Boromir

swampfaye
Posts: 390

Boromir

Post#1 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I didn't like the Boromir character in the book. He was always saying "I told you so." and that's just plain anoying, and when he wasn't anoying, he disapeared all together (maybe it should have been Bore a Mir).

I loved the movie Boromir. Felt pitty for him, felt concern for him, unlike I thought I ever would... It must be the acting and directing because I cry more and more each time i see Boromirs Death sceen.

hannum4
Posts: 5

Boromir

Post#2 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

i agree with swampfaye obout the book boromir. but even if i hadn't read the book it was very apperent from the beginning that he wanted the ring for himself. but in the later books it decribes him as on caring for his country and willing to do anything he sees nessicary to save it. and if you noticed in the movie argon was always watching him.

o and the way he does is awsome. he died with some serious skills. but i wish they would have showed more orcs and things with him when he died and also that they would have put the orcs weapons in the boat with them.

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grondmaster
Posts: 25451

Boromir

Post#3 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Welcome Melathiel. I don't believe Boromir was evil by nature, The Ring just drew on his concern for the people of Gondor and bent that, trying to get him to take The Ring from Frodo.
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Allyssa
Posts: 1657

Boromir

Post#4 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Sean Bean's performance as Boromir gave me a stronger feeling of sympathy for him. In the book, I also found him irritating at times, a bit like a person who talks far too much. I kept wishing he would shut up and stop making such a twit of himself.

In spite of Tolkien's descriptions, I never imagined him as remotely attractive, more like the Nasmith interpretations.

Boromir's death in the film is the most moving scene of all. I found it even more poignant than Gandalf's death for some reason, (maybe because I know Gandalf is not dead). The only thing lacking was a little more blood. I'm not blood-thirsty! I just know that for a man to bleed to death, he has to loose a LOT of blood. I guess PJ was thinking of the kiddies.

I think Boromir is not overly bright, which is why he cant understand the need to destroy the ring. He is very likeable, but a bit dumb (sorry). PJ represented his character well in that respect, and we see that not only does he understand it in the end, but in the movie, Aragorn comes into acceptance of his heritage at the same time. A possible improvement on the plot, I think.

Like Elija Wood's Frodo, Sean Bean's Boromir gave me a greater sympathy and understanding for the character.

Hope I didn't rabbit on and bore you Mel.
"May the Angels Guide"

Eryan
Posts: 845

Boromir

Post#5 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I will make comments only on Boromir from the book. I like him a lot and I can easily identify with him. He seems to be so strong, a real bully sometimes... but deeply inside he is very uneasy and frustrated. He is feeling he is giving much and receiving too little. Mark his constant comments about "gratitude", about people which show little gratitude to Gondor for fighting in their defense. During the celaring of the path on Caradhras pass he also makes remarks of this sort.. He desires gratitude. He needs it. Why? Because in his heart he feels unloved (I guess). He is told to be the favourite of Denethor, but I strongly suspect that Denethor was anyway much too cold and demanding, not giving him praise and warmth enough. And both Boromir and Faramir are half-orphans, their mother died young...

Ungoliant
Posts: 993

Boromir

Post#6 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Well I liked the movie Boromir...but having just read the book again, I must say that I prefer the book Boromir more.

I didn't have a problem with his incessant whining (since Luke whined more & I still liked him :)) and desire for gratitude. Remember, even Denethor & the honourable rangers Aragorn & Halbarad also commented on the lack of gratitude (from the rest of ME, Barliman & the Shire folks, etc).

I felt sorry for Boromir - he wanted to be king but unfortunately didn't have any royal blood. Pity the guy. He would have been a great King of Rohan though, or, had he lived, a king of the southern regions.

Eryan
Posts: 845

Boromir

Post#7 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Yes- I pity him too!
What I like in him is also his sense of responsability. Yes, he is not very royal...
and yet he IS a leader. He does not wait te be commanded to do this or that:
he is constantly taking initiative and/or giving advice!
He is acting most of the time as a kind Big Brother, keen to protect his companions.
And then he has to die...

In the book the description of his death is extremely moving, too.

["Farewell, Aragorn! Go to Minas Tirith and save my people! I have failed."
"No!" said Aragorn, taking his hand and kissing his brow "You have conquered, Few
have gained such a victory. Be at peace! Minas Tirith shall nit fall!" e o/quote]

I think that Aragorn did here the very best thing that could still be done. I was
particularly moved by the fact that he dared to kiss him. It must have brought a great
solace to Boromir. Now he was no more an Elder Brother who failed - but a Younger
Brother in arms of a yet Elder Brother assuring him that everything will end well...

Ungoliant
Posts: 993

Boromir

Post#8 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Now he was no more an Elder Brother who failed - but a Younger Brother in arms of a yet Elder Brother assuring him that everything will end well...

Hmm, never thought of it that way, Eryan. Interesting thought that. :cool:

Eryan
Posts: 845

Boromir

Post#9 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Thanks for that nice smile, Ungoliant!
I cannot arrive to insert smilies into my texts alas!!!!
Actually, Aragorn was much older than Boromir - when he was fighting in Gondor
as Thorongil he was the rival of Denethor![Edited on 10/2/2002 by Eryan]

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grondmaster
Posts: 25451

Boromir

Post#10 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

"...in Gondor as Thorongil ...". I know Aragorn served in Gondor and Rohan in his younger years (2957-80 T.A.); but didn't know that he went by another name. Whence comes that tale? :)
[Edited on 11/2/2002 by Grondmaster]
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