, come from this poem which Tolkien studied and wrote numerous essays on. There was also a scene in Beowulf when a slave steals a cup from a dragon hoard, like Bilbo and Smaug.
Kalevala: Kullervo, as Eryan said. Also there is an old man in the Kalevala who uses magic and is reminiscent of Gandalf. And there is a magical object which gives its owner great wealth but is destroyed in the end to ensure peace...and Norse mythology influenced him as well.nn[Edited on 2/11/2002 by Samwisegamgee]

Princess_Lùthien
Posts: 240

Tolkien's Basis

Post#7 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I really like the story about beowulf. My Global Awareness teacher, Mr. Herman, told us that it is a poem. But someonme made it into a story. It was very good.

Samwisegamgee
Posts: 607

Tolkien's Basis

Post#8 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Have you ever read Seamus Heaney's translation of Beowulf, Luthien? It is really good. Plus a dashing introduction.

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Ross
Posts: 2147

Tolkien's Basis

Post#9 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Don't forget Ragnorock, there will be war in the heavens and that men shall venture from Odins feating hall and fight with him against Loki. All shall be killedapart from one of Loki's fire deamons who shall burn the earth. However the sun will rise after the seven years of winter and things will grow anew. It's sort of reminsant of Almaren being burned by the lamps, the fall of Utmno, the slaying of the tree's and the fall of Angbad, the sinking of Numenor and even the rebirth of the realms of Gondor and Arnor.
Sod off I'm busy!

Cirdan
Posts: 163

Tolkien's Basis

Post#10 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Actuallly, it was mostly from the Norse, and a few Germanic tales and the old Atlantean legend as wel, oh and the Arthurian myths too.


Plastic are you sure???!!!! I thought Tolkien was particularly uninspired by the athurian legends. He had a characteristic dislike of Christian asscociated myth stories. Theres a definate influence of stories like Beowulf, germanic and finnish folk tales (in the language construction as well) but I'd heard that he was creating a myth FOR England due to its lack of anything he considered cohesive and unaffected by later sensibities and beliefs(such as christianty)
aaaggh, just re-read this and it sounds condemning...not intentional! What essay did you get this from by the way?

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