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Discussions about Non-Tolkien Books
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Grep
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Post#1 » Sat Jun 18, 2005 5:30 am

'Lifeless' by Mark Billingham

I'm a bit of a fan of detective novels, not so much thrillers but the likes of Ian Rankin and Colin Dexter. I'll let you know what I think of the book once i've finished it!

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Grep
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Post#2 » Sat Jun 18, 2005 6:07 am

I often wonder if i've picked up certain character traits from each of the detetive books - i'm a real ale snob like Morse and a Single Malt fan like Rebus. I wonder what i get from DI Thorne. Anyone else find odd bits off favorite books in their character?

Morambar
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Post#3 » Tue Jun 28, 2005 6:37 pm

I've found I can be a bit full of myself and overly sneaky like Mat Cuathon (Wheel of Time,) not to mention having a fascination with military strategy and tactics. Ask me how p----d i was at how Jackson did the Battle of Pellenor Field? You just don't turn a formation of pikemen 180° in an instant; when cavalry suddenlty show up on the flank of pike, pike die, quickly and painfully, amid charge-wheel-repeat until they're all dead or they break and you run 'em down and THEN they're all dead. Whole libraries have been written on the "turning movement" to change infrantys orientation on the march (which is about the only way it could be done,) and his skill in its execution (largely due to the first regularly drilled army) were a large part of Alexanders success.

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grondmaster
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Post#4 » Tue Jun 28, 2005 7:51 pm

For another thread on this subject Click Here.

Last night I started a reread of The Sandman: The Dream Hunters written by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Yoshitaka Amano. I received this beautiful book from my daughter a couple years ago for Christmas and have since forgotten what it was about, which is why I am reading it again. I have found Gaiman's other Sandman series of graphic novels very interesting; loved his Neverwhere and the one he co-authored with Terry Pratchet Good Omens, as well as his American Gods.
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grondmaster
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Post#5 » Tue Jul 05, 2005 3:32 pm

Friday afternoon my foot surgeon stopped by with his copy of Dan Browns Special Illustrated Edition of Angels & Demons as I had previously loaned him my copy of C.S. Lewis's Space Trilogy. These books are Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That hiddious Strength.

But back to Angels & Demons, I took it to bed for my bedtime story at 1 am Saturday thinking it would put me to sleep in a few minutes, even though it was very heavy (weight-wise) for reading in bed. It was a horrible read causing me mush loss of sleep, :elfwink: for I kept saying "Just one more chapter," time and again. I finished this 500 page barn-burner (page-turner) 10 hours later at 11 am. :elfbiggrin: Now I'll have to find The Da Vinci Code.
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grondmaster
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Post#6 » Thu Jul 07, 2005 6:34 pm

Now I'm rereading Saint Liebowitz and the Wild Horse Woman by Walter M. Miller, Jr., which was written as a sequel, 38 years after the publication of A Canticle for Leibowitz.

It tells the story of Brother Brownpony St. George, a Monk in the Brotherhood of Saint Liebowitz in the 34th century. He is suffering a crisis in his faith beween the paganism of his Nomadic fore bearers and his religious vows. Trying get him around this crisis, he is sent as translator for his uncle Cardinal Brownbony, who is traveling to New Rome for the election of a new Pope. There he is subjected to forbidden secular temptations and the vortexes of political intrique.
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Morambar
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Post#7 » Thu Jul 07, 2005 7:03 pm

I'd much rather discuss this appealing work despite knowing nothing about it. I can't tell you in detail what I think of Dan Browns work other than to note that the Priory of Zion is ancient organization almost a decade older than me, whose founder did time in a French prison for mail fraud. When I told my mother this in a discussion of the Da Vinci Code here response was "So he's a con-artist?" Yep.

I have real issues with Mr. Browns whole this-is-a-work-of-fiction-based-on-proven-fact disclaimer when in FACT those "facts" are anything but. Given statements elsewhere I can't get into now they would create more questions than they answer if they WERE true.

And besides, aren't you supposed to be starting The Eye of the World soon? :elfwink: Countdown to October (if you have no life at all and read nothing else you might be caught up by then) continues; Demandred's out there somewhere, and his self control has to give out soon....

At the moment I'm rereading LT2 and reflecting on how it's been so long since I have that there isn't even any loose tobacco in the spine between pages. Great was the fall of Gondolin indeed, and HoME still lures me the way it always has: if you want LotR like detail on such matters rather than a few sentences, that's the place to go. Soon, however, I'll have to dedictate a few obsessive weeks to Lord of Chaos through Crossroads of Twilight to refamiliarize myself in time for Knife of Dreams. In the interim I've learned that the Borderlander saying "Death is lighter than a feather; duty is heavier than a mountain" was actually one of the Kamikazes mantras. It fits, in a lot of ways.

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inwé
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Post#8 » Mon Jul 11, 2005 11:51 am

right now im reading Eragon, alot of kids my age say its like the best book! haha yeah right. Well sometimes i get really frustrated while reading it because on the map some names look as if they were taken right from tolkien! GRRRRRRR!! They have like an Arwen River or something close to it and it just boils my blood! i mean how can people get away with that kind of thing? its crazy. well its a pretty easy read and I'm just trying to get through it so i can read The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien or maybe There and Back Again an Actors Tale by Sean Astin (or something to that effect hehe)

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inwé
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Post#9 » Mon Jul 11, 2005 12:09 pm

what is the DaVinci Code about anyway. one of my fellow pupils (haha i sound so smart) read it this past year and said it was good but i just kinda lost on what its about? haha

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eruwen
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Post#10 » Mon Jul 11, 2005 12:59 pm

Morambar stated:
I can't tell you in detail what I think of Dan Browns work ...

Oh man, I am so glad that I am not the only one to hate Dan Brown's work. I read The DaVinci Code, (silly, silly girl), because everyone was raving about it. I have not read a book that was so poorly written in, well...in a long time (and when I say poorly written, I mean sentence structure -- of which I pretend to be no master -- but I certainly recognize complex sentence structure when I see it). I heard Angels and Demons is better (and I'll trust Grondy that it's a good read), but I still will not support it after reading The DaVinci Code...*gag*. The stupid clues he gave, I figured out in about two seconds, and was wondering why the so-called professor couldn't (hey, they were like your backwards writing, Morambar). And don't even get me started on the inconspicuous albino. A friend of mind hates when I say this, but I'm going to say it anyway....WHATEVER!

As for taking on character traits, I try to be honorable like the good Horatio Hornblower, try to be fit like Aragorn, try to brood sometimes like Harry Haller (from Steppenwolf) and Holgrave (from The House of the Seven Gables), and I try to be unpredictable like Hermine (also from Steppenwolf).

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