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Thread: Trivia: Barad-dur

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Bottom of Page    Message Board > General Discussion > Trivia: Barad-dur   << [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37] [38] [39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [48] [49] [50] [51] [52] [53] [54] [55] [56] [57] [58] [59] [60] [61] [62] [63] [64] [65] [66] [67] [68] [69] [70] [71] [72] [73] [74] [75] [76] [77] [78] [79] [80] [81] [82] [83] [84] [85] [86] [87] [88] [89] [90] [91] [92] [93] [94] [95] [96] [97] [98] [99] [100] [101] [102] [103] [104] [105] [106] [107] [108] [109] [110] [111] [112] [113] [114] >>
Pretty Water Lillies?!?!?
Yup, Lemaly Orangeflower gets the pretty bauble. Happy Elf Smilie

Where did the hobbits find a barrier with a large board saying NO ROAD Question Smilie
I'll say coming back to Hobbiton when they reached the bridgegate, thought that sounds wrong to me, somehow. Still, you did say, "the hobbits" and there are few places where multiple hobbits were traveling alone. Just like ol' Sharkey to lock a hobbit out of his own home, eh?
No, the notice at the bridgegate at the Buckland Bridge read something like "No Admitance Between Dusk and Dawn". They found the "No Road" sign a day later, their travels home took them two days to make the journey from the bridge to Bywater. Happy Elf Smilie
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Grondmaster
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has made 13070 posts is a Dwarf from Glittering Caves and is not Online.
Posted Thursday 28th July 2005 (10:44pm)
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Yes Elrose, it was Forn, so you get the pretty bauble.

Where did the hobbits find a barrier with a large board saying NO ROAD

Well that time thing was a tad bit verbose, what I should have said is: "Go ahead and make your post, then compare the time of your post to the time I made my post, if the difference is less than 24 hours you had best delete your post.
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Caudimordax
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has made 374 posts is a Dwarf from The Lonley Mountain and is Online.
Posted Saturday 30th July 2005 (03:37am)
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The East end of the village of Frogmorton. They were seeking The Floating Log
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Caudimordax gets another Pseudo-Silmaril for the second time he has given the correct answer to this question. Happy Elf Smilie I don't remember if this is only the second time I have used it. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie

Please understand that I have been providing these trivia questions at a rate of approximately one per day or 365 per year during the past five years; and you are going to get many repeats. If you can think of any fresh questions, PM them to me and I'll fit them in from time to time. Thanks.

Who helped Melkor despoil the Two Trees and steal away the Silmarils Question Smilie
UngoliantSmile Smilie
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Grondmaster
has made 13083 posts is a Dwarf from Glittering Caves and is not Online.
Posted Thursday 1st January 1970 (01:00am)

Correct as always Val.

Where did the hobbits find a barrier with a large board saying NO ROAD?


Quote:
Grondmaster
has made 13083 posts is a Dwarf from Glittering Caves and is not Online.
Posted Thursday 1st January 1970 (01:00am)

Komosot gets the Pseudo-Silmarillion for his correct answer.


Where did the hobbits find a barrier with a large board saying NO ROAD


Quote:
Grondmaster
has made 13083 posts is a Dwarf from Glittering Caves and is not Online.
Posted Wednesday 3rd March 2004 (09:56pm)

Vee gets the Pseudo-Silmaril this time. Sorry Loni, only one prize per question so hang in there and keep on trying.

Where did the hobbits find a barrier with a large board saying "NO ROAD"




These are the only other ones I could find. So that brings it to only the 5th time. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie By the way, what is up with the "Jan. 1st, 1970" thing Question Smilie Question Smilie Question Smilie I have always wondered. Don't worry Grondy, we all understand.
Yeah, I was also wondering about the 1970 thing? Maybe the website got caught in some weird time/space continuum, dimension crossing thingie Pixie Smilie
If I know the answer, do I get a Psuedo-Silmaril? Or at least a Cuddly Badger of my very own to Ease?

As to WHY it picked 1970 I don't know, but I understand the reason for changing the dates of the older posts is format/hosting changes in the history of the forum.
Mellon has the correct answer and the pretty bauble. Happy Elf Smilie

(I'd rather you looked the answer up in the books rather than doing a website search (googling) for you might even discover something new while you had the book open. Teacher Smilie Besides doing the search back to P-T, just makes me look more like a robot than I am.) Orc Grinning Smilie

Who were the Noegyth Nibin and what is the English equivalent to the Sindarin Question Smilie

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By the way, what is up with the "Jan. 1st, 1970" thing Question Smilie Question Smilie Question Smilie I have always wondered.

About that date on all those old posts: When Taz transferred the forum from EZ-board near the first of 2004 to a forum program he build on his own, he couldn't get the dates to transfer and for some reason his program replaced the actual dates with the "Jan. 1st, 1970" date. It also dropped the first post or a few of them from many of the longer threads; the moderators went back to the old archived EZ-board forum and copied many of those missing posts to the first post in that thread. However, we only did those that had recent activity, going back to copy more when someone questioned about a particular thread or we had some spare time. When Grep bought the website from Taz, we lost access to the EZ-board archive and thus can no longer restore any of the missing first posts.
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Id reather you looked the answer up in the book rather than doing a web site search (googling) for you migth even discover something new while you had the book open besides doing the search back to P-T just makes me look like a robot that I am

My son and I find your questions so interesting Smile Smilie we always look it up in our books if we dont know the answer at once..And we bring the books with us everywhere ..at work /school
This question though we dont knowSmile Smilieand many more of course ..also our books are in norwegian and many of the names are (sorry to say ) translated
Amari has said the Norse translation has some peculiar words in it.

I can give you a hint in that the name in question, is found in Chapters 21 and 22 of The Silmarillion. Read Smilie
It sounds dwarvish what ever it is. You have the Nauglamir, and Nargothrond, it seem that Noegyth Nibin would follow suit, but that just might be coincidence.
I wont argue with you Grondmaster and Im sure Amri is rigthSmile Smilie
Hint: Mm was one of these.
Mim? He was one of the "petty" dwarves. Right? At least, that's how i remember it...
And 'petty dwarves' is the translation of Noegyth Nibin. They were the first dwarves to enter Beleriand and had dwindled by the time the Noldor returned to Middle-earth. So Etharion gets the pretty bauble.

What did Melkor seek in the Void Question Smilie
The Imperishable Flame
His rubber ducky
Virumor's got it; no he doesn't, Thorin does and the Pseudo-Silmaril as well. Happy Elf Smilie

How did Boromir vainly try to summon help before he was killed Question Smilie
Blowing his horn made from the Kine of Araw. It wasn't so much vain as late.
Correct Morambar, have a pretty bauble. Happy Elf Smilie Had the remainder of the Fellowship arrived in time to save Boromir, they also would have been slain, for Grishnak's war party was too strong in number and would have buried them in dead Orc/Uruk-hai.

What colors were Treebeard's eyes.
Straight out of my head.... greenish-brown? Like deep wells they were...
in the movie they were yellow, and we all know that the movie is never wrong.
if you are being sarcastic, the hahahaha, but if your not then, i can say many things that differ from the book, Shelob for instance???

um Treebeard's eyes were brown, but had a bright green light in them
Loss has it and the pretty bauble, Happy Elf Smilie because "They were brown, shot with a green light."

Who was the first King of Rohan Question Smilie
Eorl the Young. Meanwhile, one son of Numenor is worth a HUNDRED Orcs, and wouldn't it have been great to have that last annihilated Orc stumble back to Grishnakh and say, "*cough, cough* It's a trick: there's TWO of 'em! Argggggh!"
I guess vocal tone is not detectable in message board posts for that was purely sarcasm.
That was funny Morambar, I could visualize the scene. Elf With a Big Grin Smilie You also had the correct answer and thus the Pseudo-Silmaril. Happy Elf Smilie

What office had Robin Smallburrow been appointed to under the Chief Question Smilie
aaah yes he was a dear ole hobbit, he was appointed as a Shirrif
You are correct Loss, though with two "f"s, so you get another pretty bauble.

Where was Rath Celerdain, and what did it mean Question Smilie
I think it was in Minas Tirith and means the street were they made lamps ..
Yes Mellon has it, it was the Lampwright's street, where lamps were made. So Mellon gets the Pseudo-Silmaril. Happy Elf Smilie

Which hobbit first discovered the One Ring Question Smilie
Which HOBBIT? I don't believe Deagol was an actual Hobbit (though closely related) so it would be Bilbo. If we include "hobbit-LIKE people who lived by streams" it's Deagol.
Tolkien considered Dagol/Smagol to be of the Stoor branch of hobbit family who remigrated back to the Wilderland in TA 1356 and all contact between this retrograde group and the ancestors of the Shirefolk was broken. He points this out in the lengthy draft of a letter to A.C. Nunn probably dated late 1958-early 1959. (Letter 214 in The Letters of JRR Tolkien edited by Humphrey Carpenter.

So Dagol is the answer for which I was looking and Morambar gets another pretty bauble.

What phrase did Bilbo use for a lot of things.
Good Day? I think....Elf Confused Smilie
I think Lemaly is about right... Saying Good morning etc in a variety of ways..? Please put us out of our misery Grondy!!
Are you miserable Lass? I suppose my questions could be called such.

The answer in English was "Good morning" though "Good day" or "G'day" mean basically the same thing. Still I'll award the pretty bauble to Lass for it wasn't afternoon.

How many dogs did Frodo and his companions encounter at Farmer Maggot's farm, and what were their names Question Smilie (The dogs, not the companions.) Elf With a Big Grin Smilie
There were 3 big dogs at the farm and their names were :Grip , Hogg and Ulv (Norwegian )
I'll take your word on the last two names Mellon and give you the pretty bauble. Happy Elf Smilie In English they were: Grip, Fang, and Wolf; and your last one sounds similar. Does hogg translate to a long, sharp, pointed tooth, especially a canine tooth of a carniverous animal or a snake's hollow poisonous tooth, or is this another one of the funnily translated words?

What stone marked the center of the Shire Question Smilie

The Three Farthing Stone? Or do I have my numbers wrong?
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Does hogg translate to a long , sharp , pointed tooth especially a canine tooth of a carniverios animal or a snakes hollow poisons tooth, or is this one of the funnily translated words?

Im really not sure Grondy but hogg means stabb , so I see hoggs tooth like a sword or as you put it to a long sharp tooth ..Ulv means Wolf
(Ive never understood really why they translate names :.but Ive told you this before Frodo Baggins is Frodo Lommelun -stupid I think )
Quote:
Does hogg translate to a long , sharp , pointed tooth especially a canine tooth of a carniverios animal or a snakes hollow poisons tooth, or is this one of the funnily translated words?

Hogg itself meant bite, stab. Hoggtann = fang. I think it is translated and shortend.

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(Ive never understood really why they translate names :.but Ive told you this before Frodo Baggins is Frodo Lommelun -stupid I think )"


This is nicely explained in the books actually. (I can see if I find the exact place when I get home.) It has to be translated, because Tolkien wanted them to be translated. Tolkien had already has 'translated' all the converations and names from Westron or the common Tongue to English. I am quite fond of the translation. This guy has captured the feel of the names too, not just the exact translation. In the earlier translations the poor Baggins' were called Sekker... I prefer Lommelun. Elf Sticking Tounge Out Smilie
I know Im of the topic but I agree in some of what you say Amari but then again some of the translations I prefer the english version and of course Lommelun is better than SekkerSmile Smilie
Amarie makes an excellent point, actually; in order to preserve the sense of what Tolkien intended we have to have names that are essentially titles for the most part, if often antiquated ones. It's kind of interesting in that names like "Elfwine," "Holdwine" and "Samwise" have very literal meanings and were hence chosen for this very reason, but with the exception of people like the Proudfoots and Smallburrows those meanings are lost on most readers, or at least first time ones. And of course with Hobbits such as these are where you find the glaring exceptions, as they're the familiar Everymen whose names SHOULD be easily recognizable and make you think of the folks you chat with over each others fences because, well, they are. It would be interesting to see how the Rohirrim are handled in this regard in Scandinavian countries because THEY'RE the ones to which those readers would most likely relate, not the country squires and dirt farmers of Hobbiton. The alternative would be to call Merry "Gorbadoc" losing the pun on his nickname and anything generally recognizable.
A very interesting discussion: if I can find time, I may copy it to a thread of its own.

Meanwhile, back at the trivia thread:

The Shire is divided into four farthings, but Morambar has the correct answer Happy Elf Smilie with the "Three Farthing Stone", which is located at the junction of the West, South, and East Farthing borders. The junction between the West, North, and East Farthing borders seems to be unmarked by any stone; however, that may be merely indifference on the Professor's part, as he never wrote about any action taking place there and thus he needed no name for it. According to Karen Wynn Fonstad's The Atlas of Middle-earth, this latter junction lies about twenty miles due north of the Three Farthing Stone. Teacher Smilie

Meanwhile on with the new question:

What did Elrond discover about the map of Thorin's grandfather Question Smilie
He discovered it had once served as a napkin in a restaurant of MacDonald's.
He discovered under the moon light some details how to access the secret passageway into the Lonely moutain, by finding the keyhole to it with the last ray of sunlight at the end of...Fall i think? I really think it's called Fall...
Etharion has it; Happy Elf Smilie though it isn't just Fall (Autumn) it is Durin's Day (the first day of the last new crescent moon of Autumn) when both the Sun and Moon are in the sky together. And the last ray of sunlight on that day will point out the keyhole of the backdoor to the Lonely Mountain,

Which high peak marked the extreme north-western limit of the Misty Mountains Question Smilie
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