Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

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grondmaster
Posts: 25451

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#1 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

After you read LotR a few times the world also starts to gel; however, there are some of us who are map people and have dog eared or book marked the map pages upon our initial reading. Then to follow the different groups on their journeys, we go so far as to buy The Atlas of Middle-earth (Revised Edition) by Karen Wynn Fonstad, Houghton Mifflin Co. 1991, 8" x 11" paperback, 210 pages, about $24 U.S., ISBN 0-618-12699-6

It contains detailed maps and explanatory text covering The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, The Silmarillion, and a tad bit from History of Middle-earth.
'Share and enjoy'

Samwisegamgee
Posts: 607

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#2 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I just got The Atlas Of Middle Earth and find it very helpful. :D However, I still have one question: Where is (was) Beleriand in relation to the map in LOTR?

chikakat
Posts: 729

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#3 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

The first time I read the books, I definitely did get bored with all the scenic descriptions..."So, another tree. Great. Let's move on."...Reading it over again, I really got into all the detail, though. I don't feel like it adds all that much to the story, but it's priceless in terms of the world Tolkien created. :)

I should probably get the Altas of Middle Earth...I don't know where anything is ever... :P:

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PlasticSquirrel
Posts: 3577

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#4 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I just got The Atlas Of Middle Earth and find it very helpful. :D However, I still have one question: Where is (was) Beleriand in relation to the map in LOTR?


Under the sea, to the west of the grey havens.
http://www.plasticsquirrel.co.uk for all your bizarre music and musings needs

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valedhelgwath
Posts: 4233

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#5 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

In fact Lindon and the Grey Havens are the only surviving part of what was Beleriand. Extending to the west of the Blue Mountains, Lindon is in the area of Beleriand that was then known as Ossiriand.

Samwisegamgee
Posts: 607

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#6 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Thanks, I get it now. :D

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MelliotSandybanks
Posts: 1517

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#7 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

The first time I read The Hobbit and LOTR, all the details that Professor Tolkien gave really confused me. I was a newbie to the world of Tolkien and did not have any maps. I kept wanting to find out where the dwarves and Bilbo were and the same went for the Fellowship. I kept getting places mixed up. So, my 2nd time through I started do searches on the web, and that really helped me a lot. I now have maps all over my house, and I never get confused anymore, because I can just look it up and know right where everyone and everything is. That is part of the way I found PT. I was looking for answers to quizzes (from another website) and more and more maps. I have become a true map person and have just ordered the Atlas of Middle Earth that Grondy mentioned. I can't wait till it arrives.



nn[Edited on 2/6/2003 by MelliotSandybanks]

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valedhelgwath
Posts: 4233

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#8 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

I still love my Middle Earth Roleplaying maps as they are in colour and all the mountains and trees look real. Having small pieces of blue tac representing the characters slowly making their way from one place to another really helped bring the whole place alive for me.

musicimprovedme
Posts: 240

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#9 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Yeah, well, I like the maps and everything. It's not everyone's locations, in fact, I think they add to the story and I kind of dig em, you have to kind of know where the good guys and bad guys are in the story, so you know if the people are in any certain dangers. What gets difficult for me to sit through is stuff like...well, everytime someone in the story stops and looks around Tolkien goes on about the scenery down to the last blade of grass. Not just rolling hills but a whole paragraph about how they roll and where and what color they are...etc etc. It bogs down the story to me, I don't have much concern for detail like that, if they are in the mountains and its snowing...I fill my head with mountains and snow and try to GET ON WITH THE PLOT.

Actually the maps and geography of everything are relativel easy for me to understand and well worth the time to find out where things are.

nn[Edited on 8/2/2003 by musicimprovedme]

Dain_II
Posts: 28

Hard time with all the geographic detail in Tolkien's work?

Post#10 » Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am

Most of the books come with pretty good maps, don't they? I mean, the Atlas of Middle Earth is excellent, but to follow the story, it's fairly easy with the maps in the books.

I understand what you are saying, mim, and sometimes I skim a bit (usually without realizing it). It's something in Tolkien's style that people debate about--some people think he writes boring prose, and some people love it. Personally, I love his style, especially in the Hobbit when he's being a little less serious. Think of the passages where he describes the terrain as those movie shots where they pan across the people walking (like the FotR shots of the fellowship)--they show that time still passes pretty slowly when you are walking across a country. I mean, it would have been pretty boring if he'd just said "they left Bree and walked for days, finally arriving at Weathertop" or something like that... ;)

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